New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermeneter!

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Mead Forum > What to do about my first mead?




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-12-2011, 02:36 PM   #1
Homercidal
Moderator
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Homercidal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Reed City, MI
Posts: 22,066
Liked 1651 Times on 1198 Posts
Likes Given: 940

Default What to do about my first mead?

I made a mead last year. My first. I used some cheap honey from the local bakery, source unknown. I shall consider the effort a success, despite the result. I learned a lot about the fermentation process. However, there are a few points I'd like to make about the mead and see what I can do with it:

The carboy sat in my computer for a while with no cover, then I put a black T-shirt over it.

I let the airlock dry out from sheer stupidity (I've been homebrewing for HOW LONG??) I guess I never thought too much about it because beer never sits long enough for the vodka to dry up!

There was something on top that kind of looked like pellicle. Upon closer inspection, it looked like very old bubbles that never sank.

Aroma was pretty alcoholic, even though I think I started this MANY months ago.

Taste is very dry with still quite a bit of alcohol presence. Not really my favorite kind of mead. It's more like a strong, unrefined dry wine.

With a lack of airlock liquid I kind of expected some oxidation. I did not look for it when tasting though, so I can' say whether it's there or not.

Considering the cost of the honey and the amount of time put into it, I'm hesitant to just throw it out. However, it's pretty dry for my tastes, and I'm not sure I know anyone who would like it, since it's a dry mead.

How should I bottle it if I decide to keep it?

Can I backsweeten without restarting fermentation, and will it be tasty that way?



__________________
Homercidal is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-12-2011, 02:47 PM   #2
huesmann
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kensington, MD
Posts: 755
Liked 22 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

If you're sure the yeast has petered out, sure you can backsweeten. Have you cold crashed? Did you sulfite/sorbate?



__________________
huesmann is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-12-2011, 03:14 PM   #3
Homercidal
Moderator
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Homercidal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Reed City, MI
Posts: 22,066
Liked 1651 Times on 1198 Posts
Likes Given: 940

Default

I did not use anything but water, honey, yeast and yeast nutrient. And I don't know for sure if there is any living yeast. I'd rather not risk it, TBH.

I have not cold crashed. In fact, the mead is still somewhat hazy. I've seen some brilliant mead. I have not used gelatin or anything to help it along.

__________________
Homercidal is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-12-2011, 07:02 PM   #4
fatbloke
Complete nugget!
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
fatbloke's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: UK - South Coast.
Posts: 2,550
Liked 157 Times on 145 Posts
Likes Given: 20

Default

Well, I'd suggest either that you back sweeten it then clear it, or let it clear first.

If there's no off flavours (oxidation often gives a taste reminiscent of sherry), then it'd probably be better to stabilise it (sulphite and sorbate) first, then back sweeten to whatever level you like (use a hydrometer - I make mine about 1.010 to 1.015 a.k.a. medium sweet). I like to use honey, so by adding the back sweetening before it's clear, if the honey did cause a haze, I wouldn't notice it and the haze either drops out naturally, or I add finings if I'm impatient.

If you're gonna use something other than honey to back sweeten, then you can usually clear it first.

Oh, and it's probably worth checking it with a hydrometer to make sure it's finished it's ferment.

Once it's back sweetened and cleared, I like to age my meads for a minimum of 6 months, generally a year plus. So it's up to you whether you want to bulk age it (if you've enough glass to keep it in) or whether you want to get it bottled.

You don't mention what size the batch was, but it might be feasible to have some bottled as dry and some back sweetened.....

regards

fatbloke

__________________

"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away". Tom Waits.

Oh, and here's some blog stuff!

fatbloke is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mead Judging - Question about sweet traditional mead jezter6 Mead Forum 5 01-20-2014 04:00 PM
Bottling mead - Caps vs Corking mead - either method superior? WinsomeLass Mead Forum 29 05-23-2013 07:22 PM
Stark Raven Mead (burnt honey mead attempt) machinelf Mead Forum 61 01-25-2013 02:29 PM
Mead newbie question: how to make a bottle conditioned, sweet, sparkling mead? weirdboy Mead Forum 36 05-28-2010 06:24 AM
Pomegranate Orange pineapple mead! (also known as the oh, I might as well mead.) funkapottomous Mead Forum 3 05-24-2010 05:45 PM