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Old 11-03-2008, 11:37 PM   #1
Liquisky
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Default Best way to dissolve raw honey

I've picked up 3 lbs of raw mesquite honey and I plan on making a gallon of dry show mead with it. The honey I picked up is "guaranteed not to have been heated at any time."

I want to make the best mead I can with this light honey.

How hot should I bring the water to dissolve this?

I've never had to dissolve raw honey. The processed stuff I brought to about 120 degrees. Is this too high for the really good stuff.

Any suggestions so that I get the best product from this batch.

I plan on using appropriate amounts of DAP, Potassium Carbonate (per the mead forum sticky) , and Yeast energizer and shake the hell out of the jug to aerate.

I have Lalvin 118, D47, and Montrachet yeasts. Which one would you more experienced guys suggest for a really great dry mead I can enjoy with family Christmas 2009?

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Old 11-04-2008, 02:47 AM   #2
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...How hot should I bring the water to dissolve this? I've never had to dissolve raw honey. The processed stuff I brought to about 120 degrees. Is this too high for the really good stuff.

I have Lalvin 118, D47, and Montrachet yeasts. Which one would you more experienced guys suggest for a really great dry mead I can enjoy with family Christmas 2009?
While I'm certain there may be other opinions, when I made mead I typically heat some portion of the water I use to 115°F to aide in dissolving the honey. Once at that temp I remove my mixing kettle (7 gal SS) from the heat and then mix in whatever honey the recipe requires. Personally, I find that temperature is not excessive and does little detriment to the honey.

Regarding the yeast, using EC-1118 will definitely result in a dry mead - unless your OG is excessively high. The ICV D47 will work as well but has a lower EtoH tolerance and does not tolerate low nutrient levels. I tend to avoid Montrachet as I have found it somewhat finicky...
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Old 11-04-2008, 02:54 AM   #3
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I tend to avoid Montrachet as I have found it somewhat finicky...
IF I have Montrichet in the house...it's for Apfelwein!

I would get the nutrient and energizer and go for the D-47!
I use water as hot as I can stand on my hands...that's not full on hot water. I dump some of the honey out, add the water in, shake like hell. Dump that out, add more warm water and shake like hell, then Dump and repeat. I usually end up with about 2/3 of a gallon when I'm done with a 3 # jug. I feel like I get a jump on aeration this way, and it mixes the honey pretty well to boot!
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Old 11-04-2008, 03:00 AM   #4
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it will not take long to disolve it with some heat, 115 to 120 will be fine ,, it needs to get much hot to do any damage. the aromatics that can be driven off with heat are ring hydrocarbons have boiling points all above 175°f

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Old 11-04-2008, 03:21 AM   #5
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Thanks for the replys all.

BigKahuna, why do you prefer the D-47 over the E-118?

Thanks

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Old 11-04-2008, 04:19 AM   #6
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Thanks for the replys all.

BigKahuna, why do you prefer the D-47 over the E-118?

Thanks
Well, I like the somewhat...White Wine flavor of the D-47. It is listed as a "Chardonnay" yeast, and I can detect that flavor. I like mead with some nice delicate fruit flavors, and have grown an affection for the D-47. The EC-1118 is basically the same as the Premiere Cuve from Red Star. I like it a lot, and is very interesting, as it doesn't bring much if any flavor to the party. It is SUPER clean...which is a good thing, but can tend to leave a show mead fairly singular, and somewhat 2 dimensional.
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Old 11-04-2008, 06:19 AM   #7
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Lot's of people do not heat the honey at all.
You can just put the container in warm water, then pour it straight into the fermentor with water and shake it till it more or less mixed. The yeast will seek out and eat the sugars.

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Old 11-04-2008, 01:32 PM   #8
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I pour the honey in cold water and mixed it well with a wine whip.
Hot water does make the process go quicker if you are mixing by hand.

D-47 is a good yeast for mead. You should be sure to add nutrients to your must to ensure a healthy ferment. Check out the FAQ in the sticky for some suggestions on nutrient additions.

Craig

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