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Old 06-16-2011, 11:21 PM   #11
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By the way, while I'm at it, might as well pose this question: girlfriend is not gonna give up this fruit mead quest. What should I be using for those? Is the quality of the honey less important then? So much so I could use supermarket honey?
I've found that I can buy local honey directly from local beekeepers nearly as cheap as imported honey in the supermarket.
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Old 06-17-2011, 03:43 PM   #12
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I've found that I can buy local honey directly from local beekeepers nearly as cheap as imported honey in the supermarket.
True. I was shocked by how close the prices were compared to the quality of each. I guess my question was more like, if the consensus is to save wildflower for the traditional, what should I be using in a melomel? I'm sure there are a bunch of options but what should I be looking for generally? Or, more precisely, should I not use wildflower honey here because it would come out subpar or just because it's a precious thing to waste? I wouldn't mind going out and getting some more of this to do a melomel, as long as the flavors aren't going to clash and I just don't know enough about it to tell.
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:05 AM   #13
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Or, more precisely, should I not use wildflower honey here because it would come out subpar or just because it's a precious thing to waste? I wouldn't mind going out and getting some more of this to do a melomel, as long as the flavors aren't going to clash and I just don't know enough about it to tell.
I guess it depends on where you live. Here in Colorado most of the honey is wildflower or clover. I can get a gallon of wild flower and clover both for around $40 so I like to use mostly wild flower. I've done probably 6 melomels using wildflower honey and they all turned out great. Wildflower seems to compliment berries the best (strwberries, blackberries, raspberries, etc.) I also used sage blossom about a year ago for a strawberry and it turned out fantastic. Try millershoney.com. The gallon of sage blossom I got cost me $5 less AFTER sipping then store bought.

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Old 06-21-2011, 05:08 AM   #14
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I guess it depends on where you live. ... Try millershoney.com. The gallon of sage blossom I got cost me $5 less AFTER sipping then store bought.
Good advice to shop around you never know what you will find. For a mel with loads of fruit just use whatever is cheap as long as it tastes good and "clean". Our wildflower honey here in Texas is loaded with too much floral character so it really only tastes good in a straight traditional. In other parts of the country the wildflower honey is a bit tamer and is probably an excellent choice that may be found at the local farmer's market rather cheaply.
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:50 PM   #15
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Thanks guys. I'll take all that into consideration.

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Old 06-21-2011, 10:48 PM   #16
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I guess it depends on where you live. Here in Colorado most of the honey is wildflower or clover. I can get a gallon of wild flower and clover both for around $40 so I like to use mostly wild flower.
I get my honey from Madhava in Lyons, just west of Longmont, CO. They have a great Alfapha Honey. They also have Clover and Wildflower. I usually get mine in 42 pound buckets for about $2.00 a pound. A Gallon is about 12 pounds. so that's $22 a Gal. But then again, I can get it Wholesale. Always excelent product. I find that Alfapha is a robust honey flavor that makes a good base.

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Old 06-23-2011, 06:59 PM   #17
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I'd love to know how your able to get wholesale prices! If you have to drive to Lyon it might just be better to pay retail. lol. I've used Madhava's before and it does taste pretty good. My favorite locally has to be their Ambrosia line though. I've made quite a few great melomels with the Alpine wildflower honey.

Will
Lakewood, CO

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Old 06-24-2011, 03:02 PM   #18
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I'd love to know how your able to get wholesale prices! If you have to drive to Lyon it might just be better to pay retail. lol. I've used Madhava's before and it does taste pretty good. My favorite locally has to be their Ambrosia line though. I've made quite a few great melomels with the Alpine wildflower honey.

Will
Lakewood, CO
Well, It's not much of a Drive from Thornton. As to how I get Wholesale without a Wholesale licence: I explained to them what I do with it and provided them with a bottle or two as proof, once. The person to talk to over there is Mary, I guess she handles the wholesale accounts. Also, the lady that works the little hut infrount of the warehouse is very friendly. Just explain that you have no intention of reselling it but need their wholesale price and are willing to buy in bulk, that is the 42 pound buckets. I usually buy 3 of them at a time. Beware though, the honey may crystalize if you take longer than a 8 months to a year to use it. I have been considering dropping down to 2 for this reason. I have 7 carboys but don't get much time to brew.
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