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-   -   Easy Stove-Top Pasteurizing - With Pics (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f32/easy-stove-top-pasteurizing-pics-193295/)

CorgiBrew 02-02-2011 05:38 PM

Ka Boom!
 
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A couple of weeks ago, I posted that I was planning to try the pasteurization process in my eHERMS. It was a great idea, but in the meantime my bottles had, apparently, warmed up a bit (I was keeping them well chilled in the fridge, but needed the fridge for other purposes), resumed fermenting, and 9 of the 12 bottles ended up blowing up like cider-grenades when I brought them up to temp. All of the explosions in the basement got some raised eyebrows from the wife and definitely woke the dog, but all was safely contained in my keggle. In case you're wondering, though, this is what one of those babies looked after processing. Obviously, as others have observed, there's enough force and shrapnel here to do some real damage. So, caveat emptor!


complexgeek 10-01-2011 12:13 PM

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I'm new to cider brewing (and homebrewing in general), but decided to give your technique for a sweet, carbonated cider a try.

Being somewhat scared of exploding bottles (and wanting to save the initial expense of a capper) I decided to use PET bottles. In the first batch I pasteurized all the seals failed and the carbonation was lost. In the second batch I tried heating the caps before tightening them. This time all but one failed. The one that didn't is in the attached picture...

I think for this technique to be successful I'll need to switch to glass bottles.


dmulligan 04-16-2012 05:58 AM

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daze
reading what you said the carb level should not have been to much, so there must be another cause and I think it may in part be what you said below

That just might be part of problem right there, I turn the heat off once the water reaches 175. The problem with having the heat on is the bottom of the pot will be hotter than the top and inconsistent heat is not good for glass.

I got to thinking about your head space theory and it too may be part of the issue. how much head space did you have between the top of the liquid and the cap?? I recently pasteurized some root beer and i filled it to the base of the neck. once the bottles got up to temp the root beer had risen almost 3/4" up the neck so head space may be a major factor. I know it is critical in canning so it makes sense it would be important in bottling as well. Also makes sense as liquids do not compress with pressure but air will so more head space means you are less likely to break bottles.
My bottles were not in direct contact with the bottom of the pot so I didn't think that heating the water at that point would matter. I guess I was wrong.

So I definitely needed to start with hotter pot water and hotter bottles out of the sink. Then I needed to not heat the water, perhaps I needed to pasteurize a little longer if my water temp dropped too much.

I filled my bottles with a wine filling wand and used it to judge how much to fill each bottle. That meant that I had very little space left. How much room should I have left? The entire neck?

Here is a pic of one of my 660mL bottle bombs.

D

MarkKF 06-13-2012 05:07 PM

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So easy. Just finished two cases - 48 bottles of Apple-cranberry Cider.

But, I forgot to turn off the heat on my last six bottles. The temp never got over 190-200 deg. but the bottle temp was
definitely higher when done. No explosions but I'm interested to see if they are any different in taste or appearance.


MarkKF 08-24-2012 05:10 PM

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I use my wife's pasta pan and put the top on it. I drop a thermometer thru the vent hole to keep an eye on temp. If there is a blow up there's only a narrow window of danger.


Archer 01-30-2013 04:29 PM

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Thank you, Papers. I already have an Archer avatar from the show for when I upgrade my membership here.

I will ask my local HBS if there is anything I can do for clarification; maybe I just need to be more patient. Would you happen to know if its better to age the cider either 1) in the 1 gallon carboys before bottling, etc. or 2) going ahead with bottling to 12 oz beer bottles, carbonating, pastuerizing, and then aging?


Archer 02-18-2013 07:45 PM

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Pappers, So you have diluted your original 3 gallons...what does that do to your alcohol content? Any way to predict this? I have 3 gallons of pretty high (9%?) alcohol content in secondary that is now down to 1.000, and I'd likle to end up at about 5-6% after back sweetening. How do I figure out how much juice to add on the back end?


Archer 02-18-2013 08:43 PM

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I may have stumbled across the answer on another post...

To calculate the change in ABV by adding water:

(original volume * alcohol percentage) / new volume

if you added half a gallon water to 3 gal of 8.46% ABV:
3 * 0.0846 / 3.5 = 7.41% ABV

If I sweeten with apple juice or concentrate and pastuerize before it ferments, then wouldn't that be like adding water?


fizgig 03-27-2013 04:24 AM

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Bottle bombs while pasteurizing or afterwards?

Here's my process, first time, I hope yours weren't after...

I went from 1.071 to 1.027 over 4 days using a variant of the sweet country cider recipe here, I modified it with 2 gallons of apple juice (it was 1.044 out of the jug) and half a dozen fresh juiced granny smith apples and about 20oz of brown sugar, some pectic enzyme, some yeast nutrient, yeast energizer and rehydrated nottingham.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f81/5-da...-cider-265986/

1.040 seemed too sweet so I let it go longer (I think all that tasting screwed up my stomach, ugh.), still seemed a tad too sweet at 1.027 but it was getting too boozy to let it go longer. I cold crashed it overnight on my screened in back porch at about 35 degrees. I bottled last night around 7:00pm from the cold crash, then immediately stored in the basement to carb at 60 degrees. I made 1 bottle a 20oz plastic pop bottle I squeezed a bit as I capped it to keep it slack. I checked it this morning and the 20oz felt about half carbed, I checked it after dinner and it felt like a new pop bottle and was stiff, so I pasteurized them all exactly according to the directions in this thread, 190 degrees for 10 minutes, the temp only went down to 170 in my pot, the bottles according to my laser thermometer stayed at 150+ for quite some time after.

Pics attached, all of the bottles have pretty much the same normal headspace but the hot bottles on the cutting board have all different levels depending on when I pulled them out, I used a filling wand.


fizgig 03-27-2013 04:24 AM

3 Attachment(s)

Bottle bombs while pasteurizing or afterwards?

Here's my process, first time, I hope yours weren't after...

I went from 1.071 to 1.027 over 4 days using a variant of the sweet country cider recipe here, I modified it with 2 gallons of apple juice (it was 1.044 out of the jug) and half a dozen fresh juiced granny smith apples and about 20oz of brown sugar, some pectic enzyme, some yeast nutrient, yeast energizer and rehydrated nottingham.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f81/5-da...-cider-265986/

1.040 seemed too sweet so I let it go longer (I think all that tasting screwed up my stomach, ugh.), still seemed a tad too sweet at 1.027 but it was getting too boozy to let it go longer. I cold crashed it overnight on my screened in back porch at about 35 degrees. I bottled last night around 7:00pm from the cold crash, then immediately stored in the basement to carb at 60 degrees. I made 1 bottle a 20oz plastic pop bottle I squeezed a bit as I capped it to keep it slack. I checked it this morning and the 20oz felt about half carbed, I checked it after dinner and it felt like a new pop bottle and was stiff, so I pasteurized them all exactly according to the directions in this thread, 190 degrees for 10 minutes, the temp only went down to 170 in my pot, the bottles according to my laser thermometer stayed at 150+ for quite some time after.

Pics attached, all of the bottles have pretty much the same normal headspace but the hot bottles on the cutting board have all different levels depending on when I pulled them out, I used a filling wand.



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