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Old 12-12-2011, 09:59 PM   #11
captainkrypto
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Default What size kegs?

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The main problem with this conversion was that the refrigerator is too narrow to fit two ball-lock kegs (it will NOT fit a ball-lock and a pin-lock, let alone two pin-locks).
I was a bit confused by this. What type of kegs were you able to finally fit in there. The opening measures 17" without the rails. What is the diameter of the kegs that you used?
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Old 01-21-2012, 10:19 PM   #12
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So I just purchased the same fridge and am in midst of the conversion. I have a few findings and alternative methods to add to the mix.

The Door - I removed the door, then the plastic inside and rubber weather stripping via the screws. The plastic is thin enough that a new Razor in a sturdy utility knife will cut it like butter. I cut to the inside of the screw holes right when the plastic makes the 90 degree turn towards the inside of the fridge. Be careful with you free hand. I'm pretty good with a razor knife, but snagged my finger pretty good.

The Top - I wasn't sure of where the lines where located (and I wanted to reinforce the lid for the tower. I carefully removed the plastic lid. Go slow. It help to use a putty knife around the edged. I also used a block of wood and hammer to tap the side up. Then I SLOWLY peeled the top off. **Start in one of the front corners. A wedge piece of wood (like a door stop) helped a lot. I carved out small area from a 1/2 piece of wood to reinforce the lid for the tower.

Big observation I found. With the lid removed, on the underside there is a circle in the plastic and three preset "screw holes". It is dead center from side to side and about 3/4 back from the front of the fridge.

After digging out some of the foam insulation I found that the center of the circle is directly between two condenser lines. Translate this to the inside- You can see the Big bumps in the fridge and a few on the roof have a small bump in between them. The big bumps have the Lines the little one are in between them. So you can drill from the inside out using he small bump as a guide. The condenser lines are about 1/2" from the center of the small bump.

***So in short the big bumps on the inside of the fridge are the lines***Stay away from them****

Cutting the shelf rails - again you can use a good sharp utility knife.

Now I have pin locks and they do not reach as high as the cornies the OP has So I dd not have to cut the freezer section, only the bottom rail/shelf support for the freezer section.

Thanks to the OP - his worked greatly helped mine, and I hope my 2-cents can help someone else.

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Old 01-22-2012, 02:36 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by captainkrypto View Post
I was a bit confused by this. What type of kegs were you able to finally fit in there. The opening measures 17" without the rails. What is the diameter of the kegs that you used?
What I meant was that the fridge could not fit two ball-lock kegs without modification. I had to remove the shelf rails on the sides of the fridge in order to fit two ball-lock kegs. I've swapped out many kegs since I did this conversion, without problems. All of my kegs are standard ball-locks, with a diameter of just under 8.5".
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Old 01-22-2012, 02:42 AM   #14
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Thanks for the additions, WCrane. Are you able to fit two pin-locks in the fridge, or just one? I seem to recall I was unable to get one ball-lock and one pin-lock in at the same time.

Nice tip on the utility knife. Just last week I used a utility knife to make a cut-out for my Love temp controller I use on my side-by-side fridge fermentation chamber. I wish I had known how well they cut through that plastic when I was doing the kegerator. Using the angle grinder made a huge mess.

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Old 01-22-2012, 03:02 AM   #15
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I have to finish the cuts tomorrow but I think I should be able the squeeze them in. If I I have to ill cut into the compressor hump and touch things up with spray foam. I'll report back on my findings, headaches, screw ups and injuries.

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Old 01-22-2012, 03:39 AM   #16
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I was AWOL from this site for a few months towards the end of last year, so I missed some of the responses in this thread.

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Could you please explain or show photos on how you attached the copper to the top, near the faucets? I like this idea, and am going to entertain the idea sooner than later.
I took a single 5' piece of 1/2" OD copper tubing and cut it in half. I fed the two tubes through the holes I cut in the top of the fridge (shown in the last three pictures of the second post of this thread). I removed the quick disconnects from the beer lines and fed the lines through the tubes. Next I mounted the tower and re-connected the quick disconnects. The copper tubes themselves are not permanently mounted to anything. There is enough tension between the cramped space of the tower and the holes in the top of the fridge to hold them in to place. They can slide down in to the fridge if I'm switching out kegs or messing around with things. However, I just have to slide them back up in to the tower and all is well.

To be honest, I'm not sure the copper tubing helps much at all. I still get lots of foam on the first pour of most beers, until the lines cool off.

