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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Brew Stands > BG14 low pressure conversion?
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Old 12-04-2011, 04:52 PM   #1
Tomahawk
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Default BG14 low pressure conversion?

Hi guys,

I have search overload...I'm a bit vapor locked...and could use some fine-tuned direction.

I'm at the propane plumbing part of my brewstand build (15gal keggles)
I have 2 BG14's (high-press) and one 6" (low-pressure) burners from Agri Supply. I have a 0-30 hi-pressure reg. These are the only propane system components I have at this time.

I plan on using flex hoses for burners feeding off 3/8" gas beam. Needle valves for each. (BG14 HLT / 6" MLT / BG14 Boil)

The Question: For efficiency's sake (not wasting fuel), should I convert the 14's to low pressure? If so, how?
(link to supplier that has the correct LP orfice for the BG14)

Cheers!

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Old 12-04-2011, 06:49 PM   #2
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For easiest control and ease of automation in the future I would recommend the low pressure route with conversion valves from Williams brewing HURRICANE BURNER LPG GAS VALVE @ Williams Brewing, and a Marshall 290 regulator. Even though the regulator is rated 160,000 Btu's it is more than enough for the 10" burners on low pressure (70 - 80K max), as you only run 1 wide open, the others are part open at same time.

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Old 12-05-2011, 02:29 AM   #3
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Thanks for the reply kladue.

Does the valve/orifice screw straight into the BG14 threads, or are you running some hose/pipe from the burner first?

Bonus...does the valve on this act as flame control too?

HURRICANE NATURAL GAS CONVERSION VALVE


With 290 requlator you mention, I wonder if all I need to control flame of each burner is the above valve/orifice?

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Old 12-05-2011, 02:44 AM   #4
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The orifice has to be installed at the venturi bell for it to work properly. This picture from the same site shows where that valve is to be installed.


Cheers!

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Old 12-05-2011, 02:53 AM   #5
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"Venturi bell". Good word to know. ;-)

Thanks for the pic. Still curious if the fitting also acts as a flame control?

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Old 12-05-2011, 01:08 PM   #6
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Yes, the built in valve can be used to control flame size, not always in a convenient place in a brew stand though.

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Old 12-05-2011, 02:17 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kladue View Post
Yes, the built in valve can be used to control flame size, not always in a convenient place in a brew stand though.
I'm guessing it's a plug type with a hole through it that aligns with the goes-into/comes-out-of ports (I'm sure there's a name for that type but darned if I can find one). Which means it's probably a rather fiddly valve wrt fine flame control as well, compared to either a needle valve or adjustable regulator...

Cheers!
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Old 12-05-2011, 05:23 PM   #8
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There aren't any substantial differences, if any at all, in efficiency between high and low pressure on the same burner with a properly sized orifice. For larger flames, the high pressure should actually be better than low pressure at pulling in fresh air, allowing more complete combustion. Whether a giant flame would get you more heat into your pot is another discussion.

High and low pressure are very subjective. The range is .5psi to 30psi. The 6" you have is 10psi max (I think), and the 10" is rated up to 30 psi. They will both work properly within that pressure range with the correct orifice. For automation purposes, kladue is recommending .5 psi to allow using some popular pilot/valve combos. You will lose some top end going with .5psi, but the top end is very inefficient, and not really necessary anyway. There are also high(er) pressure automation solutions available.

A needle valve essentially reduces/regulates the pressure delivered to the orifice. You could use your adjustable reg to find a max wide open pressure you like for the big burner, then use the needle valves to dial down the pressure for flame control on the small one (and large one). You will need to do some tuning of orifice size and pressure to get an adjustment range you like.

You will get better flame control by using a needle valve (like you say you already have) and a separate orifice, than the ball valve/orifice combo pictured. That will also allow you to have the flame control away from the "action". It get's hot near there you know, and some stands also don't angle the horn to convenient locations for access.

For best heat transfer, I have heard of guys using the smaller 6" for the BK. Theoretically, this allows a bigger flame in a more concentrated area, resulting in less flame blooming up the side of the pot and more heat into the pot. I haven't been able to find the thread again where the guy had done this. Pot size and shape makes a big difference, as does brew rig design.

If you are trying to reduce gas usage, making a heat shroud to direct/contain the heat up the sides of the kettle will greatly increase heat transfer, and loss to ambient especially on windy days.

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Old 12-08-2011, 02:28 AM   #9
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Let me digest that for a while....

Thanks for the responses gents!

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