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Old 01-12-2014, 12:14 AM   #11
joey210
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Originally Posted by jensmith View Post
Campden (sulfa) will not stop yeast. Especially wine yeast. Unless you add so much it is undrinkable. Sorbate should keep yeast from multiplying, preventing new fermantaion. Used together they usualy keep a clear wine still. I have had fermentaion start up with both added per instructions! Make super sure your wine is compleatly clear and as much of the yeast is gone as possible. Lots of aging is best.
To prevent the mouth drying effect do not oak or add lots of tannin. Some grapes contain lots of the mouth drying tannins. Don't use those grapes:-) Sweetning will just make them more drinkable, but will not compleatly rid the wine of the mouth drying effect.

What wine are you planning on making, or want to fix?
Hiya Jensmith:-) again thanx so much, its a real joy to get H.brew advice to keep us begininers going.. I once had the most beautiful bottle of wine whislt traveling in Rome. It was called Cannonau Di Sardegna. I loved it so much I kept the label. ( this was over ten yrs ago) .. I'm not sure if youv heard of it but that is just the flavour I'm aiming for. ( Sorry my understanding of wine isnt the best..Cheers:-)
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Old 01-12-2014, 02:58 AM   #12
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Cannonau Di Sardegna is from Sardinia. Cannonau is the Italian name for the Grenache grape, used in rose from France and super popular in Spain as garnacha. If you're looking to make a wine that tastes like cannonau, it would be best to start with Grenache... You can likely get grapes from Spain to do so through some good distributors. I would also recommend doing much much more research and reading, back sweetening red wine from grapes is not a technique I would recommend unless you are seeking a dessert wine.... It's possible you tried a version if cannonau called licoroso (I think that's the name) that is a fortified version if the wine, has added alcohol and sugar and is sort of like a port in that sense.... It's sweeter and usually around 20% ABV...

But I would concentrate on research, yeast selection, brix, ph, acidity, skin contact and maceration, nutrients, temperature, racking and aging... You sort of need to understand these to really control the outcome for your wine, unless you are working with kits.

Yeast selection alone can have a great deal of influence on the outcome.

I suspect you are not seeking sweetness but a fruit forward character. Most red wines are dry, but they are not always tannic or oaky, they can be much more fresh tasting and perhaps that is what you are seeking.

A similar light red wine grape to Grenache is Gamay... The grape used in Beaujolais nouveau... I would pick up a bottle of that for under $10 to try and see if that is the sort of taste you're seeking.

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Old 01-12-2014, 08:24 AM   #13
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Rawlus just gave some excellent advice.

And I learned something from it that I did not know about Italian wines! :-)

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Old 01-12-2014, 04:28 PM   #14
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Cannonau Di Sardegna is from Sardinia. Cannonau is the Italian name for the Grenache grape, used in rose from France and super popular in Spain as garnacha. If you're looking to make a wine that tastes like cannonau, it would be best to start with Grenache... You can likely get grapes from Spain to do so through some good distributors. I would also recommend doing much much more research and reading, back sweetening red wine from grapes is not a technique I would recommend unless you are seeking a dessert wine.... It's possible you tried a version if cannonau called licoroso (I think that's the name) that is a fortified version if the wine, has added alcohol and sugar and is sort of like a port in that sense.... It's sweeter and usually around 20% ABV...

But I would concentrate on research, yeast selection, brix, ph, acidity, skin contact and maceration, nutrients, temperature, racking and aging... You sort of need to understand these to really control the outcome for your wine, unless you are working with kits.

Yeast selection alone can have a great deal of influence on the outcome.

I suspect you are not seeking sweetness but a fruit forward character. Most red wines are dry, but they are not always tannic or oaky, they can be much more fresh tasting and perhaps that is what you are seeking.

A similar light red wine grape to Grenache is Gamay... The grape used in Beaujolais nouveau... I would pick up a bottle of that for a under $10 to try and see if that is the sort of taste you're seeking.
.
What a great post:-) thanks alot rawlus.. I will follow your advice. With hours of research put in over this Christmas period, its great to have direct questions answered by ppl in the know:-) the net can be quite vague without sites such as this one.. would you have a yeast to recommend to make a wine close to the one mentioned? I find yeast is the platform for which direction one wants to take, but again iam new to the H.brew world:-) Cheers guys
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Old 01-12-2014, 05:37 PM   #15
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.
What a great post:-) thanks alot rawlus.. I will follow your advice. With hours of research put in over this Christmas period, its great to have direct questions answered by ppl in the know:-) the net can be quite vague without sites such as this one.. would you have a yeast to recommend to make a wine close to the one mentioned? I find yeast is the platform for which direction one wants to take, but again iam new to the H.brew world:-) Cheers guys
Lots of yeast possibilities, suggest you check out the following link from lallemand...
http://www.lallemandwine.us/cellar/grenache.php
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Old 01-12-2014, 05:44 PM   #16
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Maybe start with researching lalvin icv-d264
Study up on pitch rates, yeast nutrition, managing SO2 production, temperature and maceration, etc. you will want to keep daily detailed notes during fermentation....

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Old 01-12-2014, 09:39 PM   #17
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Maybe start with researching lalvin icv-d264
Study up on pitch rates, yeast nutrition, managing SO2 production, temperature and maceration, etc. you will want to keep daily detailed notes during fermentation....
Again, what a grand person u are Rawlus. Iam reading your link at the moment,. This is just the info I need to make my first step into the real science of Wine making. .... I must of caught the H.brew Bug, or as my friend says, the HBB:-) no doubt ill have some more question soon, if that's cool?....cheers buddy:-)
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Old 01-12-2014, 10:06 PM   #18
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Lots of yeast possibilities, suggest you check out the following link from lallemand...
http://www.lallemandwine.us/cellar/grenache.php
Ps.. I thought you may like to know that whilst I'm researching to get more understanding, iam in the process of making a simple Blackberry wine. Anyone starting out, who isn't sure about all the extra ingredients needed for H.brew wine should try this simple Blackberry wine recipe. Just type blackberry wine recipe into google and loads will come up.( sorry I don't have a link ).. :-)
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Old 01-14-2014, 05:28 PM   #19
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Default back sweetening

I put sorbate in when FG is .0990 and back sweeten with cane sugar to taste. I have a buddy who adds sorbate before yeast is done FG 1.020 or so to leave some of the original sugar behind. The later results in a lower ABV though. I am going to try different sweeteners this time. Maybe pineapple juice.

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