Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Wine Making Forum > very basic question: fermenting supplies

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-11-2011, 05:08 PM   #1
sashurlow
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: West Rutland, Vermont
Posts: 333
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts

Default very basic question: fermenting supplies

My plan is to make some plum wine this fall when my plum tree drops lots of plums (anyone local to Vermont is free to harvest some in the fall).
I currently brew cider and mostly use carboys.
What fermenting supplies do I need. I wanted to do gallon batches. Do I need a bucket for a primary or is a gallon jug fine for a primary and secondary?
Thanks,
scott
On a side note, I've heard of plum wine, hence my future attempt. Has anyone tried plum cider???

__________________
sashurlow is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-11-2011, 07:01 PM   #2
Nateo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Bennett Springs, MO
Posts: 2,055
Liked 36 Times on 29 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

Here's my process for fruit wine:
Add yeast to jug. Let sit for 6-8 weeks. Bottle.

I just use stoppers and airlocks for the jugs. Don't remember the size off the top of my head, but there are at least two different sized openings for gallon jugs.

Just divide up the yeast between the different 1 gal jugs, keeping in mind pitching rates. The yeast manufacturer has recommendations on that.

There's really no reason to use a secondary fermenter. That's a concept that's carried over from lager fermentation.

__________________

To paraphrase Dr. England - "Off-flavors smooth with time. So do mountains. Brew it right from the start!"

My blogsite: http://nateobrew.blogspot.com/

Nateo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-11-2011, 07:08 PM   #3
Clann
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Edmonton Ky
Posts: 1,330
Liked 15 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 51

Default

If you are doing 1 gal batches, lowes has a 2 gal bucket and lid for about 5 $

I use it on my 1 gal batches with fruit.

__________________
Clann is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-11-2011, 11:47 PM   #4
oldmate
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 869
Liked 16 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nateo View Post
There's really no reason to use a secondary fermenter. That's a concept that's carried over from lager fermentation.
It's not essential, but stops a lot of unsightly sediment dropping out in the bottles.
__________________
Primary: Cherry Melomel

Secondary:

Bottled: JAOM, Amber Ale
oldmate is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-12-2011, 04:19 AM   #5
Winepig
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 35
Default

I fool around with a lot of gallon batches. My favorite primaries are a large stainless steel mixing bowl that my wife uses in the kitchen and a big stainless cooking pot.

I also have an 8 gallon stainless "lobster pot" I picked up at a garage sale. It's really a high end turkey deep fryer but it's stainless and only cost me a couple of bucks.

I'm a tight a$$, I refuse to spend money on a plastic bucket. Around here, it would end up in the hog barn within a week of being empty anyhow.

Good luck,

Tim

__________________
Winepig is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-12-2011, 04:11 PM   #6
smyrnaquince
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Concord, MA
Posts: 569
Liked 18 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clann View Post
If you are doing 1 gal batches, lowes has a 2 gal bucket and lid for about 5 $

I use it on my 1 gal batches with fruit.
I'm not sure that these are rated as being food grade.

I've picked up 2-gallon buckets from a local bakery. They get frosting or filling in them.
__________________
smyrnaquince is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-13-2011, 11:24 AM   #7
Clann
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Edmonton Ky
Posts: 1,330
Liked 15 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 51

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by smyrnaquince View Post
I'm not sure that these are rated as being food grade.

I've picked up 2-gallon buckets from a local bakery. They get frosting or filling in them.
They are #2 HDPE
__________________
Clann is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-13-2011, 05:02 PM   #8
smyrnaquince
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Concord, MA
Posts: 569
Liked 18 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clann View Post
They are #2 HDPE
That doesn't mean that they are food grade. Food grade is related to the purity of the plastic as well as what it is made of (HDPE, in this case). I've seen claims that some bucket manufacturers make all their buckets food grade because it is easier than having two production lines, but I'd get the company's name off the bottom of the bucket first and call them to be sure.
__________________
smyrnaquince is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-13-2011, 05:10 PM   #9
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,585
Liked 4342 Times on 3157 Posts
Likes Given: 845

Default

Plum wine drops a lot of lees for quite a while. You can start fermentation in a food grade bucket, but after that you need a small one-gallon carboy with a #6 stopper and airlock. You'll need some siphoning tubing, some campden tablets, and I like to use pectic enzyme for fruit wines. Two jugs is ideal, so you can move the wine ("rack") to the other jug when needed.

Glass jugs are pretty cheap, but if you can tolerate Carlo Rossi wine, it comes in 4L bottles that are perfect for carboys! The narrow headspace is necessary after the fermentation slows down, by about day 10. You can't really make good wine without having a carboy with a narrow headspace.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Apfelwein fermenting question BMWMK2 Wine Making Forum 2 10-18-2010 10:09 PM
fermenting chip82 Wine Making Forum 4 03-25-2010 01:05 AM
Wine Kits -- beyond the basic instructions... tom777 Wine Making Forum 10 02-23-2010 05:19 AM
Basic Winemaking Information Here! bigkevj Wine Making Forum 0 11-27-2007 07:54 PM
Wine Making Supplies dhaas66 Wine Making Forum 3 06-05-2007 12:03 PM