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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Kegerators and Keezers > Painting the keezer.... in the cold?
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Old 12-12-2013, 04:33 PM   #1
fleetmack
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Default Painting the keezer.... in the cold?

I have a GE 7.0 chest freezer that I'm converting. Want to get it painted ASAP as it is sitting in my garage, and I have to park on the street until I can move the freezer to the house (which is after I'm done painting).

I've settled on black Rustoleum Epoxy spray paint. I plan on sanding the freezer down with 200 grit sandpaper, cleaning it off, then applying 2 coats of black paint to everything except the gasket.

Problem being - I'm in Denver. High temp of 51 today, and 44 tomorrow. So my question:

In my garage, if I use space heaters to heat up the garage for awhile, then open the garage door while I actually paint, then close the door to let it dry (again, with space heaters turned on)... will this work? Does the temp need to be above 50 degrees for the PAINTING portion or the DRYING portion? (or both?)

Thanks for the tips in advance, and for all the info you've all provided me in designing this thing thusfar!

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Old 12-12-2013, 05:19 PM   #2
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I'm no fabricator or painter, but I think it needs to be both. Now maybe if you have the garage at 50° and the keezer in there long enough to be at that temp. Move it outside to paint, then bring it back inside, it may not drop in temp enough.

I have tried to spray paint indoors with doors open and it didn't help enough. YMMV

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Old 12-12-2013, 05:24 PM   #3
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I see you are a Cyclone fan. That immediately gives your words massive credibility. I too, am a Cyclone... originally from Iowa (Carroll)

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Old 12-12-2013, 05:42 PM   #4
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Warm it up where you are painting, ( freezer too), take your spray cans, fill up the kitchen sink with the hottest water your water hear will make, (at it's normal use settings, mind you!!!), and float your cans in there.
Shake them about every 10 minutes, and you'll feel the contents start to come up to the water temp.
You may have to change the water, depending on the number of cans you float.

DON'T try to warm them any other way!

I consider myself an expert with a spray bomb, (), and I do this to my cans no matter what the weather, as they spray and atomize better.

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Old 12-12-2013, 07:49 PM   #5
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My experience with Rustoleum in cold temperatures didn't go well.
I found that the first coat went on well enough, second coat developed this cracked sort of look to it - didn't look good at all.

I'd recommend having proper temperature range if your after a nice finish.

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Old 12-14-2013, 06:56 AM   #6
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I agree with cramar. I also had a bad experience with pushing the temp limit, and the second coat cracked and bubbled. This wasn't for a keezer and was a much smaller project, but I had to sand all the way down and start again. That would really suck to have to do that on a freezer.

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Old 12-14-2013, 01:03 PM   #7
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I hate to suggest extra work, but you will need to have the freezer itself warmed up to have success, not just the air around it. Personally, I would move it to the house as is and finish the construction knowing that it will have to be moved back outside and disassembled next spring when the temperature and HUMIDITY are good for proper painting. A lot of extra work, but for me it would keep me from kicking myself every time I looked at something not exactly right.

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Old 12-16-2013, 01:38 AM   #8
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Thanks for all the tips, I've held off on this for now. However, it looks like a high temperature of 57 tomorrow. I brought the freezer inside the house and have it disassembled (lid removed, hinges removed, etc.) and have it all the important stuff taped off for painting. I figure it will be in the warm house all day, then tomorrow night I can bring it out to the garage, with space heaters running, and paint it. Assuming the freezer is at room-temperature from being inside the house night tonight and all day tomorrow, and it is still 50ish degrees outside when I get off work, I have my fingers crossed that this will work. Thoughts?

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Old 12-17-2013, 05:00 AM   #9
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It will be 100% fine at 57 degrees. The best advise is put on a bunch of light coats as opposed to one or two heavy coats. Spray paint is mostly solvent, and if you try to go to heavy it WILL sag and run. The lower the temp the more likely it will run/sag but at 57 you will be fine. Don't put it on too heavy. Make sure it takes at least three coats (I would go four or five light coats). Spray paints can usualy be recoated in 30-60 minutes and are dry to the touch within a few hours. If you force it to cover in one or two coats it will sag and take hours to dry. If you put on a bunch of light coats it will not sag and take a total of hours to dry (same time better results with more coats). I would also sand with VERY fine grit paper (400+) before the last coat. This will get rid of most small imperfections without damaging the paint. By no means is this critical but im picky as I paint for a living.

The substrate (metal on freezer) temp is more important than the ambient air temp. Look on the paint manufactures website or even the back of the can. You would be amazed how much info is on there as far as optimal temps, dry time, time to recoat, ect if you just look.

I am a painter and would use HVLP and (probably) automotive paint because I have the equipment. As a DIY you could get great results with cans of spray paint. Just be patient and dont force the paint to cover. I will probably forget to check this post tomorrow as im fairly intoxicated, but don't hesitate to PM me any questions if need be.

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Old 12-17-2013, 05:23 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stealthcruiser View Post
... fill up the kitchen sink with the hottest water your water heater will make,...and float your cans in there.
Shake them about every 10 minutes, and you'll feel the contents start to come up to the water temp.
You may have to change the water, depending on the number of cans you float.

DON'T try to warm them any other way!

I consider myself an expert with a spray bomb, (), and I do this to my cans no matter what the weather, as they spray and atomize better.
Great idea , thank you!
That makes a lot of sense. The less viscous paint will flow much better.

Safety: I could not find much info on the maximum safe temp for aerosol paint cans. This link states the pressure was 150psi at 130F, well within the required burst pressure of 270psi. Since 130F is much hotter than the usual hot water heater delivers, the cans should be safe.
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