Let me know if any more clarification is needed. I'd just assume not take things apart at this point to take pictures, but I will if it would be helpful.

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Do you think a 6 gallon better bottle would fit in the fridge before modification?
I believe hpergolic PM'd me about this. Unfortunately I don't have my responses saved, and I don't recall if the better bottle actually fit. If you're reading this hypergolic, do you remember what my response was? I don't feel like taking my kegs out right now and testing it.
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Old 01-22-2012, 09:00 PM   #17
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Ok... didn't get much time to fit the pin-locks today...

I did manage to make a set of cardboard templates of the kegs to see how they would fit. It looks like I will need about 2.5-3" of space from the mouth of the fridge. The door, unaltered gives me about 7/8" and I may create a small indent in the door foam from an extra 1/2-3/4". I don't want to take too much out of the door.

I plan I will cut a divot in the left side of the fridge and another on the left end of the compressor hump. The insulation is thicker there and there is some room behind the ball in the rear to add some extra insulation while still allowing air circulation. I'll line each divot with silver tape and fill any gaps with foam to help hold the cold.

This way, I figure the left keg will sit in the indents and the right will be more forward.

I did manage to get my hole drilled to run two 12" section of 1/2" copper. Plan is that about 3" will hang into the fridge and the rest out the top, into the tower. I also drop a 3/4"x6"x6" piece of board into the top foam to help support the tower. I will secure it
with some adhesive, spray the cracks and gaps and add some silver tape.

I'm also thinking of making a cut to slid the thermo/light wires back. I think there is enough play that a simple cut to the back and down will allow me to slide them back to a new spot. I'll fill the old with foam and cover with tape.

Getting there....I'll report back after some progress is made.

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Old 01-31-2012, 12:40 PM   #18
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I have an update.. took awhile to get free time to work on it.

The Lid - After removing the lid and adding a wood block I reattached the lid using some liquid nails for foam board. It didn't works so well. So I used for small screws, one in each corner on the side of the fridge. Thru the lid lip and into the metal side. beware there isn't much room to work with.

Pipes - I did run two 12" pieces of 1/2" copper thru the lid. About 2-3" sit in the fridge the remainder is out of the lid ( about 6-7"). I used spray foam to build a column around the pipes, then trimmed it down, wrapped it in foil and silver tape. With the fridge running the pipes are cold and so is the foam.

For the Door- I had to shave a small amount of foam out of the left side of the door (hinge side) there was a slight indent already, I just made it a tad bit deeper. I covered the inside of the door with the silver duct tape.
the one issue I did find is that the fridge slopes towards the door. I place a small section of 1/4 pipe to level out the forward keg and help clear the weatherstripping on
the door. I also attached a small latch on the side of the door to hold the door shut.

Shelf Rails - Cut and Taped

Theremostat relocation - managed to make a cut from the hole where the wire are down to the next shelf rail (not exposed) the wires travel down then towards the back. I managed to free up enough of the wire to relocate the Thermo without cutting and splicing any wires.

Fitting the Kegs- I cut out a 6-7"wide section of the compressor hump and removed the foam all the way to the plastic board in the back. I did this on the left side (as if you where looking into the fridge). There is a much better void in the back of the fridge where the compressor is. I used some spray foam to build back up what I took out. I covered all exposed areas with the silver tape. This along with the small amount from the door gave me enough to fit in two Pinlocks.

Still have to find a home for the regulators and figure out a nice top.

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Old 01-31-2012, 01:15 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_M View Post
To be honest, I'm not sure the copper tubing helps much at all. I still get lots of foam on the first pour of most beers, until the lines cool off.
Just a little tip, just copper isnt going to insulate the lines, copper is actually a really good conductor, thats why its used for heat transfer applications (ICs, radiators, etc). Essentially if your lines are in contact with the copper you are creating a heat sink to suck away what cold you have from the fridge when its in the tower. So I would assume its not going to help much. To insulate the lines you want something less dense, in a perfect world you would put a vacuum between the lines and the outside air, but obviously thats not practical. So if you get some spray insulation, or some foam, something that has a lot of dead air space (heat cant travel through air very well) that would be a better solution. Another option and what Im considering doing when I set mine up is hook up a small computer fan to blow cold air into the tower, would need a bigger hole for the lines but might help. Hope this helps some
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Old 01-31-2012, 08:23 PM   #20
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I'm aware of the conductive properties of copper. The idea of the copper tubing is to chill the tower. This approach is supposed to make use of the conductive properties of copper to remove heat from the top (the tower) so that the first pour is cooler than it would be normally.

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