Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Mead Forum > Raw Honey

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-22-2011, 06:42 AM   #1
CM4OSU
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Stillwater, OK
Posts: 23
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default Raw Honey

Anyone ever used raw, unfiltered honey in a mead? It seems like this is as close as one could get to an ancient-type brew. I would pour it through a tea strainer I suppose when I went to bottle, but I'm curious how the wax bits, pollens, and other bits might interact. I found a site that sells a raw, never heated honey in several varieties, and I might give it a try in the next month or so. So, experiences?

__________________

Last edited by CM4OSU; 12-22-2011 at 06:54 AM.
CM4OSU is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-22-2011, 08:27 AM   #2
Q2XL
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Eastpointe, Michigan
Posts: 514
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Yes-That is usually the choice to make meads. The more natural the honey the better.

__________________
Q2XL is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-22-2011, 12:37 PM   #3
ExoticMeadMaker
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Plano, TX
Posts: 131
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

the wax, pollen, and other bits will sink or float, just rack around it

__________________

does anyone else find themselves sitting, starring at their mead in process?

ExoticMeadMaker is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-22-2011, 02:18 PM   #4
Onihige
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Sweden
Posts: 257
Liked 30 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

Accually, in an old Swedish recipe they'd use the whole wax cake thingie. I'll see if I can find it and translate it. I think it was from the 1500's.

Nope, I can't find it anywhere anymore. But if I remember correctly, they'd boil (or just heat, not sure. Probably boil, though.) the wax cake with water, and then crack an egg in it to see how it floated, and use that as an estimation on how strong it was and how long it should be aged. No mention of yeast, of course.

__________________
Onihige is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-22-2011, 02:54 PM   #5
Jayblefty
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Roy, Utah
Posts: 61
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I have made sorbet before and to get the a nice creamy texture you have to have just enough sugar in your syrup. You float a whole egg in the shell to see how much of it pokes out of the top of the syrup. It is just like a hydrometer reading but a bit more primitive. Maybe that's what you mean instead of crack an egg into it? I don't see egg yolk fermenting well in a mead!

__________________
Jayblefty is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-22-2011, 03:13 PM   #6
Onihige
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Sweden
Posts: 257
Liked 30 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

Maybe, it was years since I read the recipe.

__________________
Onihige is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-22-2011, 09:24 PM   #7
Bugeaud
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Vancouver, BC (Canada)
Posts: 219
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Well, honey actually acts as a natural preservative, so it shouldn't hurt as far as fermentation is concerned, but idk about flavour.... and actually the ancients boiled everything. In a 16th century mead recipe I read (I forget where, easy to find though) they boiled the water, honey, and spices all together, because, simply, the water most people had access to back then was not sanitary, and needed to be boiled, or else there was a serious and almost certain risk of contamination.

__________________
Bugeaud is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-23-2011, 04:49 AM   #8
tweake
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NewZealand
Posts: 263
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

the big problem i find is the wax floats. this can means the wax can get stuff growing on it if left for long time exposed to air. it MAY limit o2 intake as it tends to make a layer between air and must.
i sieve it out as much as i can, which can be difficult if its large chunks of comb. really need to munch the comb up into fine bits first.
very fine bits of wax are very hard to get out with racking. ideally need a filter.

pollen is a non-issue as its with the honey anyway so no different to honey in the jar.

__________________
tweake is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-23-2011, 06:43 AM   #9
CM4OSU
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Stillwater, OK
Posts: 23
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

This all sounds good. The site I found offers raw honey in the comb, and filtered without wax. They said that the honey will usually crystalize when purely raw. My goal here was to make a mead with honey from my home state (New Mexico) and try my luck at making some local flavor mead. Perhaps with some green chile...

__________________
CM4OSU is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help w/ braggot: Vienna + Honey + Honey Malt ghpeel Mead Forum 1 10-18-2011 03:32 PM
Good Honey v. Cheap Honey IPYay Mead Forum 27 04-03-2011 05:26 PM
Is it a bad idea to mix cheap honey with expensive honey paddy711 Mead Forum 11 01-20-2011 07:22 PM
Cheap grade honey vs high quality honey MeadWitch Mead Forum 16 10-16-2010 02:43 AM
Blackseed Honey and Pine Honey at the Int'l Market? jkpq45 Mead Forum 0 10-08-2009 05:48 PM