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Old 07-08-2013, 07:02 PM   #1
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Default Unfiltered honey

I picked up 15 lbs of unfiltered(but strained) Wildflower honey from someone that sells local honey,she said that it's not pasteurized (she doesn't think) Should I add campden tablets to the primary? Also who has a good recipe for blueberry mead?.. TY

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Old 07-08-2013, 07:07 PM   #2
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I would think that as long as the solution was boiled it wouldn't matter. It may not matter anyways. I'm not 100% on that. I've seen wild yeast infect honey before, but its pretty rare. I imagine any wild yeast that is tough enough to manage infecting pure honey may also be a decent yeast for brewing.

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Old 07-08-2013, 08:58 PM   #3
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Last year I used 55 lbs of unfiltered, unprocessed, unpasteurized, unheated honey from local apiary to make various batches of mead. He just turned the valve and filled my 5 gal pail full of liquid honey from huge vessel. You can add campden if you want 24 hr prior to sanitize the must but you don't have to. I done both ways and never had problems.

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Old 07-08-2013, 09:17 PM   #4
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Never boil honey. Filtered or Pasturized honey is not ideal.

You get better flavor and better aroma with out it. Basically, Honey in it's pure honey form is antiboitic. When you thin it down with water it is not so much but at this point it doesn't matter, the yeast will out compete the spoilage critters and when it has alcohol in it it kills the spoilage critters.

Did you know that in the American Civil war they used honey on gauze to cover wounds and keep them clean?

So it is not neccessary. No campden, no boiling. Just add water, yeast, yeast nutrient.

They have even found 5000 year old honey crystalized in a tomb and found it still good for consumption.

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Old 07-09-2013, 09:49 AM   #5
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Great input... Thank you all for the answers.. How about if I add Blueberries,will the honey fight the "spoilage critters"?

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Old 07-09-2013, 01:49 PM   #6
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Short answer, yes.

Long answer: I always put my fruit in the secondary. At the point of the secondary your mead will be about 10% alcohol. That's enough to kill the little beasties normally. Putting the fruit in the primary is basically the same as not where spoilage besties are conserned. The yeast usually out competes them and by the time you drink it you will be fine. If you do put the fruit in the primary then just simply wash it and maybe put in some pectin enzyme in to break down cell walls and render the juice out better.

I normally don't worry too much about this. Mostly, sanitation of your gear is what you want. ALLWAYS sanitize your equipment prior to use. Follow this simple rule without fail and you shouldn't really have many problems. The primary problems people have with mold or the like is when they only wash their equipment prior to use. That's the #1 cause of mold or other bad spoilage critters. Also, If you use fruit make sure it is not moldy or dirty. Just a simple rinsing off the dirt and gunk and using healthy looking fruit. Now some fruits, like bannanas you do use when blackened. But over all you should be good. If you see mold in your batch then you might save it by racking under the mold and racking into a freshly sanitized carboy/brew bucket. I haven't had a batch go bad yet due to spoilage or mold.

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Old 07-09-2013, 02:26 PM   #7
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I don't think honey is "antibiotic" in nature, its just that the gravity is so high that any nasties die from osmotic stress from the sugar. No further treatment of the honey should be needed. Just sanitize all your equipment.

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Old 07-09-2013, 04:51 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matrix4b View Post
Never boil honey.
Unless you're making a bochet!
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Old 07-09-2013, 06:41 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarshmallowBlue View Post
I don't think honey is "antibiotic" in nature, its just that the gravity is so high that any nasties die from osmotic stress from the sugar. No further treatment of the honey should be needed. Just sanitize all your equipment.
No, honey does indeed, have anti-fungal and anti-bacterial/biotic properties. Its been found particularly efficacious where skin and underlying flesh are in a particularly delicate condition i.e. burns etc....
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Old 07-09-2013, 07:20 PM   #10
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Oh the things I learn.

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