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Old 12-16-2012, 03:30 AM   #1
kevinstan
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Default JAOM Without Bitter Orange

I am about to make two one gallon batches of JAOM but have a few questions. I read everywhere that its bitter at first from the white orange pith. What can I do to prevent that ? I was thinking of zesting the entire orange then removing the pith, then adding the fruit of the orange. Anyone else have a good work around ?

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Old 12-16-2012, 06:32 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by kevinstan View Post
I am about to make two one gallon batches of JAOM but have a few questions. I read everywhere that its bitter at first from the white orange pith. What can I do to prevent that ? I was thinking of zesting the entire orange then removing the pith, then adding the fruit of the orange. Anyone else have a good work around ?
No, if you read the thread(s)/posts correctly you will note that just sticking to the recipe as written doesn't give you bitterness.

The whole point of the method is to give a new mead maker an easy method and ingredients list so they can get all the stuff and just follow the method. Ending up with a batch that is sweet, tastes good, is easy/straight forward to make and gives an easily repeatable result.

The ones that come out bitter from the pith, will have been modified in some way, often in a way that will ferment the batch dry, which will focus the flavour on the bitterness inherent in the pith.

Now if you wanted to make a non-JAO orange mead you could still make a batch using those same proportions, but zesting the orange and then segmenting the flesh from the inner skin would remove any possible bitterness but most likely leaving something that is overly sweet with a higher level of orange taste i.e. syrupy orange.

In the original recipe the bitterness is balanced by the residual sugars allowing the orange and spices to give the correct levels of flavouring. Take one part away and it becomes unbalanced.

Your mead, your choice......

Just don't be surprised if it has problems or issues somewhere in the making or resultant mead......
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Old 12-16-2012, 11:04 AM   #3
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+1. A disheartening number of people modify the recipe to use wine yeast. Then, when it ferments dry they criticise the original recipe even though they didn't follow it!

But yes, some people choose to zest and peel the oranges. I think by this point you might as well not call it a JAOM though.

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Old 12-16-2012, 11:34 AM   #4
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I am new to any form of brewing and made JAOM exactly according to the recipe and whats come out is something wonderful that is not in any way bitter at all.

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Old 12-16-2012, 02:55 PM   #5
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And did you use the bread yeast or wine yeast ? I am trying to figure out what I am going to use also.

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Old 12-16-2012, 02:57 PM   #6
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Also, has anyone made it using the cuties clementines ? I thought about using 3 of them for one of the batches.

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Old 12-16-2012, 03:29 PM   #7
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Also, has anyone made it using the cuties clementines ? I thought about using 3 of them for one of the batches.
Also cusious on this. I love clementines.
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Old 12-16-2012, 05:43 PM   #8
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You should be fine using the clementines instead of orange. Just try to use an equivalent amount per gallon as you would with orange.

I've also done other citrus fruits. The lemon batch came out pretty good too, but I wouldn't recommend limes though they're just to powerful a flavour - without something to balance it.

You can indeed use a wine yeast but when its finished its bloody horrible. All the sugars have been fermented and that focuses the taste on the bitterness from the pith. You need to back sweeten it to about dessert mead levels (1.030 - 1.040 area) to make it like a bread yeast batch. That said, the higher alcohol levels also mean you are likely to have to age it for much longer.

Hence its just easier to make a batch as close to the original recipe as you can. Easier to get ingredients and quicker to finish and be drinkable.

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Old 12-17-2012, 07:37 AM   #9
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And did you use the bread yeast or wine yeast ? I am trying to figure out what I am going to use also.
Bread yeast.
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:16 PM   #10
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Does it have to be the rapid rise bread yeast ? Or the one that is not rapid rise ? Or does it matter which one ?

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