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-   -   Wormaeter, free,quick,effective, wort aerator! (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f256/wormaeter-free-quick-effective-wort-aerator-383836/)

aarong 01-23-2013 08:13 AM

1 Attachment(s)

Here is another photo


aarong 01-25-2013 12:55 AM

5 Attachment(s)

For this experiment I wanted to find what aeration method put the most air in wort without buying a pump or pure oxygen.

So I did some research and found a diffused oxygen meter. The problem is that they cost a ton of money.

The cheapest way to test this that I could think of was using soap and water and making bubbles( who doesn't like bubbles)

Soap Bubbles are a thin layer of soap surrounding air.

Theoretically more bubbles equals more air.

To test this I took an empty jug and filled it with soapy water to the top. I then shook it as hard as I could and got no bubbles.

Photo 1

Next I drained half of the jug shook it violently like a bar tender and it created a thick layer of bubbles on top. Therefore the air in the free space mixed with the soap and water and it created soap bubbles.

Photo 2

So using the assumption more bubbles = more air I set up a simple experiment.

I took a pot and put soap and water in it and mixed it up with a spoon. This is the water I used for each experiment (control water). This is to make sure I had the same concentration of soap and water in each test.

I then took the same jug and drew a line on it. This is where I will fill it for each experiment.

I filled the jug by taking a siphons hose and filling the jug from the bottom up avoiding any air entering the soapy water.

So here are the photos of each test in the order I tested it
1) no shaking

Photo 3

2) vigorous shake (bartender) 40 seconds

Photo 2

3) siphon on top of spoon

Photo 4

4) rock the jug back and forth without picking up the jug. I did this as violent as possible for 40 seconds.

Photo 5


aarong 01-25-2013 12:55 AM

5 Attachment(s)

For this experiment I wanted to find what aeration method put the most air in wort without buying a pump or pure oxygen.

So I did some research and found a diffused oxygen meter. The problem is that they cost a ton of money.

The cheapest way to test this that I could think of was using soap and water and making bubbles( who doesn't like bubbles)

Soap Bubbles are a thin layer of soap surrounding air.

Theoretically more bubbles equals more air.

To test this I took an empty jug and filled it with soapy water to the top. I then shook it as hard as I could and got no bubbles.

Photo 1

Next I drained half of the jug shook it violently like a bar tender and it created a thick layer of bubbles on top. Therefore the air in the free space mixed with the soap and water and it created soap bubbles.

Photo 2

So using the assumption more bubbles = more air I set up a simple experiment.

I took a pot and put soap and water in it and mixed it up with a spoon. This is the water I used for each experiment (control water). This is to make sure I had the same concentration of soap and water in each test.

I then took the same jug and drew a line on it. This is where I will fill it for each experiment.

I filled the jug by taking a siphons hose and filling the jug from the bottom up avoiding any air entering the soapy water.

So here are the photos of each test in the order I tested it
1) no shaking

Photo 3

2) vigorous shake (bartender) 40 seconds

Photo 2

3) siphon on top of spoon

Photo 4

4) rock the jug back and forth without picking up the jug. I did this as violent as possible for 40 seconds.

Photo 5


aarong 01-25-2013 12:55 AM

5 Attachment(s)

For this experiment I wanted to find what aeration method put the most air in wort without buying a pump or pure oxygen.

So I did some research and found a diffused oxygen meter. The problem is that they cost a ton of money.

The cheapest way to test this that I could think of was using soap and water and making bubbles( who doesn't like bubbles)

Soap Bubbles are a thin layer of soap surrounding air.

Theoretically more bubbles equals more air.

To test this I took an empty jug and filled it with soapy water to the top. I then shook it as hard as I could and got no bubbles.

Photo 1

Next I drained half of the jug shook it violently like a bar tender and it created a thick layer of bubbles on top. Therefore the air in the free space mixed with the soap and water and it created soap bubbles.

Photo 2

So using the assumption more bubbles = more air I set up a simple experiment.

I took a pot and put soap and water in it and mixed it up with a spoon. This is the water I used for each experiment (control water). This is to make sure I had the same concentration of soap and water in each test.

I then took the same jug and drew a line on it. This is where I will fill it for each experiment.

I filled the jug by taking a siphons hose and filling the jug from the bottom up avoiding any air entering the soapy water.

So here are the photos of each test in the order I tested it
1) no shaking

Photo 3

2) vigorous shake (bartender) 40 seconds

Photo 2

3) siphon on top of spoon

Photo 4

4) rock the jug back and forth without picking up the jug. I did this as violent as possible for 40 seconds.

Photo 5


aarong 01-25-2013 12:55 AM

5 Attachment(s)

For this experiment I wanted to find what aeration method put the most air in wort without buying a pump or pure oxygen.

So I did some research and found a diffused oxygen meter. The problem is that they cost a ton of money.

The cheapest way to test this that I could think of was using soap and water and making bubbles( who doesn't like bubbles)

Soap Bubbles are a thin layer of soap surrounding air.

Theoretically more bubbles equals more air.

To test this I took an empty jug and filled it with soapy water to the top. I then shook it as hard as I could and got no bubbles.

Photo 1

Next I drained half of the jug shook it violently like a bar tender and it created a thick layer of bubbles on top. Therefore the air in the free space mixed with the soap and water and it created soap bubbles.

Photo 2

So using the assumption more bubbles = more air I set up a simple experiment.

