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Old 01-18-2008, 03:00 AM   #1
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Default Fermenting Temperature

I just started my very first batch of cider (or any thing) this week in my basement. The basement temperature is around 64 degrees. Through research this week This seems to be below the temperature that most yeasts are "supposed to be" fermenting at.

Now my question, it is better to ferment at lower temperatures or higher ones?

I see that there are "heating belts" for fermenters that warm the must to 72F. Is that the "Ideal" temperature? (I am using a light bulb under my fermenter on a stand to attempt to warm it up.)

Thanks for the responses in advance
CR

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Old 01-18-2008, 03:27 AM   #2
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CiderRat,
I just brewed (or am in the process of brewing) my first batch of cider. I've been fermenting in both the primary and secondary at 65f. Bubbled like a son of a gun in primary and is still burping in secondary. I don't know about your yeast as I used a champagne yeast, but sounds ok. Are you getting any bubbling?
Bob

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Old 01-18-2008, 09:24 AM   #3
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Bob -
It took a two of days after pitching the yeast of waiting but it finally started bubbling like a banshee.
CR

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Old 01-18-2008, 10:06 PM   #4
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LOL!
Yup, if it is anything like mine, it will not stop for a while.
Sit back and relax.
Bob

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Old 01-19-2008, 05:42 AM   #5
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65 isn't too cold really, but it is on the lower end of most wine yeasts (below 60 and you might start having problems). If anything, it just means a slower fermentation, with a more 'earthy' flavor. I would be careful using a light to heat with, first the basic electric/fire hazards, as well as light pollution disturbing your brew.

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Old 01-19-2008, 01:54 PM   #6
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Mike -
The Light is plugged into a GFI. So, I have the fire/ life hazard covered.

"Light pollution disturbing the brew" can you explain this.

Thanks
CR

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Old 01-19-2008, 04:11 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CiderRat
Mike -
The Light is plugged into a GFI. So, I have the fire/ life hazard covered.

"Light pollution disturbing the brew" can you explain this.

Thanks
CR
While it is well known that light causes hops oil to break down (skunking your brew), some people also believe that it effects wines in somewhat the same way. Depending on the wine you are making, it could effect the color and possibly the taste. While I am not 100% sure either way myself, I prefer to err on the safe side, and keep all my stuff in a dark corner of the house. You may want to check into a Brew Belt (for buckets & better bottles) or a FermWrap (for glass carboys) from your LHBS if you want to keep the brew warmer than room temp.
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Old 01-19-2008, 04:14 PM   #8
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Wines and ciders don't skunk, but they do have some unpleasant effects from light. They will actually change color. I can't remember the chemistry behind it (I think David_42 actually posted what happens to wines and light) but I keep all my wines, beers, ciders, mead, etc. covered and out of direct light.

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Old 01-19-2008, 05:34 PM   #9
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Thanks. That is useful information.
CiderRat

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Old 01-22-2008, 03:00 PM   #10
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With the temp going down in NJ, I've been looking into buying the Brewing belt. The supply houses say that the instructions that come with the belt say "Do not use on glass carboys" Two follow up questions:
1) Why not?

2) Has any one ever used it on glass carboys, what cautions do you suggest?

Thanks in advance.
CiderRat

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