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Old 02-05-2009, 05:56 PM   #1
PhlyanPan
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Default Kegglementer?

Ok so here's what I've been thinking about lately. I have an old sanke keg laying around. I haven't completely determined if it's stainless or aluminimumimum (I'm pretending to be British today) but once I do I fully plan on converting it to a keggle.

Then I got to thinking, the only difference between a keg and a conical fermenter is the shape of the bottom. So....has anybody ever managed to convert a keg into a conical? I've read the whole thread about making a conical out of a toledo hopper and while it is pretty awesome, the raw materials are a bit more pricey than starting with my used sanke keg so I figured I'd see what people thought.

Basically I have 2 methods in mind as possibilities to make this happen.

1: weld some sort of funnel-like device on the bottom of the keg and cut the bottom out. Not sure where I'd get the funnel, maybe make one out of some sheet stainless (which I do have access to)

2: Form the bottom of the keg into a cone-shape with brute force, then drill a hole in the center for a valve.


Some things to keep in mind: I do have access to a plasma cutter and welder as well as some scrap stainless. While I haven't welded stainless myself, my father has with moderate success so hopefully welding won't be a big issue.


So basically, let me know what you think. I'm just sort of throwing this idea out there for comment. Ideas for a funnel that might work? Anyone have experience with the malleability of a keg bottom?

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Old 02-05-2009, 06:05 PM   #2
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So are you planning to boil your wort in this and then chill it and leave it so you can ferment right in the same vessel? the one quesiton I would have is what about removing the hop pieces and hot break that ends up at the bottom of the kettle?

I will say that brute force may be difficult because the thickness on the bottom isn't all that much and stretching it to make an actual "cone" may be troublesome.

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Old 02-05-2009, 06:09 PM   #3
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Chances are it's SS, not aluminium. (Oh no, where's Laughing Gnome? They do have a good point though... we don't say "titanum" or "uranum". )

You could just turn it upside down and cut a hole in the top (formerly bottom) and make a lid that seals it with a hole for an air lock. Then attach/weld valve(s) at the bottom (formerly top) to the hole. But this wouldn't be ideal because the angle of the "cone" would be awfully shallow.

Welding an SS cone to the bottom is theoretically possible, but it would need to be a very clean weld to avoid nooks and crannies for bacteria to hide.

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Old 02-05-2009, 06:11 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acidjazz54 View Post
So are you planning to boil your wort in this and then chill it and leave it so you can ferment right in the same vessel?
Not sure yet...maybe. I may just make it a dedicated conical...or if I can do everything in 1 vessel, maybe I will.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acidjazz54 View Post
the one quesiton I would have is what about removing the hop pieces and hot break that ends up at the bottom of the kettle?
I'm a huge fan of hop bags and have begun using them exclusively so the hops shouldn't be an issue really. I figured that I would just let the break out of the bottom through the valve like you would normally pull trub out of a conical.

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I will say that brute force may be difficult because the thickness on the bottom isn't all that much and stretching it to make an actual "cone" may be troublesome.
That is definitely a distinct possibility. Which is why I'd love to see someone comment who has experience with how malleable these things are.
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Old 02-05-2009, 07:08 PM   #5
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(Oh no, where's Laughing Gnome? They do have a good point though... we don't say "titanum" or "uranum". )
Though we do say "tantalum" and "molybdenum." Carry on.
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Old 02-06-2009, 02:08 AM   #6
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I'm a huge fan of hop bags and have begun using them exclusively so the hops shouldn't be an issue really. I figured that I would just let the break out of the bottom through the valve like you would normally pull trub out of a conical.
That makes a lot more sense. I haven't used hop bags yet but I just got done cutting my three kegs and may start using them soon. I was thinking for my conical actually using two valves with a piece of pipe between them kind of like the "V" Vessel has to minimize loss of perfectly good beer.


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That is definitely a distinct possibility. Which is why I'd love to see someone comment who has experience with how malleable these things are.
As I said I just cut three of them open and I wouldn't describe them as very malleable. Having dealt plenty with steel and aluminum and comparing them with stainless I do know that stainless is a bitch to machine, drill, and cut comparatively.
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Old 02-06-2009, 02:17 AM   #7
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Though we do say "tantalum" and "molybdenum." Carry on.
....Touché.
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