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Old 05-30-2012, 07:39 PM   #21
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Mine did the same thing. Just yeast floaties, as best as I can tell.

At this point there should be enough alcohol that picking up an infection would be unlikely.
Thanks, bk0. I appreciate the feedback. I'll just let it sit awhile then
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Old 06-04-2012, 05:18 PM   #22
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So oddly enough, the mead started bubbling away yesterday... it seems like there was just a large lag time while the yeast propagated. Anyway, its going to town! =)

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Old 06-04-2012, 08:30 PM   #23
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So oddly enough, the mead started bubbling away yesterday... it seems like there was just a large lag time while the yeast propagated. Anyway, its going to town! =)
Just as an "aside", it might be worth hitting google, or at least Gotmead etc, and read up on "restarting a stuck fermentation", because that's basically what you did.

Actually you were lucky with the champagne yeast, because it'd be quite normal for there to be too much alcohol for the yeast to start.

The technique is basically some must/mead and water, rehydrate the yeast and mix it in, then slowly adding further amounts of the must/mead to it, to acclimatise the yeast so it's still active and doesn't get killed off by the presence of alcohol

Don't forget, alcohol and CO2 are the byproducts of fermentation, so it's the equivalent of dumping yeast into their own sewage........

Well done getting it going though and good luck with your batch.
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Old 06-04-2012, 08:42 PM   #24
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Just as an "aside", it might be worth hitting google, or at least Gotmead etc, and read up on "restarting a stuck fermentation", because that's basically what you did.

Actually you were lucky with the champagne yeast, because it'd be quite normal for there to be too much alcohol for the yeast to start.

The technique is basically some must/mead and water, rehydrate the yeast and mix it in, then slowly adding further amounts of the must/mead to it, to acclimatise the yeast so it's still active and doesn't get killed off by the presence of alcohol

Don't forget, alcohol and CO2 are the byproducts of fermentation, so it's the equivalent of dumping yeast into their own sewage........

Well done getting it going though and good luck with your batch.
Thank you for your thoughts! I didn't even really think about it in those terms... I'm really glad it started up again.
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Old 12-28-2013, 08:38 PM   #25
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Don't know if this thread is still active after a year and a half, but I just had basically the same thing happen. I had 5 gallons of blueberry that started with an S.G. of 114 and Unfortunately I used Lalvin D47 (second year, still learning to watch gravity and yeast strains). It dropped to 104 and seemed to have stopped. It is sweeter than I care for in a mead so I started two packets of EC-1118 and used the recommended amounts of nutrient and energizer for 5 gallons. 12 hours later the airlock was bubbling pretty good (every 3 seconds or so). 24 hours later it is about every 9 seconds.

I am shaking it occasionally and had thought about aerating with my aquarium pump. One of the earlier posts said not to worry about aerating. Would it be a BAD thing to do?

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Old 12-30-2013, 04:11 PM   #26
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Don't know if this thread is still active after a year and a half, but I just had basically the same thing happen. I had 5 gallons of blueberry that started with an S.G. of 114 and Unfortunately I used Lalvin D47 (second year, still learning to watch gravity and yeast strains). It dropped to 104 and seemed to have stopped. It is sweeter than I care for in a mead so I started two packets of EC-1118 and used the recommended amounts of nutrient and energizer for 5 gallons. 12 hours later the airlock was bubbling pretty good (every 3 seconds or so). 24 hours later it is about every 9 seconds.

I am shaking it occasionally and had thought about aerating with my aquarium pump. One of the earlier posts said not to worry about aerating. Would it be a BAD thing to do?
It depends on what you are aerating. If you are aerating your starter, then no, its not bad to aerate for the first 24 or 36 hours or so. If you are aerating your already fermented must, then yes, it is a very bad idea to do that as you risk oxidizing your mead and giving it lots of off-flavors. I am the person that started this thread, and I had great luck making a hefty starter batch with some EC-1118, yeast nutrient, and some fresh honey/water mixture that was sitting at about 1.035. Once the starter began to ferment, I added a little of my fermented mead into the starter to help the yeast acclimate. I let this ferment a little more and then added a bit more fermented mead and waited for it to acclimate. I did this a few times until I felt that I could mix the yeast into the full-strength mead without shocking it, and then I placed the yeast starter into a sanitized carboy and then racked the mead on top of it. Within 12 hours or so the entire thing was fermenting and I was able to dry it out nicely. At no point was aeration needed.

If you just pitch yeast into your must, it may or may not take and ferment. If it does, then congrats. If not, then I'd recommend doing what I described above. However, if you pitch yeast directly into the must and then try to aerate your already-fermented must, you will oxidize your mead and most likely ruin it. In short: the only time you should oxygenate fermented beverages is just prior to pitching yeast into your room-temperature wort or must, or while you are making a starter. Any other time, you risk oxidizing your beverage and making it taste like crap. I hope this helps!
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Old 12-31-2013, 02:02 PM   #27
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Thanks HBB
As I wrote i DID get the 5 gallon batch going and now two days later the airlock is bubbling every three seconds or so. It's been below zero here for acouple of days and I put the batch close to a furnace vent so it stays nice ad warm most of the time. As you said no need to aerate if it gets going.

I will be doing a first racking og a 5 gallon batch of Ken Schramm's Fall Bounty Apple Cyser today. Based on the taste of what was in the hydrometer tube I may lose a bottle to the new year

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Old 01-01-2014, 09:14 PM   #28
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Thanks HBB
As I wrote i DID get the 5 gallon batch going and now two days later the airlock is bubbling every three seconds or so. It's been below zero here for acouple of days and I put the batch close to a furnace vent so it stays nice ad warm most of the time. As you said no need to aerate if it gets going.

I will be doing a first racking og a 5 gallon batch of Ken Schramm's Fall Bounty Apple Cyser today. Based on the taste of what was in the hydrometer tube I may lose a bottle to the new year
Excellent! Happy brewing, and happy new year!
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Old 01-01-2014, 09:15 PM   #29
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Thanks HBB
As I wrote i DID get the 5 gallon batch going and now two days later the airlock is bubbling every three seconds or so. It's been below zero here for acouple of days and I put the batch close to a furnace vent so it stays nice ad warm most of the time. As you said no need to aerate if it gets going.

I will be doing a first racking og a 5 gallon batch of Ken Schramm's Fall Bounty Apple Cyser today. Based on the taste of what was in the hydrometer tube I may lose a bottle to the new year
Excellent! Happy brewing, and happy new year! I hope 2014 brings you many happy days and many drunken moments!
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