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Old 10-25-2008, 04:55 PM   #1
BigStone777
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Default Apple Pulp at the bottom

Quick question... I just started a new batch... just a 3 gallon cyser made with fresh apple juice i made with a juicer, and raw honey.
I heated the juice with cinnamon sticks and cloves, just until almost boiling, and then backed off the heat and added honey... Then i left it on low heat for awhile, just steaming, and through this i was able to collect a lot of floaty nasty goo that comes to the top... after a cooling bath, i added it to my small carboy, and added a bit of water to equal 3 gal. After that, i shook it vigorously (for fun? aerate? whatever)... and then i let it sit to come down to room temperature.

Ok so my 'quick question' is... This morning i was admiring the beautiful auburn color of the must, and was about to pitch my yeast, when i noticed about an inch layer of fine apple pulp goo at the bottom... a dark brown color...
Before i pitch my yeast, should i go ahead and rack it, so as to leave the pulp layer behind? or should i just leave it in there and assume that it will add nutrient and flavor...?

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Another reason not to boil honey when making mead: Honey which comes from local bees carries pollen and pathogens relevant to your area. Consuming these natural medicines will boost your resistance to local pollens and other allergens. Boiling destroys them.
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Old 10-26-2008, 01:07 PM   #2
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It will be nutrient for the yeast to the point, otherwise it won't hurt it. My main question is, why did you wait so long before pitching the yeast? When you mixed up the must and aerated it, you should have pitched immediately. Did you use campden tablets? That's the only reason I can see for waiting to pitch the yeast. Anyway, aerate your must again, that will kick up the trub on the bottom, and then pitch your yeast. If you're using a wine yeast it will settle to the bottom with the apple trub, and feed off of it for nutrients.

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Old 10-26-2008, 01:20 PM   #3
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Thanks! Cheers!

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Another reason not to boil honey when making mead: Honey which comes from local bees carries pollen and pathogens relevant to your area. Consuming these natural medicines will boost your resistance to local pollens and other allergens. Boiling destroys them.
If all else fails, just drink more mead anyway...
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Old 10-27-2008, 02:05 AM   #4
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I would guess the brown "goo" at the bottom is from the spices and from pectins set during the boil. I never boil juice or honey. When I use spices, I don't add them till secondary; just my 2 cents worth. Regards, GF.

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Old 10-27-2008, 11:39 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gratus fermentatio View Post
I would guess the brown "goo" at the bottom is from the spices and from pectins set during the boil. I never boil juice or honey. When I use spices, I don't add them till secondary; just my 2 cents worth. Regards, GF.
What i actually did is boiled the spices with a little water, boiled them hard until the water was cinnamon color, and then added the apple juice, heated it to nearly boiling, and then added the honey. Held it at low heat for awhile, and then cooled it.
The goo was mostly apple goo. The same goo will settle if i have put just apple juice in a jar. Its either my juicer, or my juicing method.
I ended up racking off of the goo, as a friend of mine suggested it.
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Another reason not to boil honey when making mead: Honey which comes from local bees carries pollen and pathogens relevant to your area. Consuming these natural medicines will boost your resistance to local pollens and other allergens. Boiling destroys them.
If all else fails, just drink more mead anyway...
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