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Old 07-21-2009, 01:35 AM   #11
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Yeah, I said what I was buying above.

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Old 07-21-2009, 01:54 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by childrenofsodom View Post
Yeah, I said what I was buying above.
Detailed Description
Go-FERM is a completely original yeast nutrient researched and developed by Lallemand (patent pending). It is 100% biological specific inactive yeast produced through a unique yeast biomass process that is fine-tuned to obtain high levels of certain essential vitamins, minerals and amino acids that yeast requires for a healthy fermentation.

The GO-FERM approach is to provide bioavailable micronutrients in the rehydration water instead of the traditional method of adding micronutrients to the must. By adding the micronutrients directly to the targeted yeast in a balanced concentration, they are more easily used by the yeast. This direct contact protects against the chelation of key minerals by inorganic anions, organic acids, polyphenols and polysaccharides present in the must. It also prevents essential vitamins from being rapidly taken up by wild microflora or inactivated by SO2 before the inoculated yeast can take advantage of these essential elements.

The use of Go-Ferm results in significantly better overall health of yeast cells throughout the fermentation, affecting fermentation kinetics and resulting in a cleaner aromatic profile. This is especially evident when Go-Ferm is used in high maturity grape musts to avoid sluggish fermentation finishes.

Use Go-Ferm at a rate of 1.25 grams for every 1 gram of yeast being used. Then mix the Go-Ferm with 17mls of H2O for every gallon of wine must.
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Old 07-21-2009, 05:40 PM   #13
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Right, so the mix ratio of Go-Ferm to water to yeast is, PER GALLON OF MUST, 1 g active dry yeast, 1.25 g Go-Ferm, and 17 ml of water. So for a 5 gallon batch multiply each of those quantities by 5.

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Old 08-02-2009, 07:07 AM   #14
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Alright guys, here it is.



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Old 08-02-2009, 07:17 AM   #15
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Recipe -

3 lbs clover honey
1 gallon spring water
1 gram wine yest
1.25 gram go-ferm
.75 lbs strawberry

I put it all in a 1 gallon glass jug, with a stopper and 3 piece airlock. I read on another thread that i should add pectic enzyme to make sure the mead clears. Anyone second this? How much? I also need to know if/when to take out the strawberries.

Thanks.

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Old 08-03-2009, 07:17 PM   #16
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Yes, add pectic enzyme to ensure that the pectins in the strawberries don't cloud your batch. Ideally you should add it before pitching the yeast (it works better when not in the presence of alcohol - ethanol slows it down signficantly). Just use the amount as directed on the packaging - there are different pectinase enzymes commercially available and you'll want to follow the directions directly from the supplier.

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Old 08-03-2009, 09:38 PM   #17
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Before I record my dissent, as my strawberry mead cleared nicely on it's own, how long do you plan on keeping it in the fermentor?

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Old 08-03-2009, 10:06 PM   #18
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I met with a guy that's made mead for many years and he tells me that he doesn't even think about adding flavors until after his mead has sat for a whole year. He said that many of complex flavors and aromas wear off over time, especially when there is still fermentation going on. It's food for thought at least. You can still make a great flavored mead eventually if you just start with a good basic mead.

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Old 08-03-2009, 11:02 PM   #19
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Vuarra, you really mean "after recording your dissent," don't you?

Seriously, although there are lots of cases where folks have had melomels clear with no issues when using fresh fruit, there's always the odd time where the fruit have been kept at too high a temperature, or whatever, and the pectins have "set," essentially forming long polysaccharide chains that stubbornly resist settling out. That's what brings a pectin haze to the product. Working with commercially frozen fruit, or otherwise preserved fruit, increases the chances of getting some set pectins along with the good stuff. Pectinase is merely an insurance policy to avoid that chance.

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Old 08-04-2009, 12:23 AM   #20
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So, after 5 days I took the strawberries out, the anti-pectin stuff is in the mail, and I added raisins to keep the yeast going after any shock that may have been dealt to it in the removal process.

I'm a noob at this, like I said, so I'm not sure exactly what to do. I'm thinking about letting it continue to ferment with just the raisins. I'm leaving town for a while in mid September, so I was thinking about letting it sit until then, then put in a lbs of frozen strawberries and then do nothing until December.

Any ideas?

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