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Old 06-02-2009, 03:34 AM   #111
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Subscribed, that is incredible. I'm not easily this impressed.

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Old 06-02-2009, 06:52 AM   #112
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Keep the faith and wait for the beer to come into its own, lol. I can't wait till we are malting like we are brewing on here!!! It is coming and COLObrewer has planted the seeds of change. Grow it, malt it, brew it!

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Old 06-21-2009, 02:21 PM   #113
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Fellow brewers, Thought I'd update you on the home malt efforts, I used an old electric oven to create some roasted malts/barley as follows: I utilized one of the same hoards that I used in the kiln and roasted 5lbs at a time. All of it was roasted at about 350F at different durations, turning almost continuously. Make certain you do this outside as there is a ton of thick smoke while roasting. I will be utilizing some of these specialty grains (along with the malt I smoked earlier) for a planned smoked porter or smoked ale, all I need now is crystal and I will be able to make a dark beer completely from home malt (Crystal coming soon). I will also use a step mash with protein rest on the next batch(es).

Here is the black malt, roasted for 1 hour, turned about every 5 minutes:


Here is the Chocolate malt, roasted for 1/2 hour, turned about every 5 min:


And the Roasted Barley, roasted for about 3 hours, sprayed with water and turned about every 5 minutes, This was some of the same raw "seed" barley I used in the malting process:


Yet another labor intensive process that needs to be automated with some sort of rotating/heating device. The rotating bin I made for the kiln would not work for this due to the max temp of HDME being about 260F? Also the old freezer I use for kilning has some sort of plastic at the door seams. Currently I'm thinking of ditching the plastic rotating bin and making one completely out of stainless or brass screen with a shaft through the sides for the kiln as well as another one to fit in this old oven for roasting purposes. Possibly I can make them so the drive will be interchangeable so I can move it from kiln to oven readily.

In the mean time we've drained the home malt keg and the Rahr is almost empty, I popped a couple of bottles that have been in the cellar since bottled on 5-14, so about a month. Here is a pic of them, showing the Rahr (Right) has cleared but the home malt has not cleared yet, also notice there is more head on the home malt for some reason and it is more carbonated, it also retained the head throughout slurpage. Both tasted good with close to the same flavors/aromas as before:


And a pic next to a strong scotch ale sample from a batch I was kegging at the time (for comparison):


That is all

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Old 06-24-2009, 09:01 PM   #114
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crap I just typed this message and prosted before posted, and lost the text, so I will try to remember what I typed.

The grains look great, I'm sure they smelled amazing, too. I think the SS rotating drum is a solid idea, with a port for the shaft in the oven.
So pardon my ignorance, but is the roasted barley not malted? What does the spraying with water do?
Also, I assume the 350 is an ideal temp for roasting, how will the process differ for the crystal malts?
Thanks
-Ben

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Old 06-26-2009, 04:44 PM   #115
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Yes the roasted barley is not malted, it gives a different coffee or roasted flavor for stouts, porters, etc. Also a nutty flavor for browns, etc. It's also used for color I think, deep red or brown colors.

The water spray is to keep the barley from flaming, for some reason raw barley will catch fire easier than malted barley, or so I've read.

Crystal malt is created from green malt (malted barley yet to be kiln dried). The process as I understand right now is to malt it, then kiln it enough to get the surface moisture off, then "mash" it whole to convert the starch to sugar so that it retains the longer chains (which are less fermentable) inside the whole kernel (crystalizing). That is what causes the retention of sweetness during the brewing process.

I don't know why it wouldn't work to simply soak whole pale malt for a period, then mash it whole for the same effect? You would still want to kiln it for grinding/storage and obtaining the different colors of crystal.

As far as I can tell, the different lovibond rating is obtained by the length of kilning/roasting after the crystalizing process, I've yet to determine any set length of time for creating say crystal 30L over say crystal 80L. The darker it is supposedly the more malt flavor, don't know why that would be yet.

