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Old 07-09-2012, 04:16 PM   #1
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Default Advice on "Bobby Flay" mead

I'm going to split up my 5 gallons of show mead I made a year ago. One of them is going to be my Bobby Flay mead, or Pomegranate capsicumel.

My question, is, how would I impart a smoky spicy flavor into the mead? I loooove those cans of chipotle peppers packaged in adobo. And, I think that it would marry great with pomegranate.

I highly doubt that charring some chipotle peppers would get the flavor that I'm looking for. And, I don't have a smoker or grill.. Or should I just give up on my idea and throw in a dehydrated ancho pepper and see how that works out?

Oh, and if anyone is interested the 5 gallons will be split: show mead, rosemary, vanilla/oak, hibiscus, bobby flay.

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Old 07-09-2012, 04:28 PM   #2
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You will be able to find chipotle peppers on line very easily. There are two kinds, morita and dorado. Moritas are the little ones, they'll be what are in the cans in adobo. Dorado are larger brown ones. I use them interchangeably in cooking, generally, but I like the dorados. If you could find some you'd just have to soak a one or two in a gallon. And since you're in texas you'll probably have even easier access to peppers than I do here in vegas.

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Old 07-09-2012, 04:32 PM   #3
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@Double_D: They have all kinds of dried and fresh peppers at the supermarkets here. But, I don't think that popping them in the carboy will accomplish my intended flavor profile.

Have you used any of the peppers in your homebrews? If so, how have they turned out?

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Old 07-09-2012, 04:43 PM   #4
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You have to follow a procedure with the dried chiles before using them.

Remove seeds & stems - Toast in oven or skillet until darkened and fragrant, but not black/burnt - rehydrate in 180 F water for 10 minutes or, in this case, steep in the hot mead (pre-alcohol development).

Avoid using the canned chipotles packed in the tomato sauce, you'll have a mess on your hands.

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Old 07-09-2012, 04:44 PM   #5
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I can't imagine what you're going for then, it's common practice to just let them float for a little while. Like a dry hop. The brews turned out fine, a buddy and I made a jalapeno weissen. As for the supermarkets, I miss HEB with a passion. What do you want it to taste like?

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Old 07-09-2012, 04:47 PM   #6
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@bobbrews: That sounds like a winner. I knew I would have to rehydrate them, but was unsure if I should just stick it in the mead. In retrospect, seeds would impart some off flavors. My wife suggested the canned chipotles, but I struck it down. There's too many variables there. I don't want to put something in the mead that will screw it all up.

@Double_D: Sorry, I must have been unclear. I am looking for that kind of spicy and smoky taste that you get from the canned chipotles in adobo. But, I'm not sure if that is possible...

I've made some jalapeno and habanero liquers before, and they turned out great. I'm just not sure if I can get what I am looking for as far as the smoky profile.

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Old 07-09-2012, 10:16 PM   #7
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Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbrews View Post
steep in the hot mead (pre-alcohol development.
How hot are you making your must and why?
Another way you can impart a smokiness to any mead is to age it on some toasted oak cubes, you could try peppers and oak cubes in secondary, let it age and do tastings and then rack off of them when it reaches the spice and smokiness you are looking for.
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Old 07-10-2012, 02:49 AM   #8
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@TheBrewingMedic: Just to be clear, the mead is already finished fermentation. I will not be heating it up for the pepper. I will rehydrate it in water before adding it to the mead, though. I discussed the oak idea with my wife. I think I am going to see how it imparts its flavors with a different batch before I throw it in this one. I think its probably the best option though.

Would any medium toasted oak cubes work? Or, do you have a specific one in mind?

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Old 07-10-2012, 01:46 PM   #9
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How hot are you making your must and why?
I haven't made mead yet, suffice to say, I didn't even know what the equivalent of "wort" was called for mead. Thank you for that. I assume that mead is probably 100 F at it's hottest? Steeping the chiles at that temperature for a specific time is probably still better than adding them to a cold secondary. Rehydrated chiles aren't exactly as fragrant as hops or honey, but they are very flavorful.

The reason I commented on this is because I'm a professional chef, and being that my focus is Latin cuisine, I use a lot of dried chiles. The procedure I gave is how we infuse chile flavor in our soups, specifically Sopa Azteca. For mead, I would probably steep the dried, toasted chiles in the warm to hot "must" ...(instead of hot water before adding to a soup). The steep we do with our soup rinses any leftover debris and rehydrates the chiles, which are then boiled in the soup, and finally blended. I would skip a few steps there, chop up the toasted chiles and add to a steeping bag, rehydrate in the warm must, allow flavor to infuse, rack, and skip the final blending of the rehydrated chiles. Does this make sense in terms of using a similar technique for infusing chile flavor in mead?
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Old 07-10-2012, 01:56 PM   #10
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@TheBrewingMedic: Just to be clear, the mead is already finished fermentation. I will not be heating it up for the pepper. I will rehydrate it in water before adding it to the mead, though. I discussed the oak idea with my wife. I think I am going to see how it imparts its flavors with a different batch before I throw it in this one. I think its probably the best option though.

Would any medium toasted oak cubes work? Or, do you have a specific one in mind?
I like the medium toasted American oak cubes. you can also use chips, but I perfer the cubes because of their shape they have different level of toasting on them so you get a little more depth, they are also easier to deal with than wood chips. I used them in an acerglyn recently and everyone who has tasted it has commented how nice the smokiness is in it.
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