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Old 11-27-2011, 02:45 PM   #1
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Default Can I condition cyser in bottle?

Ok, so in a month, my cyser goes from pail to carboy. I know I have to top it off with juice.

Can I just prime it, when it is well carbed, bottle pasterise, and just let it sit for year, in bottles?



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Old 11-27-2011, 04:08 PM   #2
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Ok, so in a month, my cyser goes from pail to carboy. I know I have to top it off with juice.

Can I just prime it, when it is well carbed, bottle pasterise, and just let it sit for year, in bottles?
For bottle conditioning, it's normal to make a batch that is dry etc, then get it cleared, etc. Then you need either beer bottles or champagne/sparkling wine bottles.

It's usually enough to put a small amount of priming sugar in, then cork and wire sparkling/champagne bottles and leave them somewhere warm for a while before putting them away in storage. Or of course the same but with beer bottles/crown caps.

Your only issue is likely a small amount of sediment in the bottom of the bottle(s) unless you have access to riddling equipment to slowly rotate the bottles upside down and then a chiller and liquid nitrogen to flash freeze the top of the bottle and liquid and remove the small yeast plug. The local vineyards here usually just add a little new yeast and use crown caps for the first part of the process, then once the yeast has done it's thing, they'll flash freeze and remove the yeast plug and change the stopper to cork and wire, before foiling and labelling.

It's up to you how you achieve this, but you need to look it all up so you don't end up with bottle bombs.......


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Old 11-27-2011, 04:21 PM   #3
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I understand the concepts, I make a wicked sweet carbed cider.

My point is, can it condition bottled, instead of in the carboy

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Old 11-27-2011, 08:54 PM   #4
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Yes. That's probably the best way. Either that or forced carbonation.

Beers tend to have a much lower pressure level than sparkling wines and champagne. Plus there's some info floating about that relates to the pressures that can be generated, depending on how much priming sugar is used etc. Hence its your choice of which kind of bottles to use etc.

The principal is the same, so it just means working out the levels of carbonation you'll be looking at. Plus don't forget that you'd be needing to manage the recipe accordingly, as the yeast will have to have some tolerance left to convert the priming sugars.

I suspect its feasible to make a batch to the 16% area and use enough priming sugar to not only carbonate it, but also to supply a little back sweetening.....

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Old 11-27-2011, 09:37 PM   #5
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one more question.

I used 15 lbs of clove honey, with 5 gallons of juice. I added some acid blend.

My SG is more than 1.090. I suspect the temp had something to do with it.

If it is that high, the EC1118 will stop fermenting well before 1.000.

If that happens, then priming won't work, can I just add a 1/4 tsp of fresh yeast to carb it, and let it eat the sugar that is left?

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Old 11-28-2011, 02:51 AM   #6
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I understand the concepts, I make a wicked sweet carbed cider.

My point is, can it condition bottled, instead of in the carboy
the problems with bottle conditioning is it can vary from bottle to bottle.
then theres the problem of sediment if its not fully clear before bottling.
i had a cyser that took 3 months before sediment dropped out and it looks really icky in the bottles.

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one more question.
My SG is more than 1.090. I suspect the temp had something to do with it.

If it is that high, the EC1118 will stop fermenting well before 1.000.
no, ec1118 will chew through all that with ease. 1.090 is fairly low. none of my meads are under SG 1.100 and they finish bone dry with yeasts such as ec1118.

you would want to use something like 71b for you main ferment and then carb it useing ec1118.
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Old 11-28-2011, 03:50 AM   #7
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I am fermenting with EC1118. The gravity was very high. My hydrometer was floating completely.

Do you think it will have enough yeast to carb?

I will add more juice or concentrate to prime, maybe a little more honey, and watch it like a hawk, bottle pasterize when ready.

My success rate with the Papper's method is fantastic. 20 gallons, only three broken bottles.

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Old 11-28-2011, 05:33 AM   #8
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sorry just re read it.
15lbs honey
5 gallons apple
SG 1.175 depending on sugar level of the apples.
calc shows it should finish around 1.040 at 18% alcohol so its going to be super sweet.

i would look at water it down.

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Old 11-28-2011, 01:46 PM   #9
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Oh good. I can water it down to make more, but how do I carb it? Will I add more yeast?

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Old 11-29-2011, 03:07 AM   #10
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i'm not up on the carbing side. nicest way is to use bottled co2.
natural way is to let the mead ferment dry, about 12-14% alcohol. let it clear, age etc. then put a small about of yeast and sugar back into each bottle. that will ferment in the bottle (use champagne bottles!).
most people don't have the freezing gear so just put up with the yeast in the bottle.



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