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Old 02-10-2011, 03:28 PM   #21
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If I chose to bottle my mead in wine bottles with corks, the preferred storage method would be bottles on their sides (to keep the corks from drying out) out of any direct sunlight?

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Old 02-10-2011, 04:05 PM   #22
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Yes, if you use natural cork, keeping the cork moist is ideal. You do want to let them stay upright for a couple of days after bottling to allow the corks to fully expand and allow pressure to equalize before turning them on their sides.

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Old 02-10-2011, 04:51 PM   #23
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I'm in the "got a capper, don't want to spend the $$ on a corker" category.

Reading this thread, one post said that caps were only good for about a year's storage because they let in too much air, but another said that they were good for long-term storage:

Caps for short-term storage (~1 year)

Quote:
Originally Posted by summersolstice View Post
Yes, corks supply a better seal, assuming you have decent quality corks and you lay the bottles on their sides to prevent the corks from drying out. Bottles sealed with synthetic corks can remain upright but synthetics aren't as good a top quality corks, though still better than crown caps.

Crown caps are fine. If you don't want to spend the $$ for a corker, use crown caps and you'll be safe for a year, and perhaps even more. Remember that you can also crown cap most domestic sparkling wine bottels as well.
Caps for long-term storage (>1 year)
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Originally Posted by MedsenFey View Post
If you look at wine studies, particular the AWRI research, the verdict is pretty clear - the Stelvin screw cap does the best job of preserving a white wine for long term aging. Since few of us can afford a Stelvin machine at home, that's not really and option, but the next best thing may be a crown cap. On the other extreme, the closures that allowed the most oxidation of the wine were the synthetic corks.

Crown caps are used in Champagne Production; the crown cap is removed after riddling when they are ready for corking. Sometime they age for decades with the crown cap on before they remove the yeast, so crown caps have the potential to age for a very, very long time. Some folks advocate waxing the crown caps, and that is certainly an option though I don't know if it is necessary.

I currently have a comparison between good quality natural cork (Scott Labs USS grade), Zorks and crown caps using a dry mango melomel. I'm due to update it, but so far, it appears (with blind tasters and triangular tasting) that the crown caps have preserved the aroma the best, with Zorks a close second, and the natural cork had the least fruitiness. This is only one batch, and I wouldn't generalize these findings without some more tests, but I did find it interesting.

The problem with using crown caps is the perception of the people opening the bottle. I had one friend say, "why the cheap caps?" and it seems clear that unless there is a cork, people are inclined to judge your wine/mead as being cheap/inferior - a very unfortunate misperception.

Medsen
So, which one is right?

Also, would it make a difference if a crown-capped bottle were kept on its side so there was a liquid seal against the cap?
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Old 02-10-2011, 05:44 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smyrnaquince View Post
Also, would it make a difference if a crown-capped bottle were kept on its side so there was a liquid seal against the cap?
No that won't make a difference. With natural corks, the cork has to be kept moist or it will contact and reduce the seal. With crown caps and other closures, that is not necessary so you can keep them upright.

The biggest potential negative for using crown caps for long aging may be the possibility of developing reductive sulfur odors. There is some evidence of this having happened in a melomel that I've been following for a couple of years now.
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Old 02-11-2011, 02:12 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MedsenFey View Post
It is just past the 2 year point now.

The Zork manufacturer says they are good for aging up to at least 5 years. We really need some long, long term tests with meads. Given that meads may be much less oxidation prone than wines, Zorks might allow for much longer aging of meads. We need to find out.

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But who can let a good mead sit for longer than 5 years?
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Old 02-15-2011, 07:22 PM   #26
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Quote:
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But who can let a good mead sit for longer than 5 years?
Those in search of GREAT mead.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:04 PM   #27
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I usually put in a synthetic cork, add a crown cap, then cover the entire bottle with wax. Overkill?

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Old 02-19-2013, 06:04 PM   #28
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I use cork for the aesthetic look of the cork. Also because I got my corker at a special discount rate (20$).
Also I like the look of the bottle with the heat shrink. I don't think it can be done with crown cap.

For carbonated mead, I'll use american sparkling wine bottle. These bottle let you use either crown cap or cork.
Since crown cap is cheaper, I'll go with crown cap. It's important that you buy crown cap with seal. I read somewhere that the guy bought crown cap but they were decorative cap (without seal). His mead or beer never cabonated because the CO2 was leaking out.

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Old 05-23-2013, 07:12 PM   #29
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what's the verdict on PolySeal Screw Caps? are they viable for storing still mead long term?

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Old 05-23-2013, 07:22 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TLProulx View Post
I use cork for the aesthetic look of the cork. Also because I got my corker at a special discount rate (20$).
Also I like the look of the bottle with the heat shrink. I don't think it can be done with crown cap.

For carbonated mead, I'll use american sparkling wine bottle. These bottle let you use either crown cap or cork.
Since crown cap is cheaper, I'll go with crown cap. It's important that you buy crown cap with seal. I read somewhere that the guy bought crown cap but they were decorative cap (without seal). His mead or beer never cabonated because the CO2 was leaking out.
I crown and cork each batch about 50/50. Let me clear up some misconceptions with the post though.

You can use heat shrinks on beer bottles, Mission St's Anniversary Ale uses them. and they are caped underneath with Standard size crown caps.


Not sure what you mean by caps with a seal. If you mean the air barrier, that's also not necessary. I've carbed over 50 bottles with the cheap gold caps from the home-brew store. You can not however, re-use crown caps, or corks for that matter.
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