Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Wine Making Forum > Why arent fruit wines sold commercially (much)?!
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-11-2014, 05:42 PM   #1
jamesbsmith
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 77
Liked 10 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default Why arent fruit wines sold commercially (much)?!

I really don't understand why commercial wine (in the main) has to be made from grapes! I live in the UK (where we don't have many vineyards and much wine making), but I have been making rhubarb wine (often with other fruit / juices) added, and they are absolutely great! As we all know here, loads of other fruits / ingredients can make amazing wines which I would much rather drink than many grape wines! I don't understand why this hasn't been taken advantage of more commercially. In England (and all other colder climes) we should have "vineyards" full of rhubarb etc!

Are there any stories in the wine making world (like that of the home brewers "Brew Dog"), that perfected any great fruit wine recipes and make it big time?! I know that we don't have this hobby with the hope that we are going to commercialise our recipes and take over the world, as its the process of producing poor wines and then making wines you are really happy with and improving them which makes it all so worthwhile, but I am just puzzled why it doesn't appear that anything other than grape is taken advantage of!

__________________
jamesbsmith is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-11-2014, 07:53 PM   #2
jensmith
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 285
Liked 36 Times on 33 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesbsmith
I really don't understand why commercial wine (in the main) has to be made from grapes! I live in the UK (where we don't have many vineyards and much wine making), but I have been making rhubarb wine (often with other fruit / juices) added, and they are absolutely great! As we all know here, loads of other fruits / ingredients can make amazing wines which I would much rather drink than many grape wines! I don't understand why this hasn't been taken advantage of more commercially. In England (and all other colder climes) we should have "vineyards" full of rhubarb etc!

Are there any stories in the wine making world (like that of the home brewers "Brew Dog"), that perfected any great fruit wine recipes and make it big time?! I know that we don't have this hobby with the hope that we are going to commercialise our recipes and take over the world, as its the process of producing poor wines and then making wines you are really happy with and improving them which makes it all so worthwhile, but I am just puzzled why it doesn't appear that anything other than grape is taken advantage of!
I have several local wineries that make fruit wines. The closest makes about half fruit and half grape. Their fruit wines are fantastic! If you ever come to Maine, USA, stop in to Blacksmiths winery in Casco. Free taste testings daily:-)
Ditto to liking fruit wines over grape wines!!! Rubarb is a favorite here as well. Grape is the last wine I would chose to drink.
__________________
jensmith is offline
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-11-2014, 08:48 PM   #3
damdaman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 510
Liked 18 Times on 15 Posts

Default

I agree, but I think in general there may be an emerging market for fruit wines, and commercial wineries that are forward-looking enough to start making them available at reasonable prices might get in a trend at the ground level.

There are a couple places I know of near me that produce some sort of fruit wines and even brandies, but they're hard to find and fairly expensive. Definitely can't find them in the grocery store, although mead is becoming more available at some specialty grocery stores around me.

__________________
damdaman is offline
jamesbsmith Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-11-2014, 09:11 PM   #4
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 62,784
Liked 4915 Times on 3564 Posts
Likes Given: 990

Default

There are hundreds and hundreds of small to medium sized wineries in the US that make non-traditional fruit wines. Typically, I see cranberry wines in our area, but blueberry wines and peach wines are common as well. In Wisconsin especially (and I think Washington state), I see lots of cherry wines and apple wines. In Upstate New York, I've seen unusual grape wines like catawba grape wines.

I think US wineries produce quite a bit of fruit wines, and that there is a market for them. I am not familiar with fruit wines in other parts of the world, though.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Find me on facebook: Lorena Evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is online now
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2014, 10:44 AM   #5
WVMJ
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Karnage, WV
Posts: 1,122
Liked 107 Times on 101 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

Fruit wines are still looked on as less sophisticated than grape wines, in my part of the woods if you give someone a bottle of fruit wine they say I will give this to my wife, she loves fruit wines. I try to tell them this isnt strawberry hill but once a mindset is in place its too much work to overcome it. A lot of the small vineyards new us also make some kind of fruit wines. Our favorite one, Village Winery in Waterford VA, grows their own elderberries and even makes an elderberry juice with chocolate unfermented, talk about experimenting with fruit. I thought you English guys had hedgerows everywhere full of fruit trees and you can just walk down the road with a Tesco bag and pick your fill anytime you wanted? WVMJ

WVMJ is offline
jamesbsmith Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2014, 01:30 PM   #6
JonM
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
JonM's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Milwaukee
Posts: 4,551
Liked 836 Times on 577 Posts
Likes Given: 69

Default

Yep, you just have to find a region of the country that is known for a particular fruit, and I can pretty much guarantee that there are winemakers in that area using that fruit. For example, Door County, Wisconsin, is famous for cherries. You can find cherry wine all over the place up there. I betcha can find peach wine in Georgia, blueberry wine in New England, etc.

__________________
Who is this Rorschach guy? And why did he paint so many pictures of my parents fighting?
JonM is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2014, 01:54 PM   #7
gratus fermentatio
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Montana
Posts: 9,135
Liked 973 Times on 637 Posts
Likes Given: 2668

Default

Ya, thanks to Boone's Farm & Arbor Mist, fruit wine is generally thought to be inferior, "cheap" wine; mostly because those are the 1st (and often only) fruit wines people try. This is slowly starting to change, mostly due to small wineries turning out some tasty fruit wines, but there's still a long way to go.

We homebrewers usually make the best fruit wines as far as I'm concerned. I've tasted some pretty good fruit wines from small wineries & honestly, I've made wines that were as good, and a few that were BETTER than theirs.
If I can do it, so can you.
Regards, GF.

__________________
gratus fermentatio is offline
jamesbsmith Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2014, 03:32 PM   #8
bambiying
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 13
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

We have tons of farms with fruit trees in Bucks County, PA and most of the wineries around here do apple, strawberry, peach and other fruits. They do seem to be a little pricier than the concords and niagaras that most of the grape wines are from however. Here in PA there is a large population that really enjoy sweet grape wines and the wineries cater to that.

__________________
bambiying is offline
jamesbsmith Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-12-2014, 03:44 PM   #9
rawlus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: milford, ma
Posts: 429
Liked 21 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

IMHO only, because fruit wine sucks. Haha. Typically it's too sweet and single note. I've tried tons of fruit wines from many different orchards and other "wineries", just not impressed by the fermented juice.

__________________
rawlus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-13-2014, 01:38 AM   #10
Bluespark
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 417
Liked 26 Times on 20 Posts

Default

Around here it's growing greatly in popularity. We have a fantastic local winery that makes exclusively grape free wines. The cherry is fabulous, semi sweet, but they also make a dry strawberry rue barb. I way prefer fruit wines to grape

__________________
Bluespark is offline
jamesbsmith Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
making fruit wines winewitted Wine Making Forum 8 05-03-2013 01:19 AM
MLF in Fruit Wines eastcoastwino Wine Making Forum 3 03-21-2013 09:09 PM
pH for fruit wines? DougBrown Wine Making Forum 2 08-01-2012 02:17 AM
Where to start with fruit wines Blindlight Wine Making Forum 2 07-19-2011 11:49 AM
fruit wines: When should I go to secondary??/ mikesalvo Wine Making Forum 3 05-12-2009 01:19 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS