The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Mead Forum > Clearing times

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-04-2013, 04:35 PM   #1
Bluespark
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 417
Liked 26 Times on 20 Posts

Default Clearing times

What is the longest it has taken a mead to clear? The shortest?

I have a few different batches started at the end of november 2012. I started by making a traditional mead, then adding flavours in secondary, once divided into separate carboys. Some are almost clear, others are not even starting. I step fed ec1118 to its max tolerance, so this is 18% +. All fruit ones had pectin enzyme added at the beginning of secondary. Here are the types/ clarity:

Hibiscus- very hazy.
Strawberry- 80% clear, just a bit foggy
Vanilla- 80% clear, just a bit foggy
Orange cinnamon- 80% clear, just a bit foggy
Pomegranate- very hazy
Chocolate- extremely cloudy.

Is this normal? These are now 3+ months old, and I was hoping to bottle at 4 ish months, but I will leave it as long as nessesary.

__________________
Bluespark is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-04-2013, 07:13 PM   #2
JustinCider
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
JustinCider's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Tecumseh, Michigan
Posts: 104
Liked 20 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 48

Default

I'm about to use some bentonite to clear up a few wines and meads i have in the same position as yours are. Although i haven't gotten very good instructions to use it yet. As far as i know...you should stabilize and then pitch your pre mixed bentonite and it should be crystal clear in around a week as the clay will bind to all the BS. I wish someone like Fatbloke would respond and tell us his process for using bentonite...I'm guessing he wouldnt use it though. hahahahaa. Just rack for a few more months.

__________________
JustinCider is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-04-2013, 08:14 PM   #3
Inner10
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 512
Liked 43 Times on 36 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I use bentonite in my must, if I want my final product to be absolutely crystal clear and I don't want to wait a year I use Sparkolloid. 48 hours later it's clear.

__________________

Drank too much?...Is that a thing?

Inner10 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-04-2013, 10:35 PM   #4
saramc
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: suburb of Louisville, KY
Posts: 1,743
Liked 146 Times on 132 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Pulled this from Jack Keller's site, Finishing Your Wine page @ http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/finishin.asp

Bentonite is added according to the need for it. That is not a very precise answer, but let me explain. A dose rate of 1-6 grams per gallon is usually desired. The lesser amount is for wines that are almost clear, but a slight, unsightly haze persists. The greater amount is for wines that have real clarity problems. You have to judge the degree of severity yourself, but do not want to use more than necessary as it will impart an "earthiness" to the wine if over-done. The best thing to do is give the wine plenty of time to clarify on its own. I never add bentonite to a wine that hasn't been given six months and three rackings to clear.

Bentonite must be hydrated before being used. Measure out the desired quantity (say, 2 grams). Pour 3/4 cup of boiling water into a small bowl (for 4 grams of bentonite, use 1-1/2 cups of boiling water) and add the bentonite. If you do not have a gram scale, one measured teaspoon of bentonite weighs 5.4 grams. Use a small whisk and mix the bentonite-water into a slurry. Mix for at least two minutes, working out any lumps that form. You want a creamy consistency. Cover and set aside for 24 hours. Do NOT skip this step! The bentonite will settle, so grab the whisk and whip it into a slurry again.

The wine should be recently racked before adding bentonite, as you do not want a lees deposit present when you add the slurry. Sterilize a wooden dowel or glass rod. Remove the airlock from the wine. While slowly adding the bentonite, use the dowel or rod to stir the wine. The bentonite has to be thoroughly mixed with the wine to work, so stir well. Clean the mouth of the secondary to remove any bentonite that may have gotten on it and refit the airlock. Keep the wine at room temperature (moving it into a cold garage will cause some of the bentonite to go back into suspension). The bentonite will attract positively-charged particles as it settles out. When the wine is clear, give it another few days and carefully rack it off the bentonite deposits. A treatment should take no more than two weeks. Bottle at once.

__________________

Motto: quel che sara sara

saramc is offline
JustinCider Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-05-2013, 02:56 PM   #5
MarshmallowBlue
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 984
Liked 83 Times on 73 Posts
Likes Given: 50

Default

Ive had some clear in a couple months and one at 5 months that didn't clear because of pectin. But was crystal clear after pectic enzyme addition.

__________________

Lifetime goal: 7,777 gallons --- gallons made 44
My Home Brew Blog
My Home-brewing Pinterest < It's a beautiful thing.

MarshmallowBlue is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-06-2013, 01:12 AM   #6
biochemedic
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
biochemedic's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Belmont, NC
Posts: 1,786
Liked 72 Times on 64 Posts
Likes Given: 20

Default

Cysers tend to clear the fastest in my experience (usually crystal clear on their own in 3-4 months), but I've learned this year that it seems to depend on the apple blend...this year my cider source was all green apples (Granny Smith, Gold Rush & Golden Delicious) and it seems to be taking a little longer to clear. The longest to clear is things like cocoa meads...I'm not sure exactly how long it would take naturally, but I know its longer than 2 years! (I eventually got impatient and finally hit it with SuperKleer KC...(twice!)...to get it to clear. I'm expecting to have to do the same with my cocoa bochet I currently have bulk aging....)

__________________
Packaged: Dark Munich Citra SMaSH, Mayan Stout, Caramel Quad, Basic Spiced Cider, Spur of the Moment Graff
Recent Meads: Mead Day '11 Ginger Metheglin, Mead Day '12 Traditional (orange blossom) Mead, Fresh Simple Cyser '12, Cherry Melomel, Belgeglin, Bochet
Primary: Nada!
Secondary: Why do I keep this line here...?
Bulk Aging: Cocobochet
Planned: Hop Metheglin #3 (NZ hops), Trad. Gesho T'ej
biochemedic is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2013, 05:35 PM   #7
Bluespark
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 417
Liked 26 Times on 20 Posts

Default

Any one else notice that high abv meads tend to clear slower? My 18% (or a little higher) is taking a lot longer to clear than my lower abv(14%) stuff.

__________________
Bluespark is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-24-2013, 01:57 AM   #8
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,044
Liked 4202 Times on 3059 Posts
Likes Given: 779

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluespark View Post
Any one else notice that high abv meads tend to clear slower? My 18% (or a little higher) is taking a lot longer to clear than my lower abv(14%) stuff.
No. BUT- I have noticed that certain yeast strains take longer. Maybe you used champagne yeast for the 18%, and montrachet yeast for the 14%, and that's the difference.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-26-2013, 02:47 PM   #9
Bluespark
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 417
Liked 26 Times on 20 Posts

Default

I've used ec1118 for the 18% batch, and lalvin 1122 and d47 for the 14% ones.

The fastest clearing by far is the JAOM's made with bread yeast. Why would bread yeast (and citrus without pectin enzyme) be crystal clear in under 3 months while the ec1118 batches are 4+ months old and still very hazy?

__________________
Bluespark is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Clearing times and Brett... BootsyFlanootsy Lambic & Wild Brewing 2 03-23-2012 09:57 PM
Clearing after clearing (a skeeterpee question) Tw0fish Wine Making Forum 2 03-13-2012 01:16 PM
IPA Not Clearing permo All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 16 07-19-2011 04:00 PM
Clearing KayaBrew Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 04-30-2009 01:10 PM
Not Clearing PeteOz77 Wine Making Forum 3 05-05-2008 11:40 AM