Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Wine Making Forum > First Time wine - Quick Blackberry
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-17-2009, 04:56 PM   #1
Brewkowski
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brewkowski's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,370
Liked 24 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default First Time wine - Quick Blackberry

I wanted to try my hand at winemaking since it's getting pretty cold out for brewing, and I thought a semi-sweet blackberry would be a good start. Never having made wine, I've looked at several recipes and the technique varies, but this is what I was thinking.

3 Gal batch, start off with about 3.5gal to avoid topping off

12lbs of frozen blackberries
6 lbs of sugar
1 tsp pectic enzyme
1/2 tsp acid blend
1 tsp yeast nutrient
Camden to stabilize
3.5 gallons of bottled water
Yeast (Lavlin K1V-1116)

Mix water, berries, and sugar until dissolved and add other ingredients, except yeast and let sit 24 hours. Pitch yeast and watch it go.

Questions:

-Should I heat the water, berry, sugar mixture?

-Do I need to get liquor off fruit in 5-6 days or could it wait until fermentation is over before transferring to secondary?

-How well do I crush the berries, I've seen potato masher up to blender, I'm trying to do it quick and simple just to get some practice, so I was hoping to put it on the fruit and then siphon it off with a grain bag or panty hose on my siphon tip.

-How much would it change the flavor if I added like 64oz of Niagara grape juice (welch's) or maybe did a 4:1 blackberry/blueberry mix?

-I've only had blackberry dessert wine and that's not what I'm going for, but maybe like a semi-sweet riesling.

-How do you gauge residual sugar? Can I just stick to gravity readings?

__________________
Brewkowski is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-17-2009, 05:11 PM   #2
Dos_Locos_Brewery
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Allentown, PA
Posts: 179
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

This is a great recipe - just keep in mind that you will not need 3.5 gal of water to make the 3.5 gal of wine. I juss made 6 gal. of raspberry wine, and the added water was only ~ 2 gal. A good approach is to add all ingredients except water, and add water until you hit your desired SG. I would suggest keeping it in the 1.090 - 1.10 range. Waiting a day to pitch is OK - just cover it.

Do not heat! Else I will feel compelled to tell a funny story about a wine-making friend who boiled his blackberries...

Primary, secondary, you have a lot of leeway. You can extract tannins from the blackberry seeds, so don't go too long, but I wouldn't worry about going a couple weeks. I'd go more by the status of the ferment. If it's just winding down, that's the best time to go to secondary.

Yes, mash the berries. I like freeze/thaw. It takes more time, but it's way less work.

Blends? Why don't you do the straight blackberry first?

Residual sugar. Best thing is to ferment dry. FG should be 0.095 +/- a few points. Then stabilize with potassium sorbate to prevent re-fermentation. Finally, add sugar to a sample of measured volume to taste. Scale to get the amount to add to the batch, and bottle.

__________________
Dos_Locos_Brewery is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-17-2009, 09:59 PM   #3
Turnerdude1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 212
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Did the light body sweet blackberry, also the medium body and then blended barbara wine into a medium body and it all tasted good..

__________________
Turnerdude1 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-17-2009, 10:21 PM   #4
Brewkowski
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brewkowski's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,370
Liked 24 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

Thanks for the input so far. Is there much of an affect using brown sugar vs. white?

__________________
Brewkowski is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-19-2009, 04:46 PM   #5
Dos_Locos_Brewery
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Allentown, PA
Posts: 179
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hophead75 View Post
Thanks for the input so far. Is there much of an affect using brown sugar vs. white?
I've never even thought about using brown sugar in a wine. In small amounts in an ale, I think the molasses flavors can be interesting. I'm not so sure they would work well in a fruit wine. But what the heck, this is a hobby. If it sounds good to you, go for it (maybe you could substitute part of the white sugar for version 1.0).
__________________
Dos_Locos_Brewery is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-19-2009, 05:18 PM   #6
Brewkowski
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brewkowski's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,370
Liked 24 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

yeah, i think I'll just stick with white sugar for the first time, at least then I'll have a benchmark to work off of. I'm trying to get it with the semi-sweetness of a Spatlese or Auslese, any idea what a good target gravity would be? Somewhere just above 1.000? Also I'm on the fence between the Lalvin Montpellier K1v-1116 and the 71b-1122 Narbonne. According to some sites the Narbonne can retain more fruit character but makes it less acidic.

__________________
Brewkowski is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-19-2009, 05:43 PM   #7
Dos_Locos_Brewery
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Allentown, PA
Posts: 179
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Both of those yeast strains are good - I've used them for many years, and still haven't decided which I like better. To me, the 71b-1122 is softer, sweeter, and maybe retains fruit flavors better. However, these differences are much more subtle in a fruit wine than they would be in a grape wine. As for final gravity, you may need to go a bit higher than 1.000 to get the "equivalent sweetness" of a semi-sweet grape wine, because blackberries are much more acidic than grapes. Using the sweetness adjustment that I described in my first reply is neary fool-proof. Although the flavors will evolve over time, getting the basic acid-sweetness balance is the key, any your palate is a tool far superior to a hydrometer for that.

__________________
Dos_Locos_Brewery is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-20-2009, 02:01 AM   #8
yeastluvr
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Washington St.
Posts: 192
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I just made blackberry wine in August. Dont boil anything. The biggest advice I can give, for what its worth, is of course use a fruit bag for your berries. I let mine ferment in the bag, uncrushed for around 5 days. I thought "there is no way the juice will get extracted out of the berry in 4-5 days. Well, to my suprise there was nothing but seeds left in the bag by day 5. Just make sure you punch down the cap at least once a day with a sanitized spoon to get it broke up and keep it moist. Mine was only left in five days and I made the mistake of squeezing the berry bag when done which was full of seeds. Well, my wine has a lot of tannins in it now from the seeds, almost a slight bitterness. I personally wouldn't leave the fruit in the ferment more then 5-7 days and I think you'll find the fruit will be mostly gone by then anyway.

__________________
yeastluvr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-20-2009, 02:26 PM   #9
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,651
Liked 134 Times on 127 Posts

Default

With that recipe, a FG of 0.992 or so is possible. Mine started at 1.109 and finished at 0.991. So, if you stop it at 1.000, you'll have about 2% residual sugar. I let mine ferment out and will back-sweeten with white grape juice concentrate.

You can just track the gravity and start sampling for sweetness around 1.004 and stop the ferment when it's right.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-20-2009, 08:36 PM   #10
Brewkowski
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brewkowski's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,370
Liked 24 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

Well, I was planning on Blackberries, but I found out that's the one type of berry not on sale at the store and I'm cheap so I'd rather not spend $50 on frozen berries, but if it makes a few bottles of good wine I guess it's worth it. They do have strawberries and blueberries on sale, would any of these make a potentially good semi-sweet wine that you could drink alone or with food?

__________________
Brewkowski is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Blackberry Wine Yooper Wine 55 08-11-2014 07:01 PM
Blackberry wine Dark_Ale Wine Making Forum 19 07-12-2013 01:52 PM
Blackberry wine HELP! yeastluvr Wine Making Forum 10 08-21-2009 01:44 PM
Blackberry Wine Dejay2 Wine Making Forum 4 07-22-2008 10:57 AM
Blackberry wine in my future david_42 Wine Making Forum 0 07-29-2006 04:48 AM