Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Wine Making Forum > First Wine
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-06-2010, 01:54 PM   #11
CandleWineProject
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 593
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spider87 View Post
Forgive me, I'm still a newb, but I read this:

As an alternate buy a gallon jug of apple juice (no preservatives), pour yourself a glass (for head space) pour in 1 cup of regular cane sugar, and 1 pack of wine or ale yeast, replace the cap just loose enough to allow the CO2 to escape. In 3-5 days you have hard cider. Let it settle, pour off into an empty leaving the trub. Foolproof.
I slept on this, and it occurred to me that after 3-5 days, it starts fermenting and yes, you have the start of hard cider. The next line says let it settle, which is correct, it just doesn't say that it takes how long it takes to settle, so it is misleading.
__________________
CandleWineProject is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2010, 02:36 PM   #12
spider87
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 17
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CandleWineProject View Post
I slept on this, and it occurred to me that after 3-5 days, it starts fermenting and yes, you have the start of hard cider. The next line says let it settle, which is correct, it just doesn't say that it takes how long it takes to settle, so it is misleading.
Ahh makes sense... But, once it's not bubbling anymore, do I just let it sit for a while until it's cleared up? I dumped it in the sink (the apple 'cider' I attempted) into a spaghetti pot that I then let sit for a week or so just to see what happened. It cleared up perfectly, is that all it really needed?
__________________
spider87 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2010, 02:52 PM   #13
jcobbs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 469
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Ciders and lower alcohol wines won't keep forever, but once they are fermented mold shouldn't be a problem, especially if you've kept things sanitary. Most wines & ciders need additional aging beyond the time it takes for them to clear before they taste good. Even low ABV wines such as bread yeast wines can age up to a year or so. Higher ABV wines can go several years. I would let your wine sit until it clears, might take another month, might not. Then rack (siphon), don't pour, into a jug or carboy with a narrow mouth to minimize any oxygen getting into it. Oxygen before fermentation=good; oxygen after fermentation=off flavors. Get a cheap plastic airlock and stopper from the store and put it on there, and give it 3-6 months. You will be amazed at the difference. I have had several batches of what I thought was homemade paint thinner magically turn into wine at about the 6-7 month point. Just give yourself, and your wine, some time.

__________________
Hickory Glynn Winery & Brewery
jcobbs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2010, 03:22 PM   #14
CandleWineProject
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 593
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spider87 View Post
once it's not bubbling anymore, do I just let it sit for a while until it's cleared up? I dumped it in the sink (the apple 'cider' I attempted) into a spaghetti pot that I then let sit for a week or so just to see what happened. It cleared up perfectly, is that all it really needed?
The best way to tell if it is done is with a hydrometer to see if there is any sugar left to be converted to alcohol, as sometimes the yeasts get "stuck". But yes, if it isn't bubbling and it clears, it is probably done.

As mentioned, siphon because it reduces how much air it comes into contact with.

What is alarming me is the use of the spaghetti pot. Please tell us it isn't metal? Alcohol leached metals out of metal, causing a metallic taste. I also don't think it is good on the metal itself.
__________________
CandleWineProject is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2010, 03:23 PM   #15
spider87
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 17
Default

See though, what I'm trying to do first is just get a taste so I know I haven't royally screwed something up. Right now it's only like 3/4 gal of grape juice aging it for months seems like a waste of time. What I'm looking to do is get this one to the point where it's drinkable and taste it to make sure I didn't screw anything up then after that reassurance, take the step to much larger amounts and longer wait times and stuff. For now though I just want a simple proof of concept. For now though, I don't care if it taste like crap, I just want to try it, being my first batch. Then I want to go to greater lengths with it once I've had one that works. They had to make silly putty coral colored (it's original color) before enhancing it with other colors and stuff, that's what I'm trying to do. Make a base to expand.

__________________
spider87 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2010, 03:25 PM   #16
spider87
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 17
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CandleWineProject View Post
The best way to tell if it is done is with a hydrometer to see if there is any sugar left to be converted to alcohol, as sometimes the yeasts get "stuck". But yes, if it isn't bubbling and it clears, it is probably done.

As mentioned, siphon because it reduces how much air it comes into contact with.

