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Old 12-27-2012, 02:33 PM   #21
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That was during first year America was in WWII. I wonder how much of those apples ended up in C rations as applesauce? I bet there are still a few cans floating around out there in the world.

BTW, Thanks for posting this, I love historical photographs of all types.

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Gigantic apple piles in the yard of Duffy-Mott Company, Inc. on Lake Road in Hamlin. The company mainly produced cider and vinegar until it began branching out to make other products in the 1930s such as applesauce. Several varieties of apples were used in Duffy-Mott products.

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Old 12-27-2012, 03:37 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by jkoegel View Post
Hey Mike,
I'd like to see those pictures. I'm just down the road a bit from you in Hilton.
I found them online, I think thru the Monroe County Library system.

These links may be of interest to you:

Hamlin Municipal Historian Collection

Hilton Municipal Historian Collection
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Oh, and get a hydrometer. Psychic brewing is great and all, but hard numbers get rid of MUCH of the guess work.
"No longer drink only water, but use a little wine for your stomach’s sake and your frequent infirmities." ~ 1 Timothy 5:23
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Old 12-27-2012, 04:21 PM   #23
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More pics of Hamlin and Apple growing:

Thousands of apples are shown piled in the yard of F.W. Newman, who operated a produce company in Hamlin. From the late nineteenth and into the twenty-first century, Hamlin has been a major agricultural producer in Monroe County. It has been especially known for its apple industry.
Notes Apple pile at F.W. Newman Produce Co. West side Lake Rd. at railroad c. 1908.


Picking and packing apples in the W.I. Smith orchard at the southwest corner of Dunbar and Collamer Roads in the town of Parma, near the Hamlin border. In the foreground, from left to right, are Albert Kruger, Charlie Straub and Miss Ferguson. In the background on the ladders are Leo Straub and Irv Ferguson, who are picking apples. Kruger is operating a barrel press while Charlie Straub and Miss Ferguson are working at the wheeled apple sorter. Apples were sent down the sorting table and bad apples were removed while the others were packed into barrels and stored. Final grading and sorting was completed after the end of the season. Circa 1900


An irrigation cart, drawn by Holverson's mules, is shown in a Hamlin apple orchard. A man stands atop the cart using a hose to spray the apple trees.
Notes: Sprayer drawn by Holverson's mules. Circa 1924


Four men pose with a horse-drawn irrigation cart. Two of the men are shown spraying apple trees using hoses. Note the blankets thrown over the horses to protect them from the spray. The man on the right is Albert Kruger and the probable location is the Tenny Orchard. Circa 1900


Picking and packing apples on the Klafehn homestead, located on Walker-Lake Ontario Road in Hamlin. On the far right stands John Klafehn, Sr. To his right is John Klafehn, Jr. The three young women are Klafehn's daughters; Lena, Elsie and Josephine. William F. Klafehn stands at the far left. Note the tall ladders used for picking apples from the trees. The apples were first put into baskets and then sorted and put into barrels. Circa 1910

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Oh, and get a hydrometer. Psychic brewing is great and all, but hard numbers get rid of MUCH of the guess work.
"No longer drink only water, but use a little wine for your stomach’s sake and your frequent infirmities." ~ 1 Timothy 5:23
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Old 12-31-2012, 03:41 PM   #24
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Found this.

http://www.realspellers.org/forums/o...704-old-grouch
The word cider originally was used in reference to any drink that got you drunk. And at one point in time we were all referred to as girls, no matter your gender.

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Old 12-31-2012, 11:19 PM   #25
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Nice, I like where this is going guys!

Looks like during the 19th cenuty, many American apples were dehydrated and shipped overseas to Europe where they were re-hydrated with water and then pressed to make cheap cider.

Also, historically in England and France apple pomace was pressed once, had more water added and then pressed again to retrieve any remaining sugar. This second pressing was fermented separately to make a lower ABV beverage known as 'small cider'. Commonly drank by the working class of all ages while the first pressing cider was sold to and drank by the upper classes for a profit.

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Old 01-01-2013, 01:11 PM   #26
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Wow, ok. 'Near cider' as well as 'Near Beer'. Very interesting! Makes sense too.

Btw, I looked more closely at that pic of the mountain of apples. The 'river' I saw at the lower part of the pic is JUICE! Probally being squeezed out by the weight of the apples.

*Sniff* so much potential cider wasted! :'(

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Old 01-01-2013, 02:28 PM   #27
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This is deffinitely something I'd like to read up on.


-Kingboomer

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Old 01-02-2013, 12:25 AM   #28
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Looks like dry tannin power known as 'Catechu' was commonly being used as an additive when racking to secondary by Norman cidermakers to the tune of 8oz per 100 gallons back in 1886.

In England, the first written evidence of taxation of cider revenue dates to the mid 12th century during the reign of Henry II. It is also listed as being a source of income for the Abbeys of Battle and Canterbury during the same time. Later, in 1341, over 80 parishes in Sussex alone report cider as part of their tithes.

Within 5 years of Louis Pasteur developing pasteurization, it was being used to help preserve cider for long term storage in Europe and was being practiced here in the US as well.

In England 1662, cider was being sold at 3.5 times the price of beer in the town of Holme Lacy at 14s and 4s per hogshead respectively by the estate of Viscount Scudamore, a family with a particular interest in cider and cider production. By 1702 the price of cider had jumped to 1L 5s. It seems single varietal ciders were all the rage in England at the time with varieties like Somerset Redstreak and Foxwhelp being among the most highly regarded.

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Old 01-02-2013, 01:00 AM   #29
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Another bit with upstate New York origins. I found this one on Google books a while back. I think the author was trying to sell cider mill equipment.

http://books.google.com/books?id=myJ...=cider&f=false

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Old 01-02-2013, 01:02 AM   #30
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More free, old, books on Google:
https://www.google.com/search?q=cide...iw=876&bih=771

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