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Old 01-18-2013, 02:32 PM   #31
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I'm looking to use Lentils in a recipe and remembered Mahkli might have a similar profile..

So thats for this great write up.. I may try this process if an all grain beer process doesn't work..

Have you tried this process as a "Primary"

Then sit it into a secondary with the sugar you sweetened up with

Then bottle after it cleared..?

That maybe the process I go with the Lentils.. Start as Wine.. Finish as a Beer..?

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Old 01-18-2013, 06:55 PM   #32
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I havent tried to stabilize and then backsweeten this. It might be something to try. I like it effervescent so I havent tried it this way.

The lentil sounds interesting.Please post your results

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Old 01-22-2013, 01:52 PM   #33
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What I like about makoli is that you can drink it after 3 days for that raw unfiltered fresh taste or wait weeks on end and let it clear like wine. My makoli is now clear as any beer and it tastes much better than the "rice wine" from LCBO. I like to add a bit of glucose or maple syrup to give me lots of fiz. I was spending $100 on beer a month but now less than $20/month. I have also found out that you don't need so much "nuruk". Just use a few table spoons is fine...I think if you vitamix it you need even less)...even says so on my nuruk package (didn't believe it until my wife read the korean...my wife is Korean).

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Old 02-14-2013, 10:26 PM   #34
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It's true! You don't need a lot of nuruk. I just completed my third attempt at makgeolli and finally, success! Good thing, because I think I would have lost all hope if I'd made another ****ty batch.

I don't have a scale, because I don't brew other things, so this is what I did.

sterilized fermentation container by wiping thoroughly with soju
add cup of soju to container to inhibit nasty growths (I think it makes a big difference to use soju instead of vodka, but if vodka is all you can get your hands on, use that)
10 cups of cooked short grain rice, new crop (sticky rice, glutinous rice, etc)
*I know a lot of recommendations say not to cook the rice all the way. I cooked it and let it sit in the water after it was done, because I was busy. It was fine.
4 liters of cold water (I was making a double batch, so you'll see I used 4L and 10 cups), mixed in with the rice, let it sit until the whole mixture is cold
10 tbsp of coursely ground nuruk (straight out of the package from the international store) and one tbsp bakers yeast - I mixed this in with my sterilized (with soju) hand, once I was sure that there were not warm pockets. It's really important that things are cold before you add the nuruk. I used bakers yeast because it's what I had
Put a cheese cloth on top of the fermentation container (I used a glass behive), and let it go to work at 65 degrees. We kept our house at 65 the whole time so this could happen correctly, and we kept the container in a place that got no sun. Some recommendations suggest a warmer temperature. Previous experimentation tells me warmer temperatures will increase the sourness and make it taste awful. Colder, with less nuruk, is the answer.
Fermented for 5 days, filtered before the rice cap fell back down. This was for two reasons: 1) I was under a time constraint. 2) It started to smell sour on the fifth day, similar to the last batch I had made, which was awful, and I didn't want it to get to sour.

The results were GREAT. Not sour. Really mild taste. Probably lower alcohol content, but no problem. Because of the delicious taste, there's no need to dilute it, so I ended up with what was basically a high gravity beer (maybe even higher? I've had two cups and I'm feeling pretty toasted.) I backsweetened with Korean maltose (kind of like corn syrup, but it doesn't raise blood sugar in the same way) because I happened to have it around. I think I ended up backsweetening with about 3 oz of maltose per liter. It's so delicious. I'm going to flavor two of my liter bottles- one with almond, and one with vanilla.

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Old 06-19-2013, 02:10 PM   #35
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Hey guys, so I made a few batches and noticed that my bottles get fizzy and sour after about 4-5 days. How do the commercial breweries make it so their product stays stable? Do they pasteurize it to kill the yeast and any bacteria? Is it okay to pasteurize the finished makgeolli?

Edit: I forgot to mention I keep the bottles in the fridge and it still gets fizzy.

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Old 06-20-2013, 11:42 AM   #36
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Put in a container that can vent. Sounds like it wasn't finished fermenting before you bottled..

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Old 06-20-2013, 02:15 PM   #37
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The sugar that you add continues to ferment, so the makgeoli will get sour over a few days, and the bottles will build up pressure. I think commercial breweries use aspartame to work around this issue. I like to add more sugar a few days later. I also like to add almond extract - a lot of the high end makgeoli we drank in korea was chestnut flavored.

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Old 04-28-2014, 11:31 AM   #38
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I just registered to say thanks for this thread! I love how simple you make everything and you explain it all. Most of the time I'm ready threads like this and they assume the reader knows something that I don't know. You explained everything. Great job!

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