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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Kettles, Mash Tuns, & Hot Liquor Tanks > New cooler mash tun setup
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Old 03-30-2009, 11:30 PM   #1
Punx Clever
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Default New cooler mash tun setup

Hey all, I just recently updated my mash tun to a manifold instead of a stainless braid. Setup went EXTREMELY well and works like a charm with no leaks.

Materials:
40qt igloo ice cube cooler (the one without wheels... dont think it can be bought anymore)
1/2" brass ball valve (can be disassembled and cleaned)
1/2" Male adapter
4x 1/2" elbow
1/2" cross
1/2" t
~3 ft of 1/2" pipe
1/2" male to 3/8" tube nipple

Pictures:



The bulkhead is constructed using the plastic washer and o-ring that came on the original drain. Only difference is that the male adapter is pushing on the washer instead of the drain. The manifold is constructed like all manifolds, so I didn't include a picture.

Overall, I'm much happier with this than my previous setup and can't wait to try it out soon!

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Old 03-30-2009, 11:42 PM   #2
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Very nice! well done

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Old 03-31-2009, 01:30 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Punx Clever View Post
Hey all, I just recently updated my mash tun to a manifold instead of a stainless braid. Setup went EXTREMELY well and works like a charm with no leaks.

Materials:
40qt igloo ice cube cooler (the one without wheels... dont think it can be bought anymore)
1/2" brass ball valve (can be disassembled and cleaned)
1/2" Male adapter
4x 1/2" elbow
1/2" cross
1/2" t
~3 ft of 1/2" pipe
1/2" male to 3/8" tube nipple

Pictures:



The bulkhead is constructed using the plastic washer and o-ring that came on the original drain. Only difference is that the male adapter is pushing on the washer instead of the drain. The manifold is constructed like all manifolds, so I didn't include a picture.

Overall, I'm much happier with this than my previous setup and can't wait to try it out soon!
Just to verify, that's CPVC not PVC? It's hard to tell from the picture, but it looks like white PVC pipe, which you don't want to use in a mashtun.

Looks nice otherwise.
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Old 04-02-2009, 12:22 AM   #4
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not trying to bust your balls here dude but at 1600x1200 rez, think you could have got a little more of the cooler in the shots ?

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Old 04-02-2009, 12:24 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomebrewJeff View Post
Just to verify, that's CPVC not PVC? It's hard to tell from the picture, but it looks like white PVC pipe, which you don't want to use in a mashtun.

Looks nice otherwise.

Its not under pressure. i dont think it makes a dimes bit of deference.
take a look:
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazypup View Post
Posted by lazypup (lazypup@yahoo.com) on Wed, Feb 8, 06 at 13:05

I have been in the Plumbing trade for nearly 4 decades and throughout that time every time I noted a change to the codes I made it a personal point to find out the underlying reasoning for the changes. To date I have yet to find any change that does not make perfect sense once you find out what prompted the change.
In the case of PVC, when it was first introduced into the plumbing trade in the mid 60's it was approved for all potable water systems, both supply and distribution. At that time it was also a common practice to operate water heaters at or near 180degF.

It was soon discovered that PVC will exhibit wall softening and glue joint failures at temperatures approaching 150degF, which explains why the ASTM standard for PVC now limits it to applications not exceeding 140degF. )

The PVC formula was then improved upon to create CPVC which can withstand temps up to 190DegF for a short time.

Initially the codes were ammended permitting PVC in the cold water service, but requiring CPVC in all "Hot Water" applications, however this lead to a lot of confusion amongst the general public and it was soon discovered that homeowners and DIY'ers were erroneously using the PVC in applications that required CPVC. It must also be noted that initially CPVC was made in the same white color and to the same Sched.40 dimensional specifications as was the PVC which then lead to a lot of confusion by mixing both the pipe and fittings. CPVC is still made to sched.40 specs and the only method of distinguishing the two materials is to actually read the labelling printed on the pipe wall.

The CPVC that is commonly used for distribution piping today is not made to ASTM pipe Schedule standards, but rather it is CPVC-CTS,(Copper Tube Standard) which explains the difference in overall tube dimension.

In order to further enhance the differences between the materials the ASTM introduced a color coding system for plastic piping.

ABS pipe is made in Black.
PVC pipe is made in White, Gray, (rarely in blue) and Clear. The gray color is primarily only used for shed.20 and sched.40 dimension and is primarily intended to be used as electrical conduit. PVC clear pipe & fittings is used in commercial and industrial applications that were formerly constructed of Glass pipe, and limited to applications not exceeding 140degF working temps.

There is a variation of PVC pipe that is made to ASTM "SDR" (Size Dimension Ratio)standard and may only be used for sanitary and storm sewer applications outside of a structure. (SDR, Size dimension Ratio is a standard that was originally used to define the thickness of concrete sewer pipe walls. Under the SDR standard the average thickness of the pipe wall is determined by dividing the pipe diameter by the SDR reference number. By example, a 4" PVC SDR-35 pipe would have a wall thickness equal to 4"/35= 0.114".

The codes specifically state that all PVC piping used to make the DWV (Drain, waste & Vent) system within a structure MUST BE schedule 40. ( You may not use SDR pipe within a structure)

CPVC is made in white and the creme color that we most often see in the local hardwares, big box stores or plumbing supply houses. In addition to the CTS standard it is also made in sched.40, sched.80, sched.100, sched.120 and rarely in sched.180
.
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Old 04-02-2009, 01:09 AM   #6
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interesting...so i guess pvc is limited physically rather than chemicaly sp?. i for one have assumed that pvc was not good for hot applications based on chemical make up and possible leaching. ?? Thanks

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Old 04-03-2009, 03:16 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clayton View Post
Its not under pressure. i dont think it makes a dimes bit of deference.
take a look:
It's not the pressure that's a concern, it's the acidity of the mash. It's much lower than regular tap water, so there is a concern about chemicals leaching from the plastic. This is what I've read, so please research to verify.

Also, from your post:

Quote:
It was soon discovered that PVC will exhibit wall softening and glue joint failures at temperatures approaching 150degF, which explains why the ASTM standard for PVC now limits it to applications not exceeding 140degF. )

The PVC formula was then improved upon to create CPVC which can withstand temps up to 190DegF for a short time.
PVC is rated to 140F, where mash temps will be 150F and higher, if you are mashing out, it may get it up to 168-170.

That's my story anyway.
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