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Old 11-09-2011, 12:05 AM   #1
smh
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Default Bottling gravity

So, I've just made my first cider. Pretty simple recipe:

10L of cider that I added pectic enzyme to overnight.
I brought to SG=1.056 with white sugar added 1-2 tsp of nutrient and pitched a package of Danstar Nottingham yeast.

I checked SG after 1 week I pulled it off the lees and it was 1.004, then a week after that it was 1.000. I was kind of impatient, so I bottled at this point in Stella and old glass pop bottles. It was somewhat carbed, but not overly so.

I ran a cycle in my dishwasher to attempt pasturizing, but I'm almost certain that it wasn't hot enough (I used the stove-top method stickied here for another batch, and that felt much hotter when I pulled it out than when the dishwasher finished).

I will certainly test after its been in the bottle for a week. Any reason that I should be worried? Should I test more frequently? I want to leave as much to age as possible.

Thanks!

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Old 11-09-2011, 01:30 AM   #2
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I have broken bottles in the past and lost a few corks. I cold crashed my last batch. It was fully primed so I put it in my root cellar which worked great until the Heat Wave!! I did manage to rescue most of them.

I have a batch on the go right now that just got the yeast 10 mins ago. I want to try pasteurizing this batch too, but a few Brew Masters have told me not to bother, that I should just cold crash them as well. The one guy that did tell me to do it suggested putting the bottles on a 10 minute rolling boil which he states should be enough to kill the yeast.

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Old 11-09-2011, 01:32 AM   #3
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These are just sitting in my apartment right now. It's 21degrees celsius (about 70). I dont' have much option for other places to put this.

I didn't want to cold crash since I also don't have enough room to store it in the cold.

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Old 11-09-2011, 01:41 AM   #4
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Since you didn't actually prime the bottles with any extra sugar than you shouldn't have a problem. What carbonated your cider was residual sugars left over from fermenting. One Brew Master I spoke with finishes his fermenting in his bottles to prime them, sort of like in your case. He bottles at 1.004 SG to achieve carbonation. Once the sugar is gone it stops fermenting. I think you will be fine since your SG was 1.000

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Old 11-09-2011, 01:44 AM   #5
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Thats what I figured, just not certain how far Nottingham will take it down. For example, if it could drop it 10 more points, what can the bottles handle?

I'm sure many people here will warn agains finishing fermentation in the bottle. Unless you're doing things under essentially identical (i.e. industrial) conditions, I expect it's hard to control precisely.

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Old 11-09-2011, 01:44 AM   #6
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Yup, bottling at SG 1.000 after having fermented at 70* should produce a moderate amount of carbonation with little likelihood of hand grenades.

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Old 11-09-2011, 01:51 AM   #7
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Out of curiosity, what relation does the fermentation temp have to the SG drop after bottling?

I would assume that depending on the optimal temperature for the yeast just means that it will ferment out faster. Does that temperature have anything to do beyond that (flavour development aside)?

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Old 11-09-2011, 02:24 AM   #8
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The SG drop after bottling? ... As long as the temp is not below the yeast's tolerance, no noteworthy effect on the SG, per se.

However, before bottling, lower temperatures during fermentation cause more CO2 to dissolve into the must ... higher temperatures less.
When determining how much sugar (etc) to prime something with to add carbonation, your CO2 figures first take into account the amount of CO2 assumed to be in the fermented must/wort/"green beer" already, based on fermentation temperature and the level of de-gassing that may have taken place due to handling, etc. Initial fermentation can account for up to 20% to 30% or so of the total carbonation. Then, you add priming sugar to make up the shortfall in CO2/carbonation to the carbonation preference you've decided upon for that beverage.

My previous comment was taking into account 1) the residual sugars at SG 1.000, and 2) an assumed amount of dissolved CO2 from the primary fermentation at 70* already dissolved in the must. The two combined would likely only amount to total CO2 of around 2.5 or so volumes (very approximately). No explosive ordinance there.

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