Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Cider Forum > Get ready for the rebirth of cider in America.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-14-2010, 11:23 AM   #11
gratus fermentatio
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Montana
Posts: 8,391
Liked 723 Times on 505 Posts
Likes Given: 1814

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CandleWineProject View Post
I myself want to open a cidery and get on board that rebirth.

There is a man from Olympia, WA who has been mapping out ciders in North America. Check http://oldtimecider.com/north-americ...r-map-project/ to see what ciders might be brewing near you.
Opening a cidery is a dream I share. BTW, Old Timey Dave is a member on this site. Regards, GF.
__________________
gratus fermentatio is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-14-2010, 01:47 PM   #12
CandleWineProject
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 593
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yan View Post
Now if western Canada could do the same... what gets called cider in BC isn't cider at all, usually.
Ah, you would be referring to Wyder. Honestly, if it comes in a six pack, it probably was made from concentrate with sugar. It's got to have the cider apples!

I haven't had a chance to try it, but I know out on Vancouver Island there is Sea Cider. http://www.seacider.ca/news.html. I don't know what they use or anything other than they are there.

Old Time Cider indicates there are two others in BC. http://oldtimecider.com/north-americ...r-map-project/
__________________
CandleWineProject is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-14-2010, 03:11 PM   #13
Yan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 168
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CandleWineProject View Post
Ah, you would be referring to Wyder. Honestly, if it comes in a six pack, it probably was made from concentrate with sugar. It's got to have the cider apples!

I haven't had a chance to try it, but I know out on Vancouver Island there is Sea Cider. http://www.seacider.ca/news.html. I don't know what they use or anything other than they are there.

Old Time Cider indicates there are two others in BC. http://oldtimecider.com/north-americ...r-map-project/
No, much worse. Alcopops get called cider by the BC liquor monopoly, and I'm aware of those cideries, but they don't sell their product in any BC liquor stores. According to the product guide, Weston's gets sold here, but I've never seen it.

I find some eating apples make excellent ciders tastewise, just that they are a bit more of a pain to scrat and press because of their texture. Some varieties like spartan or braeburn make very good tasting cider if blended with other apples. Braeburn is even good on it's own, and has a texture that isn't too hard to work with. The problem with the region I live in is that it is very dry and hot, rather unlike England where most of the cider varieties seem to come from. My boss tried a row out of golden russets, and the trees look bloody miserable.
__________________
Yan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-14-2010, 03:19 PM   #14
CandleWineProject
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 593
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yan View Post
I find some eating apples make excellent ciders tastewise, just that they are a bit more of a pain to scrat and press because of their texture. Some varieties like spartan or braeburn make very good tasting cider if blended with other apples. Braeburn is even good on it's own, and has a texture that isn't too hard to work with. The problem with the region I live in is that it is very dry and hot, rather unlike England where most of the cider varieties seem to come from. My boss tried a row out of golden russets, and the trees look bloody miserable.
True. Red Barn Cider makes a good semi-sweet Jonagold cider that I really like, and I recently bought a Granny Smith cider that I have yet to open. Myself - I've been buying fresh juice made from Red & Yellow Delicious, Braeburn, and Fiji, and the last two aren't really considered traditional cider apples, partly because the breed is so young that nobody has really experimented with it.

But you got to admit - a cider made from fresh juice with no sugar or water added tastes far better than something made from concentrate.
__________________
CandleWineProject is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-14-2010, 06:38 PM   #15
gregbathurst
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 845
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yan View Post
The problem with the region I live in is that it is very dry and hot, rather unlike England where most of the cider varieties seem to come from. My boss tried a row out of golden russets, and the trees look bloody miserable.
Dry regions are actually better for growing apples because disease problems are less and you won't have the usual insects. What you need is some deep soil and a bit of irrigation for summer, spring frosts might be more of a problem.
Cider apples may have originated in England but the apple industry there is in pretty bad shape. One big problem in the cider world is the flood of cheap, low quality concentrate from china, which produces more apples than the rest of the world combined.
__________________
gregbathurst is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-14-2010, 07:14 PM   #16
CandleWineProject
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 593
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I highly recommend Apples for the 21st Century. Not exactly a cider apple book, but the author talks about his personal experience growing that particular apple in Oregon, Minnasota, and references other places. It doesn't feel so much like a text book where they say, "Zones 4-9, except is wet" and you are like, "But wait, my region isn't wet or dry. Will it still work for me?"

