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Old 11-24-2010, 01:28 PM   #1
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hi there,

what is the best internet beginner turorial for wine making from scratch? I found so many of them, but they are all very partial and confusing.... I need something that will describe whole process from fresh fruit to glass with easy to understand instructions...

thank you

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Old 11-24-2010, 10:44 PM   #2
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describe whole process
A good cook can make wine from a recipe, but a good chef can make wine out of anything.

Instead of having a fish aquarium, think of it as a yeast aquarium. If you provide the correct environment (food, temp, etc), they will thrive and make a good wine maker happy.
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Old 11-24-2010, 10:49 PM   #3
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not the easiest website to navigate - but a ton of info:

http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/

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Old 11-25-2010, 12:50 AM   #4
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not the easiest website to navigate - but a ton of info:

http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/
Yep, I agree! If you scroll to the bottom, start with the button for "basics" and then "advanced" and then take a look at "requested recipes". He has recipes for everything- and good ones!

The techniques are easy, but you can't skip them so make sure you read over the basics and then click onto the "step 1" in depth part.

As AZ_IPA said, the site is hard to navigate at first, but it's worth sticking with it!
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Old 11-25-2010, 01:01 AM   #5
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+1 for Jack Kellar's site. Lots of good info, lots of recipes with detailed steps. He has obviously spent a LOT of time thinking and writing about this topic.

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Old 11-25-2010, 11:17 AM   #6
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I gotta say, no matter how good the site is, you just won't understand some stuff until you either see it, or you do it. It just never made sense to me, no matter how much I read, until I actually did it myself.

You have some options for starting out:

- Take a class from a local winery or LHBS.

- Amazon.com has some good, cheap wine kits. Make one of those (they have good instructions and include everything but bottles) and *then* read Jack Keller. It will make a lot more sense after you've done it once.

- Check out how "craigtube" does it on YouTube... a lot of people have issues with how he does it, but it does give you a chance to see the things that the books just explain. There are other videos, too, like this one where a different guy makes wine from frozen raspberries.


Any of these are a good way to get started and really learn how to make your own wine. They all have upsides and downsides, but reading about brewing can only get you so far until you start learning from your own mistakes.

Good luck, and enjoy!
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Old 11-25-2010, 01:17 PM   #7
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Check out how "craigtube" does it on YouTube...
I thought that was nasty washing dishes in his fermenter. He didn't wait 12 hours from campden to pectin either. A 6.5 gallon pail for a 1 gallon batch would leave a heck of alot of head space for oxidation. Grinding the spoon around on the bottom of the bucket will scratch it up and cause cleaning problems. Pectic enzyme converts pectin into methyl alcohol (wood alcohol). As pretty as the video looks, it's more of a what not to do video.
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Old 11-25-2010, 01:32 PM   #8
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I thought that was nasty washing dishes in his fermenter. He didn't wait 12 hours from campden to pectin either. A 6.5 gallon pail for a 1 gallon batch would leave a heck of alot of head space for oxidation. Grinding the spoon around on the bottom of the bucket will scratch it up and cause cleaning problems. Pectic enzyme converts pectin into methyl alcohol (wood alcohol). As pretty as the video looks, it's more of a what not to do video.
That wasn't craigtube... craigtube uses kits.

You're right, this guy makes a lot of mistakes (didn't squeeze his fruit bag so his OG was 1.035!) and doesn't even know what a hydrometer is called. BUUUUT... he put something up on YouTube so newbs could see what he was doing.

1) Pectinase can still work in the presence of campden. Not as well, but it can still work. Jack says, "It is best to wait a few hours after adding sulfites (Campden tablets or potassium metabisulfite) before adding pectic enzyme, as its action is retarded by an excess of sulfur dioxide." http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/adding.asp

2) Waaaaay too much headspace, but at this early point oxygen could be helpful. Will 1 gallon of wine make 5.5 gallons worth of CO2? Probably. 1 mole of CO2 ~ 22 L, 40 g worth.

3) I don't think scratches are as big a deal as some other people think. Also, I'm not sure sugar is quite hard enough to cause severe scratches, I think it might just cause the relatively harmless surface ones.

4) Didn't you just say his pectic enzyme wasn't going to work anyways?

See, a complete noob doesn't even know these simple things, and they also don't know that 1) most things are opinion/preference, and 2) most mistakes are minor.

Watching it in action gives one a much more clear idea of how things are done, though -- even if you don't necessarily want to emulate *exactly* what you see.
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Old 11-25-2010, 03:05 PM   #9
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400d, read the tutorials and about wine making on jack's site, pick a simple recipe, read it until you understand it and go for it! All you need for equipment at this point is a fermentor, an airlock and bung, a kettle and some time.

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Old 12-02-2010, 02:11 PM   #10
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Ya'll aint helpin.

400d this is how you'll get it.

Get some kind of juice. get an empty food grade container... like a milk jug. clean/sanitise it best you can (if its glass use extremely diluted bleachwater then rinse like nuts). Pour juice in container. put yeast (ANY kind) in a half cup of water for a half hour. Pour yeastwater in container. cut up and toss in half a handful of raisins Or some yeast nutrient. Pour in a cup or two of sugar if its a nonsweet juice (this isnt really anecessary step). Put a baloon on the top with a couple pinpricks in it. A week from now once the balloon is deflated siphon the liquid away from the yeast in the bottom (you can switch it to a clear container first and let it resettle then do this). Put it in the fridge for a coupledays. Rerack it (siphon off the nonyeast). Taste.

Youve just used one of the oldest winemaking techniques on the planet.
Now that you have something thats alcoholic and drinkable.. NOW you can go spend some money and try more advanced techniques.

A note things like specialty yeast, sanitiser, etc will make things much easier and youll have less wine go bad. Buy yourself some bubbers, carboys etc later. YOu can honestly get all the stuff that REALLY helps at your lhbs for 10 bucks. After that its just gravy.

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