What is alarming me is the use of the spaghetti pot. Please tell us it isn't metal? Alcohol leached metals out of metal, causing a metallic taste. I also don't think it is good on the metal itself.
No no, I mean with the cider. Rather than just dump it all down the drain. I was curious what would happen if it sat a little longer. I had also dumped some boiling water in to kill the yeast off. I didn't plan on drinking it it just happened to be a spaghetti pot. I don't think the pot's nonstick surface like the alcohol sitting on it for that long period of time either because now there's a scratch on the bottom from when I was washing it(the alcohol must have softened the non-stick)... It was cheap anyway.... haha...
__________________
spider87 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2010, 05:30 PM   #17
Emerald
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Michigan
Posts: 237
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spider87 View Post
No no, I mean with the cider. Rather than just dump it all down the drain. I was curious what would happen if it sat a little longer. I had also dumped some boiling water in to kill the yeast off. I didn't plan on drinking it it just happened to be a spaghetti pot. I don't think the pot's nonstick surface like the alcohol sitting on it for that long period of time either because now there's a scratch on the bottom from when I was washing it(the alcohol must have softened the non-stick)... It was cheap anyway.... haha...
This is just my opinion but dude, really no more none-stick pots for your cider making! that stuff is toxic. Just buy a cheap stainless steel pot at wallyworld, or better yet they have a 2 gallon glass cookie jar with a lid for $14 that would work nicely for wine. Or run over to a local bakery and ask to buy a food safe empty frosting bucket with a lid-- they might even just give you one. better safe than dead. EM
__________________
Emerald is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-06-2010, 05:34 PM   #18
spider87
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 17
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emerald View Post
This is just my opinion but dude, really no more none-stick pots for your cider making! that stuff is toxic. Just buy a cheap stainless steel pot at wallyworld, or better yet they have a 2 gallon glass cookie jar with a lid for $14 that would work nicely for wine. Or run over to a local bakery and ask to buy a food safe empty frosting bucket with a lid-- they might even just give you one. better safe than dead. EM
No no no I think you missed my point, I wasn't planning on drinking it at that point (at the point I decided to put it into the non-stick pot). I just wanted to see what happened if I let it sit for a while. It was a step from being down the drain. I wouldn't store anything I was fermenting in metal too many quirks with metal. lol
__________________
spider87 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2010, 02:58 AM   #19
kaiser423
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 487
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by spider87 View Post
See though, what I'm trying to do first is just get a taste so I know I haven't royally screwed something up. Right now it's only like 3/4 gal of grape juice aging it for months seems like a waste of time. What I'm looking to do is get this one to the point where it's drinkable and taste it to make sure I didn't screw anything up then after that reassurance, take the step to much larger amounts and longer wait times and stuff. For now though I just want a simple proof of concept. For now though, I don't care if it taste like crap, I just want to try it, being my first batch. Then I want to go to greater lengths with it once I've had one that works. They had to make silly putty coral colored (it's original color) before enhancing it with other colors and stuff, that's what I'm trying to do. Make a base to expand.
Then give it a try now. It will have alcohol, it will be yeasty, and it will probably taste "hot" without the aging time. If that's what you're looking for right now, then give it a try. Heck, take a very clean turkey baster, and grab yourself a swig out of there. Then wait 2-4 weeks, and use the turkey baster again, then wait 2-4 weeks and do it again. Repeat until gone. It _will_ taste better every time.

That will provide a good proof of concept for you that you are making wine/cider, even at an early stage, and that it is getting better every couple of weeks with aging.

Once you have that figured out, come back and read some about fermentation temperature, sanitizing, etc.
__________________
kaiser423 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2010, 03:36 AM   #20
jcobbs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 469
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

I mentioned it in my earlier post, but if you can get hold of a copy of Terry Garey's book, "The Joy of Home Winemaking," I'd highly recommend it. There are lots of other good winemaking books out there, but based on the questions you have and where you are with trying some things to get started, I think she'd answer a lot of questions and put your mind to rest about the process. She starts you off with a Welch's juice wine and takes you from there to all kinds of wines. Also gives you lots of helpful tips and explains what everything does and is used for. I have no particular interest in recommending her book other than of all the "how to" books I've read, hers seems to be the most interesting and helpful to me.

__________________
Hickory Glynn Winery & Brewery
jcobbs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Has anyone made wine from Midwest's frozen wine grape musts? gingerdawg Wine Making Forum 4 08-29-2011 01:03 AM
Aging my Barley wine with red wine soaked oak chips clept General Techniques 24 01-02-2011 08:56 PM
Plum Wine: Ring of white growth in carboy above wine etisdale Wine Making Forum 6 10-03-2009 06:20 PM
So i have my first wine on the last stage. when will it begin to smelling like wine? Tonypr24 Wine Making Forum 3 01-17-2009 08:29 AM
Wine Maker Online - Manage Your Batches Of Wine! richardn Wine Making Forum 0 08-28-2005 01:16 AM