__________________
CandleWineProject is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-15-2010, 02:00 AM   #17
Yan
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 168
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregbathurst View Post
Dry regions are actually better for growing apples because disease problems are less and you won't have the usual insects. What you need is some deep soil and a bit of irrigation for summer, spring frosts might be more of a problem.
Cider apples may have originated in England but the apple industry there is in pretty bad shape. One big problem in the cider world is the flood of cheap, low quality concentrate from china, which produces more apples than the rest of the world combined.
I know all about the merits of hot dry regions for apple growing. I've been working in apple orchards here in the interior of BC year round for a mighty long time, and will probably go until my body quits on me, so I've seen a lot of stuff get tried out, and I've seen the difference in many varieties being grown in different parts. It can be a night and day difference. Some are just not well suited for the climate, like cortlands, macintosh and spartan (even though people grow them) and stuff like honeycrisp. When conditions are too hot and dry calcium is depleted from the fruit and bitter pit happens, which renders the fruit unmarketable (and very, very ugly), and without morning dew and cold nights macintosh and spartan won't colour the way they will elsewhere, where conditions are cooler and more moist. Cortland aren't even grown here because of this, and even braeburn and fuji have problems with bitter pit. What I am worried about with English apples mostly is bitter pit. Also, the season here is somewhat shorter. The last stuff gets picked in November, where I believe the season can go into december in england.

We have the same problem over here with the Chinese competition, but it's only really a problem for juice apples, which are basically anything too crappy for market or packing. Also, silly new pseudo-hygeine laws (as activist Vandana Shiva calls them) are making it impossible for farmers in Canada, particularly organic farmers to sell their windfallen apples for juice. There is no danger of e. coli in fully rotted manure. It's ridiculous.
__________________
Yan is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-15-2010, 08:04 AM   #18
gregbathurst
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 845
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yan View Post

Also, silly new pseudo-hygeine laws (as activist Vandana Shiva calls them) are making it impossible for farmers in Canada, particularly organic farmers to sell their windfallen apples for juice. There is no danger of e. coli in fully rotted manure. It's ridiculous.
I have had arguments with Cvillekevin on this forum about the safety of windfall apples, in England the traditional time to harvest cider apples is when 1/3 of the crop has fallen, the rest are then shaken to the ground and swept up by harvesters. Many people now have a distrust of nature and believe anything that touches the ground must be poisoned. A very sad state of affairs.

Sorry, I thought you were talking about apples in general, its very true in my experience that different varieties are good in different climates. I have a bramleys and the fruit always gets cooked and sunburnt in the hot weather, yet it is the most popular variety in england. I have an American variety, twenty ounce, that does very well for me and seems to love the heat.
Colour is always a big issue for apple growers, but doesn't matter for cider along with other cosmetic issues. here in Australia consumers won't buy striped apples. I'm planning to grow about 40 trees, widely spaced on seedling stock, to try and sell a couple of thousand litres each year.
__________________
gregbathurst is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-15-2010, 09:47 AM   #19
Teromous
Beer Gnome
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Teromous's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
Posts: 2,465
Liked 274 Times on 169 Posts
Likes Given: 47

Default

What are the laws of selling cider in Australia? Is there a limit on the quantity?

__________________
Teromous is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-15-2010, 02:36 PM   #20
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,651
Liked 133 Times on 126 Posts

Default

Funny how things change. The idea of eating apples only goes back to WW1, before than almost all apples in the USA were used for cider or cooking. Part of that is apples don't breed true, but you can make cider out of almost any apple.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is my cider ready? Western93 Cider Forum 3 01-06-2010 01:29 AM
Getting ready for my 1st cider and ?s Fireguy Cider Forum 27 08-19-2009 02:49 AM
Rebirth of Brooklyn Craft Beers BoxofRain General Beer Discussion 7 10-30-2008 08:42 PM
Is my Cider Ready? lostforatime Cider Forum 3 11-17-2006 03:37 PM
getting ready to try cider! RookieBrew Cider Forum 12 06-11-2006 12:53 AM