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Old 09-21-2012, 02:51 PM   #1
codfishh
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Default Fermaid K vs. Yeastex 82

Does anyone know if there's a difference between these two?
Yeastex 82 doesn't list the ingredients.

Also I was wondering if there's a substitute for GO Ferm since I can't seem to find it here in Ottawa. Should I just go ahead without it?

Thanks

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Old 09-24-2012, 05:25 AM   #2
fatbloke
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codfishh View Post
Does anyone know if there's a difference between these two?
Yeastex 82 doesn't list the ingredients.

Also I was wondering if there's a substitute for GO Ferm since I can't seem to find it here in Ottawa. Should I just go ahead without it?

Thanks
I've not heard of yeastex.

Most nutrient makers only provide the most basic ingredient list, at least Lallemand provide both an ingredient list and the amount of nitrogen it provides for FermaidK.

As far as I'm aware, there isn't a substitute (well an "off the shelf" substitute anyway) for GoFerm. It's basically a combined nutrient with no DAP (I haven't checked the ingredients recently - too confirm that), because DAP is considered injurious to the yeast in the very early stages of development. Now that might be just complete marketing bollocks, just for them to sell more of it etc, but there does seem to be at least some research involved with it.

It's designed (apparently) to help you make the most of the abilities of your yeast, but if you can't track any down locally and don't want to mail order any, then if you just rehydrated your yeast as the pack says, then pitch it, allow it a day or so to start doing it's thing, then add half to 2/3rds of the nutrient requirement for the batch, also check the batch with a hydrometer reading, then stir it daily until it hits the 1/3rd sugar break and add the rest of the nutrient for the batch (after it's been stirred/aerated), before airlocking it off to finish......
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Old 09-30-2012, 07:31 PM   #3
Cellarbrau
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Yeastex 82 is a Fermentation nutrient and GoFerm is a reydration nutrient. They should not be used interchangeably.

Fermentation nutrients contain high levels of Nitrogen, usually from DAP (Diammonium Phosphate), which stimulates yeast growth.

GoFerm contains the vitamins and minerals that are used by yeast. Reydration in water creates an osmotic gradient that leaches these nutrients, from the high density in the cell to the low density in the water, while the cell wall is very permeable. Adding GoFerm to the water maintains or even increases the yeasts nutrient reserves during rehydration.

Nitrogen levels should not be too high or too low. Usually fermentation nutrients are added in stages (ie. 1/3, 2/3 sugar depletion) to prevent too high levels of nitrogen.

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Old 09-30-2012, 08:03 PM   #4
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Depends on who's guidance you read, I generally split my total into two, with first dose after lag, rest at 1/3rd break.

Yet I've read some research that suggests front loading the must (post lag) up to 85% of the total requirement with the rest at 1/3 to 1/2 break. After that, inorganic nitrogen isn't absorbed efficiently, so any late addition nitrogen source should be organic i.e. yeast hulls, boiled bread yeast or fermaidO.........

Top post though Cellarbrau. Better put than I could manage......

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