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Old 06-01-2011, 03:39 AM   #11
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Why not just ask her?

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Its not terrible, but i get an armpit armoma and flavor.
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Old 06-01-2011, 03:40 AM   #12
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+1 on the grapes.

Grappa is some crazy stuff, it could probably double as a paint remover

You could try using grapes but I would suspect that any stone fruit would produce something yummy (peaches, plums, etc).

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Old 06-01-2011, 03:49 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skyebrewing View Post
Why not just ask her?
I will, but (like I said in the original post) I wanted to see what everyone else thinks. I think it would be interesting to gather everyone's ideas on what to substitute the "fruit" for.

So the consensus so far is leaning toward: whatever the hell I want .
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Old 06-01-2011, 04:00 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by beninan View Post
I will, but (like I said in the original post) I wanted to see what everyone else thinks.
Sorry. Stopped reading half way through post. That's what happens when you enjoy too much of the fruits of your labor..
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Its not terrible, but i get an armpit armoma and flavor.
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Old 06-01-2011, 04:09 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by skyebrewing View Post
Sorry. Stopped reading half way through post. That's what happens when you enjoy too much of the fruits of your labor..
No problem! I suspected that with this being a homebrewing forum, maybe you missed that part of the original post.
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Old 06-01-2011, 06:42 AM   #16
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further clarifier on brandy and etymology: the term comes from the dutch (believe it or not) brandewijn (pronouned branda-vine) meaning fire wine or burnt (as in distilled) wine. in older english it is often called brandywine, which is the same as brandy, which is always distilled wine and not brandy-like wine. in agreement with previous posts. i think it's the only word in common english parlance other than cookie (from koekje pronounced kook-ya and meaning something like tiny cake) that derives directly from modern-ish dutch.
not to say you shouldn't call this wine brandy of you want to, you can call it ted nugent vodka as far as i'm concerned

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Old 06-01-2011, 06:51 AM   #17
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Thanks be to the dutch for having created Jenever and Korenwijn as well! Its sad that they are not very available here stateside...

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Old 06-01-2011, 08:32 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beninan View Post
Basically the title explains it.

My grandmother sent me this brandy recipe after she found out that I have been making my own beer and wine. I'd like to make it sometime and give some to her, but I'm not quite sure on one ingredient. Knowing her, this is a recipe from god-knows-when, most likely during the early prohibition era. I'm planning on tweaking the recipe to something that's a little more "up to today's wine-making standards".

The recipe exactly as written:

"Brandy
3 Gallons warm water
10# Sugar
4 Lemons cut in eights
3 Quarts fruit firmly packed
1 Large cake yeast
Mix well and cover. Stir once a day for 7 days. Then add
4# seedless raisins, let stand for 21 days.
Do not stir after the 7th day. Let stand 28 days total, makes 15 pints."

The fourth ingredient is what I'm stumped at. "3 quarts fruit"? Uh, what kind of fruit? And should I do anything with it, like slice it, or shred it, or blend it?
I'll be contacting her sometime on what exactly she means by this, but I'm interested in what you guys think. Like I said ^ up there somewhere, I'll be tweaking this a bit and use some quality wine yeast and definitely extending the aging time.

Back then and even now lots of people canned their own fruit to get them through the winter.

To do this you take a "Quart Canning Jar" Ball or Kerr brands, cut your fruit into sections and pack it tightly in the jars. Then you poured a boiling sugar syrup over it, remove any air bubbles, cleaned top surface of the jar, and screwed the 2 piece lid on tight.

The next stage involved either a boiling water bath or cooking the jars in in a pressure cooker for a while.

I have on my counter a jar of peaches I canned last year and I had thought that I might make a brandy or wine out of them.

Now I have a recipe.

By the way if you think the cans of fruit you bought at the store are the same, you are in for a great surprize when you can your own.
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Old 06-02-2011, 09:03 PM   #19
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Yep.. It's basically a generic fruit wine recipe.... In general - you will end up with a very sweet, fruity wine..... Many people drink this stuff very young... and it's really not all that good young.... but the heavy sweetness masks all the weird, icky flavors.....

Unfortunately, it's also heavily dependent on the particular yeast used... most of those old recipes used Bread yeast.. which conks out somewhere between 8-14%... If you use a good, high quality Wine yeast or champagne yeast - you likely will end up with rocket fuel.... It may or may not be sweet rocket fuel....

If you want a suggestion on possibly a little better track - check out Jack Keller's wine making website.... His generic method is to make a dry fruit wine, using fruit, water, sugar, tannin, and acid blend.... then backsweeten it to your preferred sweetness level..... This way, you can control what you get.... so you don't get flat coke syrup with alcohol in it if you get my drift...

Thanks

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Old 06-02-2011, 09:16 PM   #20
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Thanks for the replies. I haven't contacted her yet to find out what exactly what she had put in it, but I do know it was some form of berries. I think I may take oldmate's suggestion of blackberries and cherries. Maybe 1 quart of blackberries, 1 quart of cherries, and 1 quart of grapes, how's that sound? I'll use a wine yeast and at least 6 months of aging.

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