I took a pot and put soap and water in it and mixed it up with a spoon. This is the water I used for each experiment (control water). This is to make sure I had the same concentration of soap and water in each test.

I then took the same jug and drew a line on it. This is where I will fill it for each experiment.

I filled the jug by taking a siphons hose and filling the jug from the bottom up avoiding any air entering the soapy water.

So here are the photos of each test in the order I tested it
1) no shaking

Photo 3

2) vigorous shake (bartender) 40 seconds

Photo 2

3) siphon on top of spoon

Photo 4

4) rock the jug back and forth without picking up the jug. I did this as violent as possible for 40 seconds.

Photo 5


aarong 01-25-2013 12:55 AM

5 Attachment(s)

For this experiment I wanted to find what aeration method put the most air in wort without buying a pump or pure oxygen.

So I did some research and found a diffused oxygen meter. The problem is that they cost a ton of money.

The cheapest way to test this that I could think of was using soap and water and making bubbles( who doesn't like bubbles)

Soap Bubbles are a thin layer of soap surrounding air.

Theoretically more bubbles equals more air.

To test this I took an empty jug and filled it with soapy water to the top. I then shook it as hard as I could and got no bubbles.

Photo 1

Next I drained half of the jug shook it violently like a bar tender and it created a thick layer of bubbles on top. Therefore the air in the free space mixed with the soap and water and it created soap bubbles.

Photo 2

So using the assumption more bubbles = more air I set up a simple experiment.

I took a pot and put soap and water in it and mixed it up with a spoon. This is the water I used for each experiment (control water). This is to make sure I had the same concentration of soap and water in each test.

I then took the same jug and drew a line on it. This is where I will fill it for each experiment.

I filled the jug by taking a siphons hose and filling the jug from the bottom up avoiding any air entering the soapy water.

So here are the photos of each test in the order I tested it
1) no shaking

Photo 3

2) vigorous shake (bartender) 40 seconds

Photo 2

3) siphon on top of spoon

Photo 4

4) rock the jug back and forth without picking up the jug. I did this as violent as possible for 40 seconds.

Photo 5


aarong 01-25-2013 12:56 AM

3 Attachment(s)

5) Venturi attachment in line with the hose and running it to the bottom

Photo 6

6) Venturi attachment in line with the hose and running it on top

Photo 7

7) pouring in a funnel

Photo 8

Results in order of most bubbles(air) to least.

1) picking up the bucket and shaking vigorously like a bartender shaking a drink.
2) Venturi effect (Wormaeter) pouring on top
3) Venturi effect (Wormaeter) directly to the bottom
4) pouring through a funnel
5) siphoning on top of a spoon
6) rocking back and forth hard while keeping the bottom of the bucket on the ground(rocking method)
7) siphoning to the bottom of the bucket and doing nothing

Conclusion

The most effective way to aerate is to pick up the bucket and shake the crap out if it. Unfortunately I do 6 gallon batches so I can't pick it up and shake it like a bartender without pulling a muscle.

The next effective way is an inline Venturi which sucked air in with the soapy water and created a large amount of bubbles=air.

So for me the winner is the Venturi tube. It is simple it does not involve lifting the bucket and shaking it and it seemed to add the most amount of air to the water.

Sweet


aarong 01-25-2013 12:56 AM

3 Attachment(s)

5) Venturi attachment in line with the hose and running it to the bottom

Photo 6

6) Venturi attachment in line with the hose and running it on top

Photo 7

7) pouring in a funnel

Photo 8

Results in order of most bubbles(air) to least.

1) picking up the bucket and shaking vigorously like a bartender shaking a drink.
2) Venturi effect (Wormaeter) pouring on top
3) Venturi effect (Wormaeter) directly to the bottom
4) pouring through a funnel
5) siphoning on top of a spoon
6) rocking back and forth hard while keeping the bottom of the bucket on the ground(rocking method)
7) siphoning to the bottom of the bucket and doing nothing

Conclusion

The most effective way to aerate is to pick up the bucket and shake the crap out if it. Unfortunately I do 6 gallon batches so I can't pick it up and shake it like a bartender without pulling a muscle.

The next effective way is an inline Venturi which sucked air in with the soapy water and created a large amount of bubbles=air.

So for me the winner is the Venturi tube. It is simple it does not involve lifting the bucket and shaking it and it seemed to add the most amount of air to the water.

Sweet


aarong 01-25-2013 12:56 AM

3 Attachment(s)

5) Venturi attachment in line with the hose and running it to the bottom

Photo 6

6) Venturi attachment in line with the hose and running it on top

Photo 7

7) pouring in a funnel

Photo 8

Results in order of most bubbles(air) to least.

1) picking up the bucket and shaking vigorously like a bartender shaking a drink.
2) Venturi effect (Wormaeter) pouring on top
3) Venturi effect (Wormaeter) directly to the bottom
4) pouring through a funnel
5) siphoning on top of a spoon
6) rocking back and forth hard while keeping the bottom of the bucket on the ground(rocking method)
7) siphoning to the bottom of the bucket and doing nothing

Conclusion

The most effective way to aerate is to pick up the bucket and shake the crap out if it. Unfortunately I do 6 gallon batches so I can't pick it up and shake it like a bartender without pulling a muscle.

The next effective way is an inline Venturi which sucked air in with the soapy water and created a large amount of bubbles=air.

So for me the winner is the Venturi tube. It is simple it does not involve lifting the bucket and shaking it and it seemed to add the most amount of air to the water.

Sweet



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