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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Brew Stands > Propane...Low Pressure, high pressure, orifices? What does it all mean?
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Old 11-19-2010, 06:21 PM   #1
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Default Propane...Low Pressure, high pressure, orifices? What does it all mean?

I'm slowly piecing together my single-tier brutus type system and have been scouring this forum for all of the information I can get on burners, regulators, solenoids and pilot lights.

I live in Florida where natural gas in your home is a rare commodity so I'll be using standard 20lb propane tanks to fire my stand. I love this hobby because I get to build things on my own. I also love it because it allows me to fuel my second favorite hobby of being a cheapskate and scouring the internet for sweat deals.

Anyway, I want to get the best bang for my buck overall when it comes to burners and propane. Since I'll be operating three different burners on brewday, I want to go with burners that aren't going to use up a whole tank of propane for a ten gallon batch. It's looking like low pressure uses less and all I would need is the appropriate regulator on my tank. However, will low pressure burners give me enough heat to efficiently boil 10-12 gallons of wort?

The jet burners look cool but seem to come with their own set of problems so I have been looking at these two from agrisupply.com:

BG-14 High Pressure Cast Iron Burner
http://www.agrisupply.com/product.as...cd2=1290186759

Burner Cast Low Pressure Multi-Hole 6"
http://www.agrisupply.com/burner-cas...82/cn/5400001/

Can I mix and match on the same regulator with these?

Then next step will be to automate two of them with solenoids and a pilot system. I've been looking at ASCO and Honeywell stuff but am not sure which types of valves to go with.

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Old 11-19-2010, 09:51 PM   #2
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There are literally hundreds of threads that deal with this exact subject. Do a search. You also talk about being a cheapskate but you will find very shortly that propane is anything but cheap.

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Old 11-19-2010, 11:38 PM   #3
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Many homebrewers have gone ahead of you with the low pressure propane and Honeywell valves which seem to work quite well for them. The standing pilot furnace valves and pilots are about the easiest to work with, and most cost effective method for safe gas burner control. With a budget figure of about $80 for each controlled burner,add $25-$30 for one transformer,and $30 for one low pressure regulator for entire system. The choices for temperature controllers are about the same in capability and priced around $45 or less, one each for each temperature controlled burner. If you are an Ebay shopper you can use the part numbers to purchase the components for less than new prices if time is not a factor, and you have patience
A parts list and links can be found in the various threads, or else PM me and I will send you part numbers and links to suppliers so you get started with pricing and purchasing.

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Old 11-20-2010, 01:08 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdustguy View Post
There are literally hundreds of threads that deal with this exact subject. Do a search. You also talk about being a cheapskate but you will find very shortly that propane is anything but cheap.
Isn't that the truth! The best price I've been able to find around here on a refill for a 20 lb. cylinder is $12, which will go about 5 standard (60 min. boil) brews. I'm thinking seriously about having our propane supplier run a line from our bulk tank to the garage (about 35 ft.) so that I can fuel my burner for about half.

However, after reading quite a bit about it on the forum, I've decided that if I really want to go cheap, electrifying my brew kettle is the way to go....there's no way that 220VAC isn't going to be far cheaper than the alternatives.
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Old 11-20-2010, 01:43 AM   #5
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Collins,

Hey brother I live in Jax out in Mandarin, and I just got done building a single tier setup with converted Sanke Kegs, (low pressure LP) BG-14 and the smaller 6" ones as well, burners controlled via Honeywell furnace valves ect.. I don't have any problem boiling 10-15 gallon batches. I also have well documented parts lists and drawings (which I will soon be sharing on here) that I can share with you if you like. I am actually going to be doing a Stone Levitation clone tomorrow afternoon with SWMBO, so if you aren't out burning holes in the sky PM me and you can come on by and check out the Puckered Penguin Brewery!!

Nick

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Old 11-20-2010, 03:43 AM   #6
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Sweet...I'd definitely like to check that out.

As far as all of the other threads that exist on the subject...I found many, but from all of the threads and the too many varying opinions, I was having trouble finding any discernible information.

My question still remains as to what, in the world of propane, is high pressure and what is low pressure?

I'm a cheapskate when it comes to purchasing parts and equipment. I like to save money where I can. I know propane, like gas in your car, is a neverending expense.

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Old 11-20-2010, 04:04 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by CollinsBrew View Post
Sweet...I'd definitely like to check that out.

As far as all of the other threads that exist on the subject...I found many, but from all of the threads and the too many varying opinions, I was having trouble finding any discernible information.

My question still remains as to what, in the world of propane, is high pressure and what is low pressure?

I'm a cheapskate when it comes to purchasing parts and equipment. I like to save money where I can. I know propane, like gas in your car, is a neverending expense.

Pretty big difference between high pressure, and low pressure. High pressure is 10 PSI, and low pressure is about 6 oz. Residential appliances run on low pressure. Usually outdoor items are high pressure. A grill for instance is low pressure, and a turkey fryer is high pressure. The benefit to using high pressure is an adjustable regulator. They are usually from 0 to 10 PSI. Hope that helps.
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Old 11-20-2010, 04:18 AM   #8
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Does this mean I can run low pressure and high pressure burners off of say, a 0-30psi regulator and control the low pressure one(s) with a needle valve?

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Old 11-20-2010, 04:40 AM   #9
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However, will low pressure burners give me enough heat to efficiently boil 10-12 gallons of wort?
It seems the whole premise of the question revolves around the above statement.

Yes indeed. LP-LP is a great setup to boil 10-12 gallon batches. My tank usually last at least 5 brews on Brutus, and I do some sanitizing also during every batch...
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Old 11-20-2010, 04:43 AM   #10
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Does this mean I can run low pressure and high pressure burners off of say, a 0-30psi regulator and control the low pressure one(s) with a needle valve?



Possibly...I think it would be a lot easier to use the same pressure burners if your going to run them on the same line. Once you get the needle valve set, if you change the h.p. Regulator you will be changing the needle valve again. It would be a never ending battle of twisting knobs. A low pressure burner can work on a high pressure regulator, but not at very high pressure. I actually have a low pressure burner from a water heater on a h.p. Regulator, and it can't be turned up very high before it stops working properly, but it does work.

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