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Old 07-22-2013, 09:51 PM   #1
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Default another My First Mead...very basic recipe.

So I figured I would dive right in and try it. I have had commercial Mead (yuck) and home brewed (way delicious)!!

My recipe:
7.5 lbs clover honey
3g reverse osmosis water
Champagne Yeast

Fermenting in a 3g carboy for the last 3 months. Still percolating.

What next? Wait until my FG is .990?? My goal is that I want sweet versus dry mead.

The pics below were taken over a month ago. I was monitoring the honey level. When I look now, there isn't any honey at the bottom.



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Old 07-22-2013, 09:56 PM   #2
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Time is the most important ingredient.

All the honey was just sitting on the bottom? Did you mix the honey in at all? But it is all gone now? Interesting.

FWIW, I usually pour in some water, then my honey, shake like hell, and if it all won't dissolve I run warm water over the carboy to heat it up gently, just enough to get the honey mixed in.

Did you take an OG, by the way?

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Old 07-22-2013, 10:16 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by StoneArcher View Post

All the honey was just sitting on the bottom? Did you mix the honey in at all? But it is all gone now? Interesting.

FWIW, I usually pour in some water, then my honey, shake like hell, and if it all won't dissolve I run warm water over the carboy to heat it up gently, just enough to get the honey mixed in.
It really isn't important for ALL of the honey to be mixed with the water - the yeast will still get it, even if a lot of it sinks straight to the bottom.
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Old 07-22-2013, 11:39 PM   #4
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I see that now. Good to know. Always learning, thanks to this place!

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Old 07-22-2013, 11:48 PM   #5
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But, if its not mixed in you cant measure it with a hydrometer and why make the yeast work harder at the honey water interface? WVMJ

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Old 07-23-2013, 12:25 AM   #6
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OG is exactly why I always mix thoroughly. But I suppose if its a tried recipe OG is already known.

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Old 08-11-2013, 03:43 AM   #7
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Well, I racked it over today, about 4 months after I added the yeast. I tasted it and I love it!! Gonna let is run in the secondary for another couple months.

I have another bigger batch running right now. It's a 7g batch with roughly 24lbs of Sourwood Honey. This time I mixed it!!

Gonna have to get another batch going in another couple months.

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Old 08-11-2013, 07:43 AM   #8
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It really isn't important for ALL of the honey to be mixed with the water - the yeast will still get it, even if a lot of it sinks straight to the bottom.
If you want any kind of accuracy in what you're doing then yes its very important that its correctly mixed in.

If you're happy that you haven't overdone it with the fermentable sugars then fine, a layer at the bottom will eventually get munched by the yeast.

Mixing the honey in correctly helps reduce the need for early stage aeration some. Having air/O2 present helps with yeast colony development in the early stages......

So while you're not wrong, you're not right either, it just depends on how the maker wants to proceed.

Just my tuppence worth.......
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Old 08-11-2013, 07:52 AM   #9
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Well, I racked it over today, about 4 months after I added the yeast. I tasted it and I love it!! Gonna let is run in the secondary for another couple months.

I have another bigger batch running right now. It's a 7g batch with roughly 24lbs of Sourwood Honey. This time I mixed it!!

Gonna have to get another batch going in another couple months.
Well done. Don't forget, costs aside, its easy to get carried away. There is a point where batch size becomes an issue, not with quantity per se, but with batch temperatures during the ferment. Especially if a yeast is used that needs to be kept cooler, like D47 (below 70F/21C).

After all, fermentation is an exothermic reaction. Just because we don't notice it when making in relatively small quantities, doesn't mean its not a problem. It is, or more correctly, it can be if we don't keep an eye on temperature once we start to scale up.

Its the same as the "where" thing. Properly set up, commercial places have to think of ventilation. Because low lying or sheltered places, can make enough CO2, to become an issue once there's more than a certain amount being fermented. Sure its generally less of an issue for home brewers but not if you've got a couple of 5 gallon meads and maybe a beer or two going in a cellar........
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Old 08-12-2013, 01:48 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbloke View Post
Well done. Don't forget, costs aside, its easy to get carried away. There is a point where batch size becomes an issue, not with quantity per se, but with batch temperatures during the ferment. Especially if a yeast is used that needs to be kept cooler, like D47 (below 70F/21C).

After all, fermentation is an exothermic reaction. Just because we don't notice it when making in relatively small quantities, doesn't mean its not a problem. It is, or more correctly, it can be if we don't keep an eye on temperature once we start to scale up.

Its the same as the "where" thing. Properly set up, commercial places have to think of ventilation. Because low lying or sheltered places, can make enough CO2, to become an issue once there's more than a certain amount being fermented. Sure its generally less of an issue for home brewers but not if you've got a couple of 5 gallon meads and maybe a beer or two going in a cellar........
I have my fermenter running at 67 F right now, should I set my Mead in there?
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