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Old 05-30-2010, 06:34 AM   #1
Satori
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Default Kilju (Sugar Wine)

I've been trying to make sugar-wine (pure rocket fuel) to ferment to dry. So far it hasn't happened. I must have tried 4 batches so far, and to date, no joy.

I've been using 3 lbs. sugar with 1 tsp nutrient and 1/2 tsp energiser for a 1 US gal batch.

It does primary fine with EC-1118 but it does not seem to finish dry. Believe it or not 3 lbs works out to about 16% AP, which is two points below where it should finish at.

Can anybody recommend another yeast to try, or should I just lower the amount of sugar?

Thanks!

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Old 05-30-2010, 08:02 AM   #2
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The yeast are probably nutrient starved, plain sugar just has no nutrients for the yeast to reproduce and grow.

You'll probably need to do a staggered nutrient addition over the first week, make sure your yeast nutrient contains more than just DAP too, you'll need amino acids, b-vitamins maybe yeast hulls.

I'd also check the PH, ec-1118 has a pretty wide tolerance, but I have no idea what range plain sugar might be.

What was your FG? 3lbs per gallon is over 17% abv, that's close to ec-1118s limit.

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Old 06-29-2010, 09:13 PM   #3
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I gave a good deal of thought to your post and decided to try something a little different.

Add 1 oz of raisins to the must. WOW! What a difference!

I read somewhere that you can add up to 1lbs. per gallon without adding flavor.

Once I saw how well this works with Kilju, I just started my first Mead and it's fermenting away like crazy!

Now I just hope I have the patience to see it finish before I drink it all .

Thanks for your post. It really made me think.

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Old 06-30-2010, 04:18 AM   #4
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You should use turbo yeast.

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Old 06-30-2010, 01:29 PM   #5
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Turbo yeast is a bad idea. Yes, it is fast and has a high tolerance, but you get higher alcohols that are nasty and in some cases poisonous.

It can be useful for drying out a high ABV batch, but never use it for the primary fermentation.

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Old 07-01-2010, 08:32 PM   #6
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Interesting I did not know that.. I guess that's why it is used mainly for the production of wash in distillation. So is it even legal to purchase?

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Old 07-05-2010, 05:03 AM   #7
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Yeah, turbo yeast expels a higher percentage of fusal alcohols. It also doesn't like to settle out, requiring filtering. That's too much work.

Anyway, I've recently found that I've been using a deficient yeast nutrient. It's this brown powder I got at my local HBS and it would settle out of the must. I just got this new stuff that's almost clear and it dissolves completely into the must.

The raisins help, but it's no substitute for good nutrient.

P.S. yes the yeast is legal to buy and sell in the US. You are able to buy and own distillation equipment too, but it's still illegal to use it to distill spirits. So don't do it.

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Old 11-14-2010, 08:33 PM   #8
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You should only use Turbo yeast if you plan to distill after fermentation and I recommend you ferment with brown sugar(unrefined cane sugar) because after distillation you get a tasty rum!

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Old 11-14-2010, 10:26 PM   #9
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I have been using Turbo yeast in 12 to 15 (6 gal each) batches over the last year or so and never had a problem. There are certain techniques that have to be adopted to make the most out of it and reduce the VOCs to very little if at all..

1) Use an open fermenter and stir at least once a day during fermentation to help remove any VOC's.
2) Do not ferment in wood barrels. The wood can break down into the wine and increase VOC's
3) Do not use pectic enzymes.

Here are a couple of quotes as to why I won't use the enzymes.

Quote:
The methanol comes from the pectin, which mainly composed of methyl esters of galactose. When pectin breaks down, by enzymes introduced by microorganisms, or deliberately introduced, the methyl esters combine with water to produce methanol, so the aim should be to leave the pectin well alone if you can.
Quote:
The Long Ashton Research Station did some studies that showed that ciders and apple juices clarified with pectic enzymes are higher in methanol due to the demethylation of juice pectins. The methanol content varied from 10 to 400 ppm in the test samples.
None of my batches came out with high methanol levels and I drink it young. I have bought store whiskey that has a strong smell similar to acetone or fingernail polish remover before.
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