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Old 09-23-2009, 02:50 AM   #11
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I'd bet that once this finishes clearing, if you'll rack it carefully to another carboy and leave it be a while, you'll be amazed at the difference in taste even in a few weeks. Unless you have something growing in there that seems to be eyeing one of your cats, don't be too quick to throw out a batch. You'd be amazed how often a batch can be saved, even if it's not the best it could be. Bread yeast is optimized for baking, not winemaking, but it is yeast after all, and yeast + fruit + time = wine.

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Old 09-23-2009, 03:09 AM   #12
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I'd bet that once this finishes clearing, if you'll rack it carefully to another carboy and leave it be a while, you'll be amazed at the difference in taste even in a few weeks. Unless you have something growing in there that seems to be eyeing one of your cats, don't be too quick to throw out a batch. You'd be amazed how often a batch can be saved, even if it's not the best it could be. Bread yeast is optimized for baking, not winemaking, but it is yeast after all, and yeast + fruit + time = wine.
I have to confess that I HAD to see if dropping the sediment would make a difference so I removed the airlock and dropped a SANITIZED eye dropper in the top nd pulled out a small sample...it tastes totally different ( not GREAT as it is WAY more dry than I like) but something that I WOULD drink already. THANK YOU GUYS VERY VERY MUCH! Now can someone tell me how to "undry" this a bit? I am thinking of leaving one gallon as a pretty dry wine and sweetening the other a bit. Here is what I PLAN to do if you guys think it will be ok. I am gonna lose a bit of the wine when I rack it due to the depth of the sediment. I am thinking that I will boil some sugar water and top off using that. Not sure how much to do however. ALSO am I done with the fining agent with this batch? I mean do I add it again after I rack it?
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Old 09-23-2009, 03:23 AM   #13
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You can "undry" it by back sweetening. Leave it were it is for another few days to finish clearing. Rack to another container, stabilize and degas. I would let it sit for a while after that. When it is aged and ready to bottle, boil up some table sugar with water and add it to the wine in the bottling bucket.

The amount of sweetening can be calculated by gravity points. Wine normally ferments to .996 or so (very dry). By adding enough sugar to get the gravity to 1.000 - 1.008 you have a medium dry wine and above 1.008 would be a sweet wine.

Alternatively, you can measure out a cup of wine and start adding sugar. When it gets to the sweetness you like, calculate the sugar amount needed for the remaining wine. Warning: wine sweetens as it sits in the bottle so don't go crazy with this method or you will end up with Kool Aid.

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Old 09-23-2009, 03:53 AM   #14
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Sometimes, I feel like we are helping guys in prison make alcohol!!! LOL.

"err I need help making wine with bread yeast and a baloon!" hahah!

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Old 09-23-2009, 04:06 AM   #15
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Sometimes, I feel like we are helping guys in prison make alcohol!!! LOL.

"err I need help making wine with bread yeast and a baloon!" hahah!
it happens...you start somewhere...and the bread yeast and ballon blackberry was fantastic.
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Old 09-23-2009, 04:07 AM   #16
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You can "undry" it by back sweetening. Leave it were it is for another few days to finish clearing. Rack to another container, stabilize and degas. I would let it sit for a while after that. When it is aged and ready to bottle, boil up some table sugar with water and add it to the wine in the bottling bucket.

The amount of sweetening can be calculated by gravity points. Wine normally ferments to .996 or so (very dry). By adding enough sugar to get the gravity to 1.000 - 1.008 you have a medium dry wine and above 1.008 would be a sweet wine.

Alternatively, you can measure out a cup of wine and start adding sugar. When it gets to the sweetness you like, calculate the sugar amount needed for the remaining wine. Warning: wine sweetens as it sits in the bottle so don't go crazy with this method or you will end up with Kool Aid.
Thanks. This was at 1.000 on the hydrometer but there were so many suspended solids that HAD to have messed up the reading .
Thank you all for the help, my cell mate and the rest of the guys on the block appreciate it also.
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Old 09-23-2009, 06:20 AM   #17
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I am amazed at how fast this is clearing...the air lock is completely quiet,

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Old 09-23-2009, 01:32 PM   #18
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Bread yeast is fine for certain applications, as long as you recognize its limitations and quirks. See the threads for Joe's Ancient Orange Mead. It will make a decent, sweet, lower ABV wine, even though it makes more CO2 than necessary, is hard to clear, and the lees tend to be puffy and harder to rack off of. Wine yeasts and ale yeasts have been cultivated to have specific properties and avoid some of these issues. Once you get into the hobby, you can try different yeasts for different recipes and see what works for you. I wouldn't totally discount bread yeast just because it's the traditional approach to making hooch, but I would try some of the others out there and see what you like. I use ale yeasts for my ciders, because I like them a little less dry, and ale yeasts give me the taste I like. I've also made some nice apfelwine with champagne and premier cuvee yeasts. I also have 3 gallons of sweet mead going with bread yeast right now. My philosophy is if you're not going to make what you personally like to drink, you may as well go buy something off the shelf.

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Old 09-28-2009, 07:21 PM   #19
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I just went up and checked on the wine ( in a closet upstairs) to see if it had cleared any..it is amazing to me. I can LITERALLY read a paper through it. SMall amount of yuck in the bottom of each bottle. I will leave it set a while longer then degas and bottle it.

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Old 09-28-2009, 08:21 PM   #20
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I love gelatin, it's great stuff.

Campden == potassium metabisulfite. So you are good there.

If you try to backsweeten you will want to add potassium sorbate, to prevent refermentation in the bottle, 1/2 tsp per gallon. Then let it sit with the sugar for a few days just in case it referments so you don't have exploding bottles. If you don't want to make a trip to LHBS call a pharmacy and grocery store and ask them if they have any potassium sorbate, they just might, since it is a common food preservative.

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