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Old 08-06-2013, 01:21 AM   #1
Arpolis
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Default Marshmallow wine! After nearly a year of aging!

Haha

A while back someone posted about doing rediculous wines and I decided on a couple but the most promising was the 1 liter marshmallow wine I made. I took nearly no notes so most of this is from memory. I took a whole bag of marshmallows and at first tried to boil some water and melt them in it. That was impossible! They just proofed up and were extra fluffy. After like an hour they never melted into the water. I then started throwing ladles full in the blender. After a good blitzing and a little hot water I got it all dissolved. I think the gravity was about 1.100. I threw in a pinch of yeast nutrient and pitched some lalvin 1116 yeast and away it went. I have been too scared to touch it for nearly a year. I gave it a serious try yesterday...

Oh man!!! ...

It was like you mixed rubbing alcohol, cheap tequila and bud light together!


Gaaaaahhhhh!

It was not enough to make me spit it out which some bad experents in the past have like my cucumber mead but this stuff was not great. Lets wait another year and see what it is like lol.



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Old 08-06-2013, 01:48 AM   #2
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Glad someone is pushing the limits and also glad it's not me! LOL,

Like your style though and keep it up!

Best,



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Old 08-06-2013, 04:22 AM   #3
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Is it bad that even though this thread was written to say "this tastes bad" but I now want to try it?

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Old 08-06-2013, 04:26 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Tom128 View Post
Is it bad that even though this thread was written to say "this tastes bad" but I now want to try it?
you're sick, dude. i wonder if using tiny marshmallows instead of regular marshmallows would make a difference in ease of use...
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Old 08-06-2013, 11:21 AM   #5
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This is interesting, did you happen to use the ones made with eggwhites or where they of the gelatin variety? Did you roast them before you added them to the blender?

You might want to do a little research on Marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) flower and root. I pulled up the wikipedia site, appearently the homeade french varieties called for rose water. It might be worth experimenting with the raw ingredients sans egg white. That is provided that Marshmallow is a relatively safe plant. I know rose wine can be pretty freakin good, so it might be worth a shot.

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Old 08-06-2013, 02:02 PM   #6
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I could be way off base here, but marshmallows are made from sugar and gelatin.

So, basically I think what you made was a similar derivative of what the Finns or sweeds make? I think it's called killedjue. (I know it sounds like you are saying "Killed you") I would look it up, but gotta run. Anyway, to the best of my memory, it's primarily made by young adults for the alcohol content. Something to do with laws and adding anything to it, I can't remember now.

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Old 08-06-2013, 03:53 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Budvar View Post
This is interesting, did you happen to use the ones made with eggwhites or where they of the gelatin variety? Did you roast them before you added them to the blender?

You might want to do a little research on Marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) flower and root. I pulled up the wikipedia site, appearently the homeade french varieties called for rose water. It might be worth experimenting with the raw ingredients sans egg white. That is provided that Marshmallow is a relatively safe plant. I know rose wine can be pretty freakin good, so it might be worth a shot.
The marshmallows where generic store brand made with gelatin. The marshmallows were boils in water for an hour and then the water and marshmallows went into the blender to liquefy.

I think the marshmallow flavors can be re-produced and probably would be best in a mead made with some meadowfoam honey. But this was just to see what normal marshmallows would produce out of curiosity.
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Old 08-06-2013, 06:22 PM   #8
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When I was driving, I was thinking of this thread. Budvar mentioned roasting them, I think that would be awesome!

Ok; since we are stretching our imaginations, take it just a touch further. Roast the mallows. And add chocolate syrup to the secondary. If it was a mead, I seriously think that a s'more flavor could be attained.

I really like the idea with using the raw original ingredients. But for simplicity, let's say you do this:

Ingredients:

Firewood
Bag of 'mallows
Liquid chocolate syrup
Honey

Roast all the mallows as follows:Roast, as the mallow gets a nice roasted coating on it, pull off the roasted coating (toss in primary). (Just like if your mallow catches fire and you don't like the burnt taste, you take the coating off like a used condom. Sorry for the association, but it's so iconic.) Continue to roast the mallow again, toasting the inside of the original mallow. This ensures we are going to maximize on that roasted flavor.

Rinse and repeat, until all the marshmallows are in primary.

Once all the mallows are roasted add water and honey, making mead. Rack onto chocolate syrup in secondary. Maybe even add oak.

Bottle, age, serve with Teddy Grahams.

Pairs well with Teddy Grahms, Grahm Crackers, camping, campfires and gravel-pit parties.

I have to admit; I have done a complete 180* turn on this. At first I was thinking "Ok, no surprize, it tastes like snot." Now: Whoa! "s'more mead please!"

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Old 08-06-2013, 06:34 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StoneArcher View Post
When I was driving, I was thinking of this thread. Budvar mentioned roasting them, I think that would be awesome!

Ok; since we are stretching our imaginations, take it just a touch further. Roast the mallows. And add chocolate syrup to the secondary. If it was a mead, I seriously think that a s'more flavor could be attained.

I really like the idea with using the raw original ingredients. But for simplicity, let's say you do this:

Ingredients:

Firewood
Bag of 'mallows
Liquid chocolate syrup
Honey

Roast all the mallows as follows:Roast, as the mallow gets a nice roasted coating on it, pull off the roasted coating (toss in primary). (Just like if your mallow catches fire and you don't like the burnt taste, you take the coating off like a used condom. Sorry for the association, but it's so iconic.) Continue to roast the mallow again, toasting the inside of the original mallow. This ensures we are going to maximize on that roasted flavor.

Rinse and repeat, until all the marshmallows are in primary.

Once all the mallows are roasted add water and honey, making mead. Rack onto chocolate syrup in secondary. Maybe even add oak.

Bottle, age, serve with Teddy Grahams.

Pairs well with Teddy Grahms, Grahm Crackers, camping, campfires and gravel-pit parties.

I have to admit; I have done a complete 180* turn on this. At first I was thinking "Ok, no surprize, it tastes like snot." Now: Whoa! "s'more mead please!"
Been done with a beer...

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Old 08-06-2013, 07:53 PM   #10
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As a Michigan guy, Shorts has a place in my heart. My buddies bring up Shorts in growlers when they come up from TC. They push the flavors with their beers! Strawberry Short's Cake, PB&J Ale, etc.. I had no idea they did a S'more Stout though!

Sometimes beers are able to hold flavors a bit easier to the original ingredient. Not always, but I have found that's the case some of the time. I was thinking adding graham crumbs in the recipe, but figured that the siting in yeast for months would turn it to yeasty crud. It's worth a try though!

A mead is what I was referring to. A lot of things have been done with beers that have not yet been done or may be thought impossible to do with a wine or mead. For whatever reason the beer world lends itself nicer to prototyping. Perhaps it's the relatively quick turn around time compared to aging for years as in wines and meads. Also, the wine industry seems to be one of the most traditional industries ever, unwilling to change. IMHO, I like the deep tradition of wine. I like full corks, thick glass, and aging to perfection. Though novelty wines such as the one being discussed is a neat sideline as well.



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