As far as temperatures go, 350F was working good so that is what I stayed with, I think some maltsters go as high as 425F for different malts and roasted barley.

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Old 06-26-2009, 08:53 PM   #116
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Quote:
Originally Posted by COLObrewer View Post
Could be, do they (Carcinogens) have a slightly smokey, slightly astringent flavor?
Its possible the astringent flavor is coming from the husks. If this was feed-grade barley (lower quality) there was probably thicker husks and less bulk to the grain. The husks are probably whats contributing astringency.
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Old 06-26-2009, 10:16 PM   #117
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Epic. Simply epic.

*subscribed*

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Old 07-21-2009, 03:32 PM   #118
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Quote:
Originally Posted by COLObrewer View Post
... Yet another labor intensive process that needs to be automated with some sort of rotating/heating device. The rotating bin I made for the kiln would not work for this due to the max temp of HDME being about 260F? Also the old freezer I use for kilning has some sort of plastic at the door seams. Currently I'm thinking of ditching the plastic rotating bin and making one completely out of stainless or brass screen with a shaft through the sides for the kiln as well as another one to fit in this old oven for roasting purposes. Possibly I can make them so the drive will be interchangeable so I can move it from kiln to oven readily...
Even though I'm a long way off from getting to this point in brewing, I'm loving this thread. I recently came across this coffee roaster drum that got me thinking of this project. It's a bit costly for the diy-er at $110 and only does small 5 lb batches. Maybe someone wanting to try this out with smaller batches on their grill. I posted it in another thread and got the suggestion that the holes might be a little too large and the grain might fall through. This could be avoided by attaching a stainless steel or aluminum screen to the outside of the barrel - though, to some, this might defeat the purpose of buying one, instead of building one, in the first place. At the very least, maybe you could copy the design.
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Old 07-21-2009, 04:41 PM   #119
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Quote:
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. . I recently came across this coffee roaster drum that got me thinking of this project.
That would be perfect for roasting/kilning although it would take more time to do enough pale for a batch, but perfect for roasting specialty grains. I hadn't thought of using the grill, of course then one would need the rotisserie. It appears the holes are not too big, but it's hard to tell from the pics, I would think the holes could be a little over 1/8", but not much. Great suggestion!

I'm currently looking at aquiring a commercial washer that has been removed from the building, it is all stainless inside and out and looks like it would hold 100lbs at least. It already has a large pulley on the drive end for turning, the holes on it MAY be too big though, easily fixed.
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Old 09-06-2009, 11:51 PM   #120
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COLObrewer, I like your setup. I've mimicked your malting / couching floor and had some pretty decent results, but I need some help. This is my first time malting my own grains. I'm struggling to keep the grains from molding during the germination phase. Do you have this problem? If so, do I just ignore the mold - because it dies in the drying process? I don't know!!!

I only have access to corn and wheat where I live. I haven't found any barley yet. So, for my first batch I purchased about 75 lbs of wheat for $5 at the local grain elevator. I took about 15 pounds put them in my brewing pot and covered them with water overnight. The next day, I spread them in the malting floor the next day. Each day I stirred them and dumped about a glass or two of water on them to keep them moist - maybe this was too much. How moist do you keep your grains during the germination phase?

I had some mold and instead of letting the mold destroy the whole batch (maybe it already had), I put the grains in the homemade dehydrator (similar to your fridge dehydrator, but without the fridge). I got the grains to dry and then the next day I poured 5 gallons of hot water over them and let them sit in a thermos/cooler at about 140 degrees F. I didn't get much specific gravity improvement over plain water. I let it sit overnight and the next day it smelled sour, but a little better (but not good) on the SG ~ 1.01 . I ended up throwing out the batch, fearing contamination.

The only things I could think of which I didn't do correctly were:
1. I had some mold in the germination phase
2. I didn't crack the wheat before mashing.

Sorry for the long post, but do you have any suggestions?

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