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Old 08-15-2012, 12:14 AM   #531
irchowi
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Originally Posted by CollegeCider View Post
From what Ive heard the reason wine bottles arent used is because they are weaker then beer bottles, as they are not made to hold carbonated liquids, so they limit you that way. If you want a still cider, I think they would be fine, but they are more prone to bursting from carbonation.
Oh I see. The reason I ask is because I like the classy look of a wine bottle + cork as opposed to a beer and cap set up.

Does anyone know if this method works well with Edwort's apfelwein? I'm making a 5 gallon batch of it right now and from what I understand, it is supposed to be a relatively dry cider. If I'm looking for a carbonated, semi-sweet version, how would I go about doing this?
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Old 08-15-2012, 05:19 AM   #532
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I'm glad I didn't start a new threadBecause my question fits with irchowi.
If I rack and cold crash for a couple weeks and then bottle, and put the bottles down where it's cooler with a tester pop bottle and if they aren't buidling pressure, can I expect just a lil carbing from stovetop? I'm sure it would be safer and not as carbed. But kinda curious if it will carb up lightly/safely and heck, maybe irchowi's wine bottles with corks could handle the moderate pressure?

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Old 08-15-2012, 05:29 AM   #533
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Yeah about the testing bottle. The idea is to bottle some of the cider in regular plastic bottles and then open them periodically until one of them reaches the desired level of carbonation? And when that happens it's safe to assume that the cider that's properly bottled with a beer and cap setup will have the same desired carbonation and we can begin pasteurization?

I'm assuming when you prime the cider with sugar, the amount of sugar is meant for both carbonation and sweetness and the ratio of carb to sweetness is decided on when you stop fermentation in the bottles? I've been seeing some say 3/4 cup of corn sugar per 5 gallons. What can I expect with this?

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Old 08-15-2012, 05:37 AM   #534
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Forgot to add that I like to carefully do my first rack/coldcrash at 1.015-1.020 and let it clear more while cold. Almost seems that my high-flocculating ale yeasts that I like to use are almost all gone come bottling time since they're taking awhile to carb up in the basement. Plus not adding any chems nor even backsweetening keeps it simple.

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Old 08-15-2012, 05:52 AM   #535
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I'm wondering if my "lightly" carbed bottles get a little "more" carbed from the pressure/heat in the end. I love my 1L swingtops that work awesome in my fridge, but not ideal for stovetop. Which is why I simply haven't haven't tried it. Just curious if the carb level bumps up after the stovetop past.

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Old 08-20-2012, 04:54 PM   #536
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Can you stovetop pasteurize PET plastic bottles?

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Old 08-22-2012, 12:04 AM   #537
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Can you stovetop pasteurize PET plastic bottles?
From what I understand, the PET Better Bottles (I'm guessing that is what you are referring to) are rated to 60°C (140°F). Which I believe is too low for pasteurizing. Anyone else?
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Old 08-22-2012, 02:30 AM   #538
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcevoy
Can you stovetop pasteurize PET plastic bottles?
I believe he is referring to the soda bottle-type. Like the kind that accompany a Mr. Beer setup. Regardless, typical PET has a glass transition temp ranging from about 60 to 80 C (140 - 178 F) depending upon the process used to create the bottle. Above this temp the bottles can soften and begin to fail. I would avoid heating them above this temp if they are already pressurized. You might get away with using a slightly lower temp for a longer period of time, but I have never tried it.
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Old 08-24-2012, 12:04 AM   #539
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I read some people pasteurize in their oven instead of the stovetop method. Oven sounds safer, better to control 190 degree temp, and easier since I don't have a larger pot. Any thoughts? Pasteurizating this weekend for the first time this weekend. Wish me luck !

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Old 08-24-2012, 05:53 AM   #540
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vox
I read some people pasteurize in their oven instead of the stovetop method. Oven sounds safer, better to control 190 degree temp, and easier since I don't have a larger pot. Any thoughts? Pasteurizating this weekend for the first time this weekend. Wish me luck !
Personally, I consider the stovetop a safer method. If you do have a bottle blow, the water will go a long way to absorbing much of the energy, slowing down the potential shrapnel. In addition, most of the "damage" will be confined to the pot. Although the oven provides a strong physical barrier between you and the "bomb," my oven has a glass window in the front and with my luck this would be cracked or broken. This would make SWMBO extremely irritable...certainly not a safe situation.
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