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Old 01-09-2014, 04:22 AM   #1
joey210
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Default How to Back Sweeten Wine

Hi, could somebody tell me how we create a sweetness to H.brew red wine, after secondary fermentation..? It seems no matter how long you leave the red wine to ferment, there is a dry taste.. I'm looking for a sweet full bodied flavour... is it possible to freeze it after secondary, return the wine to room temp once frozen and then siphon back into a demijohn with a hell load of sugar?... does yeast completly die from being frozen, or will it start up again?... iam trying not to use any extra chemicals and keep the wine as clean as possible... cheers all:-)

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Old 01-09-2014, 05:09 AM   #2
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The only way you guys are gonna get a sweet wine by the methods discussed so far, is to put in enough sugar to get your alcohol levels up to 20% and the yeast will die. This will produce a very "hot" alcohol flavor that will take a long time to mellow out. You need to add sorbates and sulfites to kill the yeast and then backsweeten.

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Old 01-10-2014, 11:39 AM   #3
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Concentrating on just the sweetness aspect, the best method for adding more sweetness is the ones already described using sorbate and sulfites. Freezing of the yeast will achieve 99 percent kill ratio however, fermentation will resume if you add more fermentables.

A concentration of the flavor can be achieved through a concentration of the product either from freezing or by adding a concentrate that you purchased and do not dilute.

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Old 01-10-2014, 10:00 PM   #4
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Thanx for the feedback:-) so I guess I'll have to use some form of sulphur to kill the yeast.. its a shame I was looking to make as free from chemical red wine as possible... I may try and leave secondary fermentation on my latest batch for a month or so and rack it a few more times, let the yeast almost die on its own.. after researching until sometimes 6am for the past month, it seems to me H.brew wine can have a lot of flavour if you have time on your hands. If one can sit and take the time to let the wine mature we can reach something close to what were loking for....this brings me to my next question... can somebody please list SG info. As I start to improve I want to get more into the Science of Wine making.. so again with research I have found there is other ways to make a full bodied sweet wine ...I can use a hydrometer to test gravity. This will tell me the SG( starting gravity ) of the sugar content. SG will tell me if I'm on the right track to getting a full bodied,etc wine. Ok at this point I need help, if there is any of you wine Scientist out there please tell me in detail the next steps from here... a list of the different types of wine ( full bodied, dry, sweet, etc ) and the gravity readings needed to keep the wine on the right track for the wine your after.. pheeew, my fingers!!!:-) hope that all makes sense.... cheers:-)

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Old 01-10-2014, 11:14 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joey210
Thanx for the feedback:-) so I guess I'll have to use some form of sulphur to kill the yeast.. its a shame I was looking to make as free from chemical red wine as possible... I may try and leave secondary fermentation on my latest batch for a month or so and rack it a few more times, let the yeast almost die on its own.. after researching until sometimes 6am for the past month, it seems to me H.brew wine can have a lot of flavour if you have time on your hands. If one can sit and take the time to let the wine mature we can reach something close to what were loking for....this brings me to my next question... can somebody please list SG info. As I start to improve I want to get more into the Science of Wine making.. so again with research I have found there is other ways to make a full bodied sweet wine ...I can use a hydrometer to test gravity. This will tell me the SG( starting gravity ) of the sugar content. SG will tell me if I'm on the right track to getting a full bodied,etc wine. Ok at this point I need help, if there is any of you wine Scientist out there please tell me in detail the next steps from here... a list of the different types of wine ( full bodied, dry, sweet, etc ) and the gravity readings needed to keep the wine on the right track for the wine your after.. pheeew, my fingers!!!:-) hope that all makes sense.... cheers:-)
Full boddied and sweet are two seperate things. Any wine can be made sweet. Full boddied I assume refures to a wine that is rich in flavor and complexity, with a thick mouthfeel. Those things take quality and quantity of fruits.
Sg just gives you abv of the wine if it goes dry. It has very little to do with full bodied wines. And unless you take your yeast to maximun tolerance, starting sg has very little to do with sweet wines.
I can't help with science type stuff. I just make tasty wine:-).
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Old 01-11-2014, 04:42 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by jensmith View Post
Full boddied and sweet are two seperate things. Any wine can be made sweet. Full boddied I assume refures to a wine that is rich in flavor and complexity, with a thick mouthfeel. Those things take quality and quantity of fruits.
Sg just gives you abv of the wine if it goes dry. It has very little to do with full bodied wines. And unless you take your yeast to maximun tolerance, starting sg has very little to do with sweet wines.
I can't help with science type stuff. I just make tasty wine:-).
Big thanku for the feedback.. as you can tell im new to the H.brew world.. can I please ask how I stay way clear of ending up with a dry red wine? Can't stand dry wines. That's just my taste though. What ever the other end of the spectrum is, in reguards to dry wine, that's the end I'm aiming for...:-) cheers
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Old 01-11-2014, 09:41 AM   #7
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"Full bodied" wine can mean both flavor and the actual final gravity of the wine. One of the by-products of the fermentation process is glycerin which contributes greatly to the sense of "fullness". A higher abv wine will have more than a lower one.

