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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Brew Stands > Improving my AG Indoor setup
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Old 09-15-2009, 07:13 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by tjferris View Post
how about something like this???


indoor all electric, check it out here:
Wort-O-Matic: Baltobrewer's Electric Stand
This looks ideal! However, it does have the whole "don't kill yourself" factor which scary. Also it is pretty sizable, but damn, sweet.
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Old 09-15-2009, 02:03 PM   #12
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http://blogs.homebrewtalk.com/Boerde..._full_brewery/

This system costs $2750 including a fermentation chamber, yeast management supplies and some other basics. It runs on 220VAC (not too tough to wire if you own your place) and takes up about 4 feet of counter space when setup. It would pack down easy and be easy to setup.

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Old 09-16-2009, 08:53 PM   #13
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I like the idea of a rectangle pot that sits on two burners but can't find such a thing. might have to fab one up but it would be good for indoor brewing.

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Old 09-16-2009, 10:06 PM   #14
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Here is what I would try.

Get a 4500W low density 240v water heater element and install it towards the bottom of your future boil kettle.

Wire it for 110V which makes it a 1200 Watt element, roughly 4100 BTUs.

If you really want gfci protection, you could use a gfci extension cord rated greater than 10 amps. Otherwise a 14 gauge extension cord will work. It is important to bond the ground to the pot somehow.

Now this will determine how adventurous you are . Make some kind of heat shield to protect the cable and element from the range burner. A fiberglass insulation sheathing on the cable may help. If the pot is much bigger than the burner then it may not be an issue at all.

Fire up the burner and plug it in and you got an extra 4100 BTUs. Adjust the boil by turning the burner up or down.

Do this and when you do have time and space to build a rig, your boil kettle is ready. Throw some 240v on it and call it a day.

it sounds a little unorthodox but give your criteria it may be what you need.

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Old 09-16-2009, 10:15 PM   #15
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b. I have a garage where
What's preventing you from brewing in the garage?
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Old 09-16-2009, 10:22 PM   #16
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What's preventing you from brewing in the garage?
It's detached, under someone else's property, no water, no gas, no good electricity. I think the electricity might even be charged to my neighbors bill. It is great for fermentation and storage, but there is no way I can use it to brew.
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Old 09-16-2009, 10:24 PM   #17
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Here is what I would try.

Get a 4500W low density 240v water heater element and install it towards the bottom of your future boil kettle.

Wire it for 110V which makes it a 1200 Watt element, roughly 4100 BTUs.

If you really want gfci protection, you could use a gfci extension cord rated greater than 10 amps. Otherwise a 14 gauge extension cord will work. It is important to bond the ground to the pot somehow.

Now this will determine how adventurous you are . Make some kind of heat shield to protect the cable and element from the range burner. A fiberglass insulation sheathing on the cable may help. If the pot is much bigger than the burner then it may not be an issue at all.

Fire up the burner and plug it in and you got an extra 4100 BTUs. Adjust the boil by turning the burner up or down.

Do this and when you do have time and space to build a rig, your boil kettle is ready. Throw some 240v on it and call it a day.

it sounds a little unorthodox but give your criteria it may be what you need.
This is the direction I have been thinking. The shielding of the cord from heat and the lack of GFCI are two of the weird things. I need to figure out which circuit my fridge is on so I can look into adding some GFCI.
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Old 09-16-2009, 10:40 PM   #18
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The shielding of the cord from heat and the lack of GFCI are two of the weird things.
I am sure the shielding can be addressed with a little research.

This is what I meant about the GFCI.
TRC ShockShield Inline GFCI Cord Set 120V/15A 6 FT - eBay (item 300342335282 end time Sep-26-09 06:54:28 PDT)

You don't have to install a new receptacle into the wall, it's built into the cord. So the only thing on the gfci is the brew pot.
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Old 09-16-2009, 10:41 PM   #19
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This is the direction I have been thinking. The shielding of the cord from heat and the lack of GFCI are two of the weird things. I need to figure out which circuit my fridge is on so I can look into adding some GFCI.
Before you start trying to replacing out side outlets, I would recommend checking your circuits and how the are wired. My home is 15 years old and I have 4 GFIC outlet inside and none outside, but the one in the master bath runs the light on my deck and the outlet in the deck. The one in the kitchen provides power and protection to the outlet on my porch. So it is possible depending on the age of your town home and local electrical code your outside outlet could be protected from the inside GFIC outlet.
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Old 09-16-2009, 10:49 PM   #20
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I am sure the shielding can be addressed with a little research.

This is what I meant about the GFCI.
TRC ShockShield Inline GFCI Cord Set 120V/15A 6 FT - eBay (item 300342335282 end time Sep-26-09 06:54:28 PDT)

You don't have to install a new receptacle into the wall, it's built into the cord. So the only thing on the gfci is the brew pot.
This is great! Then I don't have to worry about a soggy fridge.

If I do a removable heat stick, then I don't have to worry about shielding the heat right?

Does anyone know if a gas range needs 220v? If it does, then I probably have 220 right there also.
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