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Old 06-02-2006, 06:45 AM   #1
RookieBrew
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Default getting ready to try cider!

Hey everyone, I am getting ready to brew a batch of cider. I want to do something really simple. Is it possible to just get juice and add yeast? Also, what kind of yeast will give me a "dry cider." I am a fan of Wyders Cider, if anyone has ever tried it. Could someone please point me in the right direction, possibly throw me a recepie or two. THanks!

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Old 06-03-2006, 12:58 PM   #2
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I haven't made any yet myself, but it's my next project, and this is the recipe I found and want to try. I don't remember who wrote it, but I think it is in these forums. It's called "cheatin' Cider"

Quote:
- 6 gallons of pure apple juice, NO Preservatives.
- 1 Packet of Ale Yeast


Mix together in carboy and install airlock. It will give off a pungent sulphur smell during fermentation...this is normal. Let it ferment until fermentation stops or gets to a SG of 1.010 . Rack the cider and allow it to clear. When cleared, for dry cider just bottle it. For carbonated, mix 5.5oz of corn sugar to a pint of apple juice. Boil it, then mix it with the cider. Mix well, then bottle the cider. The cider should carbonate in a few weeks.
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Old 06-03-2006, 01:12 PM   #3
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It's really that simple, except most of my ciders ferment down to 0.995 or so using ale yeasts. I've tried using a sweet mead yeast, the cider dried out anyway. There are cider yeasts, I haven't tried one.

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Old 06-03-2006, 08:40 PM   #4
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Should you or shouldn't you boil the apple juice first?

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Old 06-04-2006, 03:49 AM   #5
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If it's the non-preservative/pasteurized variety, you really don't need to boil it right off the bat. If you're pressing your own cider from your own selection of apples, it might be a good idea if you don't want any bad bugs in your juice.

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Old 06-04-2006, 12:22 PM   #6
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So...would you say that it wouldn't hurt to boil it anyways as a precaution? Pasteurized pure apple juice I mean. It isn't as if getting spoiled food that shouldn't be spoiled from the store is entirely unheard of.

Or does boiling have an effect on the taste? Then again, I guess you would lose some water from the juice in the process of boiling it...

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Old 06-04-2006, 04:37 PM   #7
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I would think that boiling it would cause a loss in some flavors. also, pasturization doesnt necessarily require boiling, something to keep in mind. If it came from the store pasturized and isnt past its due date I would use it as is. But I havent really done this before, this is mearly what I am planning to do.

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Old 06-04-2006, 04:39 PM   #8
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You could just pasteurize it again, though. No need for boiling, just bring it up to 72˚C (161.5˚F). Boiling will most probably affect the taste.

I tried a cider much like this one -- apple juice, ale yeast and some added sugar. It turned out too sweet after fermentation was done, so I added some wine yeast to munch on the remaining sugar. I now have several bottles of bone-dry apple wine which may or may not be drinkable within a year or two...

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Old 06-06-2006, 06:54 PM   #9
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Default Risk taker.

My best cider has come from fresh pressed cider (no preservatives, not pasturized).
I used no yeast (the cider has its own) and wait 2 weeks for primary, 2 months for secondary, and 6 months conditioning.

Many people stray away from this due to it being 'risky'.

2 batches and no problems.

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Old 06-06-2006, 07:19 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42
It's really that simple, except most of my ciders ferment down to 0.995 or so using ale yeasts. I've tried using a sweet mead yeast, the cider dried out anyway. There are cider yeasts, I haven't tried one.
Cider yeasts are even worse. It's really hard to get a cider that is sweet and carbonated. I've been thinking about using artificial (non-fermentable) sweeteners. It's just I hate to use something so unnatural in my home made alcohol.

I've used just plain apple juice from the store and some brown sugar to make a bone dry, very strong cider. It doesn't have to be non-pastuerized.
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