Lower oak levels can also increase flavor, but the trade off is a lower level of tannins.

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Old 01-11-2014, 01:49 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joey210

Big thanku for the feedback.. as you can tell im new to the H.brew world.. can I please ask how I stay way clear of ending up with a dry red wine? Can't stand dry wines. That's just my taste though. What ever the other end of the spectrum is, in reguards to dry wine, that's the end I'm aiming for...:-) cheers
By dry wines do you refure to the pucker and dry out your mouth wines? Those often have lots of tannin and/or oak in them. I only make fruit wines or wild grape wines. There are wine grapes you want to avoid if you do not want a dry mouth. Maybe someone who knows their grapes will chime in.
Any wine can be made sweet. Ferment to dry, sg under .995. Add sorbate and sulfa to stop yeast growth. Sweeten to taste. Check the sticky notes. There may be one on backsweetning.
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Old 01-11-2014, 05:45 PM   #9
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By dry wines do you refure to the pucker and dry out your mouth wines? Those often have lots of tannin and/or oak in them. I only make fruit wines or wild grape wines. There are wine grapes you want to avoid if you do not want a dry mouth. Maybe someone who knows their grapes will chime in.
Any wine can be made sweet. Ferment to dry, sg under .995. Add sorbate and sulfa to stop yeast growth. Sweeten to taste. Check the sticky notes. There may be one on backsweetning.
Thanks Jensmith. You got it!!... Those dry wines sometimes make me feel like i have an ashtray in my mouth. Could you tell me if adding a Campden tablet( 1 tablet for a gallon) would also halt the yeast? .. I read online that your meant to combine a campden with some other sulphate . But would just a campden work quite well on its own to halt the yeast?
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Old 01-11-2014, 06:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joey210

Thanks Jensmith. You got it!!... Those dry wines sometimes make me feel like i have an ashtray in my mouth. Could you tell me if adding a Campden tablet( 1 tablet for a gallon) would also halt the yeast? .. I read online that your meant to combine a campden with some other sulphate . But would just a campden work quite well on its own to halt the yeast?
Campden (sulfa) will not stop yeast. Especially wine yeast. Unless you add so much it is undrinkable. Sorbate should keep yeast from multiplying, preventing new fermantaion. Used together they usualy keep a clear wine still. I have had fermentaion start up with both added per instructions! Make super sure your wine is compleatly clear and as much of the yeast is gone as possible. Lots of aging is best.
To prevent the mouth drying effect do not oak or add lots of tannin. Some grapes contain lots of the mouth drying tannins. Don't use those grapes:-) Sweetning will just make them more drinkable, but will not compleatly rid the wine of the mouth drying effect.

What wine are you planning on making, or want to fix?
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