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-   -   I crash cooled my JOAM, now it is cloudy again. Bottle? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f30/i-crash-cooled-my-joam-now-cloudy-again-bottle-95958/)

Ryan 01-04-2009 06:41 PM

I crash cooled my JOAM, now it is cloudy again. Bottle?
 
So it had been a little over 2 months since I made the JOAM recipe. It was clear and I was able to read a letter through the bottle. So by all accounts it was done. Then I get the brilliant idea that crash cooling helps clear beer, maybe i could get any remaining yeast to fall out of suspension. So i move the JOAM to the sun room and let it sit overnight. So i go out there this morning to bottle it, and the JOAM was no longer clear, but it was cloudy. My question is am I ok to bottle it, or should I wait? Could the mead just have a chill haze going on?

FWIW, until yesterday, the oranges were still in suspension. They dropped while being in the cold.

tooomanycolors 01-04-2009 06:50 PM

I would wait, whats the harm in a little more time. Especially since this recipe is quick anyway normally you think in years not months with mead.

ruger12pk 01-04-2009 07:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ryan (Post 1041905)
So it had been a little over 2 months since I made the JOAM recipe. It was clear and I was able to read a letter through the bottle. So by all accounts it was done. Then I get the brilliant idea that crash cooling helps clear beer, maybe i could get any remaining yeast to fall out of suspension. So i move the JOAM to the sun room and let it sit overnight. So i go out there this morning to bottle it, and the JOAM was no longer clear, but it was cloudy. My question is am I ok to bottle it, or should I wait? Could the mead just have a chill haze going on?

FWIW, until yesterday, the oranges were still in suspension. They dropped while being in the cold.

I think what your seeing is pectin haze which comes from the oranges. The pectin gels when cooled. If it gets warm again it will clear but it will come back in the bottles. Now Right off hand I know there is something you can do to prevent this Pectin Haze. It might be the use of some sparkeloid compound but dont quote me on that. I know some of the old hands on here know what to do with it. One thing is for sure, its harmless.

:mug:

ruger12pk 01-04-2009 07:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ryan (Post 1041905)
So it had been a little over 2 months since I made the JOAM recipe. It was clear and I was able to read a letter through the bottle. So by all accounts it was done. Then I get the brilliant idea that crash cooling helps clear beer, maybe i could get any remaining yeast to fall out of suspension. So i move the JOAM to the sun room and let it sit overnight. So i go out there this morning to bottle it, and the JOAM was no longer clear, but it was cloudy. My question is am I ok to bottle it, or should I wait? Could the mead just have a chill haze going on?

FWIW, until yesterday, the oranges were still in suspension. They dropped while being in the cold.


I just looked this up to see what the deal is. I hope it helps you!

Pectin Haze: The most common cause of a haze in wine is the presence of pectin, which forms gelatinous solutions in the wine. The problem is aggravated if the must is initially boiled to extract flavor, color or both. To check if a haze is pectin in origin, add 3-4 fluid ounces of methylated spirit to a fluid ounce of wine. If jelly-like clots or strings form, then the problem is most likely pectin and should be treated.
To treat the wine, for each gallon of wine draw off one cup of wine and stir into it teaspoon of pectic enzyme. Set the treated sample in a warm place (70-80 F.) and stir hourly for four hours. Strain the sample through sterilized muslin cloth and add to the bulk of the wine. Leave the wine at 70 F. for 4-5 days. The haze should clear. If it does not, strain the wine through sterilized muslin cloth and then through a vacuum-pumped filter. If it still does not clarify, the problem was misdiagnosed.
Pectin hazes can be prevented by adding pectic enzymes to the must 12 hours before adding the wine yeast. One teaspoon of enzyme per gallon of must is usually enough, but some musts require 1-1/2 teaspoons.


:mug:

ruger12pk 01-04-2009 07:13 PM

This brings up an interesting question, Im going to start a batch of Orange cinnamon Mead here in the next few days...Should I get and add some pectic enzyme to the must prior to pitching? Id like a final still and clear Mead

Yooper 01-04-2009 07:17 PM

I use pectic enzyme in all musts that have fruit in them. A tsp per gallon works great. The best way to use it is to use it approximately 12 hours before you pitch the yeast, and about 12 hours after any sulfites (if using). So, what I do is mix up the must, and add the sulfites (if I'm using them). 12 hours later, I add the pectic enzyme and stir well. Then, 12 hours later, I add the yeast.

ruger12pk 01-05-2009 12:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by YooperBrew (Post 1041953)
I use pectic enzyme in all musts that have fruit in them. A tsp per gallon works great. The best way to use it is to use it approximately 12 hours before you pitch the yeast, and about 12 hours after any sulfites (if using). So, what I do is mix up the must, and add the sulfites (if I'm using them). 12 hours later, I add the pectic enzyme and stir well. Then, 12 hours later, I add the yeast.


Good Advice Yooper! Thanks, Im going to head out today and get some along with a new batch of cleanser. Time to get this 5 gal started!

:ban:


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