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-   -   Removing a Load Bearing Wall (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f256/removing-load-bearing-wall-362286/)

kosmokramer 10-20-2012 03:13 PM

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Quote:
Originally Posted by VegasJ View Post
I design & engineer joists, beams, metal plated trusses for a living. Been doing it for about 8 yrs now. I'm not a registered engineer, not too many designers are...

but I have knowledge.

If a load bearing wall is removed yes a beam will need to go into place to take the load coming down from the roof to spread the loads into the foundation.

Now if you remove a load bearing wall & replace it with a header, you create 2 point loads on the foundation instead of 1 uniformed load (from the wall removed). If these point loads do not exceed the capacity of the foundation you can get away with just placing the header/beam in & posting down to the floor.

But if these point loads DO exceed the cap of the concrete in the foundation, it should be dug out & footings put in place at the post point loads.

need drawings I can do some up, just need dimensions of the roof/walls & your location for typical loading/bldg codes used



edit: just reread the OP... 1920's house I'm willing to bet the concrete has no bldg code specs in design used today. LoL

also, is this load bearing wall over concrete or over a basement & sitting on a wood floor?

Big difference here... you would have to beef up below also since you are converting a uniformed load form above to 2 point loads.
The house is on a raised riverrock foundation (those damn rocks are everywhere here) the total span is 150 and i would like to remove 115. Here are a couple pic

kosmokramer 10-20-2012 03:13 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by VegasJ View Post
I design & engineer joists, beams, metal plated trusses for a living. Been doing it for about 8 yrs now. I'm not a registered engineer, not too many designers are...

but I have knowledge.

If a load bearing wall is removed yes a beam will need to go into place to take the load coming down from the roof to spread the loads into the foundation.

Now if you remove a load bearing wall & replace it with a header, you create 2 point loads on the foundation instead of 1 uniformed load (from the wall removed). If these point loads do not exceed the capacity of the foundation you can get away with just placing the header/beam in & posting down to the floor.

But if these point loads DO exceed the cap of the concrete in the foundation, it should be dug out & footings put in place at the post point loads.

need drawings I can do some up, just need dimensions of the roof/walls & your location for typical loading/bldg codes used



edit: just reread the OP... 1920's house I'm willing to bet the concrete has no bldg code specs in design used today. LoL

also, is this load bearing wall over concrete or over a basement & sitting on a wood floor?

Big difference here... you would have to beef up below also since you are converting a uniformed load form above to 2 point loads.
The house is on a raised riverrock foundation (those damn rocks are everywhere here) the total span is 150 and i would like to remove 115. Here are a couple pic

kosmokramer 10-24-2012 04:59 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by VegasJ View Post

That's why I asked on the spans... I was referring to the spans of the roof trusses that bear on that wall. Knowing that & the material on the roof, I can estimate the loads a beam would be taking.

Now down through the posts... you said below you have a crawl space. Concrete pillars or more posts in the ground would need to be added to support the posts in the wall carrying the beam, carrying the trusses.
I will measure tomarrow after work. I think it is difficult to measure because not far from that wall it goes into sort of a pyramid. here is a link to what im talking about. Im not sure if thats where the peak ends but it looks like the support to the left in the first couple seconds is about where the opening would start. also here is a redfin pic of the outside.
the roof is pretty heavy right now with 1 layer of wood shingles and 2 layers of asphalt composite shingles. A new roof is in the budget for next year
Is this what goes under the house?http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...1#.UIdqyWed6So


click on this pic

kosmokramer 11-17-2012 02:14 PM

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Heres an update pic... id be done if it wasnt for all the dang overtime


kosmokramer 11-17-2012 02:14 PM

2 Attachment(s)

Heres an update pic... id be done if it wasnt for all the dang overtime


kosmokramer 11-20-2012 09:51 AM

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Thanks vegas... ya it opened up the room a ton. Alot more natural light now.

Another question for anybody that might be able to help.... im trying to figure what the minimum support for the counter will be. It will have an 8" overhang on one side, 4" sitting on the ponywall, and 13" overhang on the kitchen side. I grabbed 4 L brackets from home depot that look like this

http://www.architecturaldepot.com/BK...n-bracket.html

I was going to attach these directly to the studs using lag bolts and then drywall over the top on the side with 13". Will that be enough?


kosmokramer 12-01-2012 12:52 AM

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TAnother question for anybody that can help. The current access point to the attic area is in the kitchen, which i really dont like. In the hallway there is an old whole house fan that is no longer wired up. I want to rwmove the fan and put the access there and use the fan motor for my grain mil possibly. The problem is that a rafter runs right across. Question is, can i cut it? Here are some pics


kosmokramer 12-01-2012 12:52 AM

2 Attachment(s)

TAnother question for anybody that can help. The current access point to the attic area is in the kitchen, which i really dont like. In the hallway there is an old whole house fan that is no longer wired up. I want to rwmove the fan and put the access there and use the fan motor for my grain mil possibly. The problem is that a rafter runs right across. Question is, can i cut it? Here are some pics


kosmokramer 12-02-2012 12:59 AM

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Here's a close up


shelly_belly 12-07-2012 05:40 PM

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Cut it. Go to the next full joist in either direction of the opening and double it up (either side of the joist, whichever is convenient). Cut the joist out and then box it in with 2 more members per side. Here's how it should look. You may have more than one cut joist in the opening, I only drew one.

Grey - Walls
Green - Existing joists
Red - New framing
Blue - Optional blocking to make the opening the size you want. May need to double up if trimming the hole with moulding wider than 1.5"



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