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Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Wine Making Forum > How soon can you add Sparkalloid?
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Old 09-14-2011, 04:37 AM   #1
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Default How soon can you add Sparkalloid?

I'm making a 15 gallon batch of strawberry wine. I racked it once already. After about a month I added Sparkalloid to it. It is still fermenting. The wine is clearing. How soon can or should you add Sparkalloid? The picture was taking right after the initial racking.

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Old 09-14-2011, 04:54 AM   #2
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That is a sweet fermenter !

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Old 09-14-2011, 05:17 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeybeer View Post
That is a sweet fermenter !
Was going to post the same thing. That's a really, really nice carboy.
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Old 09-14-2011, 05:19 AM   #4
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It's a demijohn

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Old 09-14-2011, 08:02 AM   #5
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carboy#Brewing

"In brewing, a carboy is also known as a demijohn.

"Demijohn" is an old word that formerly referred to any glass vessel with a large body and small neck, enclosed in wickerwork. According to The Oxford English Dictionary the word comes from the French dame-jeanne, literally "Lady Jane", as a popular appellation. This is in accordance with the historical evidence at present known, since the word occurred initially in France in the 17th century, and no earlier trace of it has been found elsewhere."
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Old 09-14-2011, 08:15 AM   #6
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Sigh...

From the exact same article you just linked to:

"The term carboy itself usually refers to a 19 L carboy, unless otherwise noted. A 4.5 litre carboy is usually called a jug. A 57 L carboy is usually called a demijohn."

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Old 09-14-2011, 08:42 AM   #7
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Usually. The terms are interchangable and simply mean "Large [glass] vessel with a thin neck"

They also have different exact meanings in different places. For example, in Swedish, damejeanne refers to any large glass jug.

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Old 09-14-2011, 02:53 PM   #8
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Thanks for the info on carboys and demijohns. For the record, the brew shop I bought it from referred to it as a demijohn. Can anyone help me on the Sparkalloid issue?

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Old 09-14-2011, 03:01 PM   #9
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Sparkalloid turned this into that in three days.

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Old 09-15-2011, 12:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubba
Usually. The terms are interchangable and simply mean "Large [glass] vessel with a thin neck"

They also have different exact meanings in different places. For example, in Swedish, damejeanne refers to any large glass jug.
Okay... you seem to have gotten the wrong idea. I wasn't trying to correct your use of the word carboy. I was simply trying to help you and joeybeer out.

Your mutual fascination with the vessel (both quotes provided below, unedited and in full), indicated that neither of you were very familiar with 15gal/57L demijohns, since much like carboys, they're pretty much all identical, and if you've seen one, you've seen them all. So I figured one or both of you guys might appreciate a bit more info on them.

And because HBT posters and even homebrew stores virtually always refer to these particular vessels as demijohns, (to differentiate them from the smaller/cylindrical "carboys", as your Wikipedia link pointed out), I specifically called it a demijohn as well, because it is much more useful to anybody interested in more information on them or possibly even buying one.

So yeah... I really wasn't being pedantic in the least, and I apologize for apparently not being clear enough. My ONLY intention was to provide a helpful starting point for you guys, considering the posts you made (quoted below).

Quote:
Originally Posted by You both
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeybeer
That is a sweet fermenter !
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubba

Was going to post the same thing. That's a really, really nice carboy.
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