Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Mead Forum > How should I stabilize my mead and/or get the gravity a tad bit lower?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-07-2012, 05:09 PM   #11
homebrewbeliever
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
homebrewbeliever's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 306
Liked 12 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBrewingMedic
a 2-4% change in abv is potentially a .015-.035 change in gravity ..... last time I thought something just couldn't happen, like there was no possible damn way it could occur, well false sense of security went out the window when it did happen....not saying it will, not even suggesting it is likely, just saying it's possible.

(That occurence was an early batch of mead using the fickle wyeast, yeah I was uneducated and didnt know better, sweet mead smack pack...finished sweet alright, so I freaked, googled for help, took first suggestion, rehydrated a pack of 1118, pitched it, ducked the geyser, capped with a blowoff tube and let her rip...the bottles that are left have a nice pucker factor to their dryness. Very drinkable as I like dry wine, I'm also contemplating trying it in a chicken marsala and a couple pasta recipes)
BrewMedic, thank you a lot for your suggestions. I very well may pull out a gallon of the mead like it is now and let it stabilize on its own and bottle it using some of the techniques you've suggested. However, I do not want 5 gallons of dessert mead. I think I may go with the 1118 and just let 'er rip and see what happens. I do not dislike dry wine, although I do prefer a slightly sweet one. Still, I plan on making a yeast starter because the last time I simply rehydrated the 1118 and pitched it with some nutrients, it did not survive.

Any ideas on how to make a good starter for this mead? I got 12 oz of clover honey (its pretty mild in its flavor so it shouldn't taint the flavors I have in the mead), and I was thinking of using some of it with some nutrients and letting the yeast start up in it for 3 or so days. I have never had to make a starter before, either with beer or wine, so this is new to me. Should I add a bit of my mead to the starter once its been going for a day or two, that way it might help acclimate it to its future home? And how much of a starter should I make? Like 8 oz? 16 oz? A quart?
__________________

For eclectic escapades in home-brewed deliciousness:
http://homebrewbeliever.blogspot.com

homebrewbeliever is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-07-2012, 08:42 PM   #12
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 61,056
Liked 4462 Times on 3248 Posts
Likes Given: 868

Default

Start small- rehydrate the yeast in water than add a very dilute honey/water mixture (say, 1.020-1.030). Once it gets going well, add more, a little less diluted, and do that a couple of times. Once it's ripping along pretty well, add some of your mead diluted in water (to reduce the ABV the yeast is exposed to). Dilute less and less, adding more mead. When you can add 100% pure mead with no slow down of activity, and it's ripping good, then go ahead and add it to your mead.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-12-2012, 01:03 AM   #13
homebrewbeliever
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
homebrewbeliever's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 306
Liked 12 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper
Start small- rehydrate the yeast in water than add a very dilute honey/water mixture (say, 1.020-1.030). Once it gets going well, add more, a little less diluted, and do that a couple of times. Once it's ripping along pretty well, add some of your mead diluted in water (to reduce the ABV the yeast is exposed to). Dilute less and less, adding more mead. When you can add 100% pure mead with no slow down of activity, and it's ripping good, then go ahead and add it to your mead.
Thanks, yooper. I'm going to make the starter tomorrow, and I'll be sure to follow your suggestions.
__________________

For eclectic escapades in home-brewed deliciousness:
http://homebrewbeliever.blogspot.com

homebrewbeliever is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools