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Old 09-04-2010, 02:26 AM   #31
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This won't work with EC-1118 or Red Star P Cuvee. I've done this process, with cider, actually left it longer than that, and still ended up with foam fountains when I opened the bottles for consumption, weeks later. I suggest a person do a test bottle filled with water, uncapped, with a thermometer inside the bottle, and in the pot of hot water, and see how long it takes to get to 140 inside the bottle. If it takes 20 minutes, then go for 30 when you are doing the real thing.

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Old 09-04-2010, 03:50 AM   #32
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Champagne yeasts are tough to stop with cold temps. They may be more resistant at high temps as well. Ale yeast seem to be easier to stop.

Great post Jim! - I agree that this should be stickied. This is the most thorough post by far on bottle pasteurization, although others have reported good success as well.

For someone wanting to bottle carbonate a sweet cider, this seems to me like the most reliable way to go. I still prefer cold crashing and kegging, but lots of people dont have space for that. If you need more throughput you can use a keggle.

A programmable dishwasher would be the way to go. Just do a heat cycle, have it bring the temp up nice and slow and then hold for 30 min, bring it down slow, you could run a good sized batch of bottles in an hour with very little effort other than figuring out how to program the dishwasher.

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Old 09-07-2010, 03:10 AM   #33
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For someone wanting to bottle carbonate a sweet cider, this seems to me like the most reliable way to go. I still prefer cold crashing and kegging, but lots of people dont have space for that. If you need more throughput you can use a keggle.
Kegging (and cold crashing) is a great option, but as you say, Kevin, not every one wants to keg.

When I was in Denmark this summer, at Ribe Brewery, they had a low-tech piece of equipment to pasteurize all their bottles. It worked just like the stove top method, just bigger. It was a large metal box with a shelf (with holes) in it. You stacked the bottles on the shelf, closed the lid, filled the box with either steam or hot water (I don't recall), open the lid and take out the bottles.

You can see it in the background of this picture, behind my son on the right.

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Old 09-09-2010, 11:10 PM   #34
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Rather then pasteurize, you could cold-crash, but I don't have the refrigerator space for that and also can't give bottles away to other people using that method.
Why does the cold crash method stops you from giving away bottles ?
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Old 09-10-2010, 01:15 AM   #35
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Hmmm, well I guess it wouldn't necessarily, Naeco. But, taking them out of the fridge, transporting them, or giving them to someone and trusting that they will put them in the fridge very soon, allows sometime, perhaps, for the yeast to warm up and start to do their work again. But you're right, you could keep them in a cooler and give explicit instructions to your friends to refrigerate immediately.

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Old 09-10-2010, 01:26 AM   #36
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If you do the cold crash right you dont have to worry about keeping the bottles refrigerated. I give away bottles all the time and never had a problem. I still have about 100 bottles in the basement from last season that made it through the hottest summer on record with no AC (temps 80+ in the basement)

Dont confuse chilling the bottles with cold crashing. Just chilling an active ferment will cause the yeast to go dormant, but they will start back up again when they warm up. Cold crashing to remove the yeast requires two rackings, one before the chill and one right afterwards, so that all the yeast stay behind on the 2nd rack. If you use ale yeast, crash at 1.020 or preferably lower and dont suck up any yeast on the 2nd rack, they will stay stable indefinitely.

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Old 09-10-2010, 01:36 AM   #37
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If you do the cold crash right you dont have to worry about keeping the bottles refrigerated. I give away bottles all the time and never had a problem. I still have about 100 bottles in the basement from last season that made it through the hottest summer on record with no AC (temps 80+ in the basement)

Dont confuse chilling the bottles with cold crashing. Just chilling an active ferment will cause the yeast to go dormant, but they will start back up again when they warm up. Cold crashing to remove the yeast requires two rackings, one before the chill and one right afterwards, so that all the yeast stay behind on the 2nd rack. If you use ale yeast, crash at 1.020 or preferably lower and dont suck up any yeast on the 2nd rack, they will stay stable indefinitely.
Right. I was assuming he was talking about bottle conditioning/carbonating, not kegging or force carbing. So you can't remove all the yeast via racking before you bottle. Or am I missing the point? And it is helpful to distinguish between cold crashing and chilling bottles, thanks.
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Old 09-10-2010, 07:01 AM   #38
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Yes for someone who wants to bottle condition, cold crashing doesnt work well. Pasteurization is the way to go.

If you cold crash you can bottle non-carbonated cider also. I do that a lot. It doesnt require a keg, just a way to chill the cider, so its less work and still tastes great.

Pasteurization does seem inherently less risky than cold crashing. Another advantage is that it should work fine for lager yeasts. Most of the lager yeasts I have tried have been really good but hard/impossible to crash.

BTW - cool picture. What is that contraption to the left of your son?

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Old 09-10-2010, 11:19 AM   #39
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That's a bottling machine! I've never seen one like it. It holds six 22 oz bottles at a time, the operator pulls a lever down and the bottles are slowly filled and automatically stop at the right level. Then they cap it by hand with a bench capper. There are more pictures and descriptions here http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/visi...photos-188183/

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Old 09-10-2010, 02:00 PM   #40
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Thanks guys, how long would I have to keep a champagne bottle in the 190 degree water for it to be pasteurized and did we get a definitive answer to the dishwasher pasteurization ?

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