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Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Cider Forum > Can I Backsweeten AND Bottle Prime?
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Old 12-22-2008, 09:40 PM   #11
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hmm.

i had no idea there were two splendas.
i bought a box @ the grocery store, and looked at the ingredients, hence my post above. this one was for like coffee or tea, little .5 gram bags.

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Old 12-22-2008, 11:24 PM   #12
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Granular slenda does not contain dextrose. The other contains such small amounts that I doubt it can cause a bottle bomb. There is one type of splenda that is blended with sugar. It is noted on the package and that could cause a problem.

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Old 12-23-2008, 01:24 AM   #13
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Sucralose - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 12-23-2008, 01:44 AM   #14
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Personally I can taste Splenda, and it's not a good thing. Stevia is more hit or miss - too easy to overdo, at which point it's horrid, but can be acceptable (to me) in small enough amounts.

However, given a lack of fancy equipment, the easy solution to this problem with simple equipment (and real sugars) is to sweeten and bottle, test bottles until you get the carbonation you want (starting with a plastic bottle or two to let your know some of that without opening any) and then pasteurizing the sealed bottles in a hot water bath to kill the yeast.

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Old 12-23-2008, 03:03 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ecnerwal View Post
Personally I can taste Splenda, and it's not a good thing. Stevia is more hit or miss - too easy to overdo, at which point it's horrid, but can be acceptable (to me) in small enough amounts.

However, given a lack of fancy equipment, the easy solution to this problem with simple equipment (and real sugars) is to sweeten and bottle, test bottles until you get the carbonation you want (starting with a plastic bottle or two to let your know some of that without opening any) and then pasteurizing the sealed bottles in a hot water bath to kill the yeast.
Now there's an interesting idea.... How exactly would I do that? Put full (carbonated) bottles in water and heat to 170deg or so? Wouldn't that cause them to explode?

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Old 12-23-2008, 03:16 AM   #16
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I,ve asked about this before and never seem to get an answer from one who has actually done it. If you have successfullly done this please give me the details. I've read that you put it in H20 and bring it up tp 160 degrees and hold it for 3 iminutes and then take it out to cool. Some say bring it to a boil and pull it out of the bath right away. My concern is how the heat will change the taste of the cider.

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Old 12-23-2008, 03:45 AM   #17
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[QUOTE=BrewOnBoard;1023728]Now there's an interesting idea.... How exactly would I do that? Put full (carbonated) bottles in water and heat to 170deg or so? Wouldn't that cause them to explode?

If it did, most commercial beer would never get off the assembly line. It's filled, capped, and then sprayed with hot water for a sufficient time to pasteurize it, at least according to some bit of TeeVee documentary I wasted a few brain cells on watching. After that they put the labels on. I think the brewery in question was Yuengling.

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Old 12-23-2008, 11:30 PM   #18
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I am thinking about the same thing... Carbed and sweetened cider. I was planning on priming sugar and lactose at the same time just prior to bottling. I just don't know how much lactose to add for my 3 gallon batch and whether or not this is the right way to go about sweetening?

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Old 12-23-2008, 11:45 PM   #19
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That is the right way to go about sweetening a bottle carbed brew. For lactose, because everyone is different, take out a measured sample, say 4 oz. Add some lactose to that until it is the sweetness you like. Then you just calculate how much lactose would be equivalent for the whole batch, add it and you're good to drink!

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Old 12-24-2008, 12:01 AM   #20
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Thank you Tusch for the quick response. I only have 4oz. of lactose so I may be picking up some more or only sweetening part of the batch (1.5-2 gallons) depending on "my taste".

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