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Old 11-05-2005, 01:56 AM   #1
OtherWhiteMeat
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Default Bottling Q's

Im looking to start making wine. I was wondering if there was a reason wine is kept in large bottles and if there is any reason why i couldent bottle it in beer bottles.

Heres why; If i make wine it will be drunk in very rare occations, and in small amounts. I dont want to open a large bottle, use 1/4 of it and have it go bad becuase the next time i drink more is 2 months later.

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Old 11-05-2005, 02:36 AM   #2
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Wine, especially sparkling, is under a lot of pressure (carbonation). That's why they are stored in larger (heavier) glass bottles.

I don't know where you live, but I've mentioned it before that with office Christmas parties coming soon you'll have a FREE source of champagne bottles if you go to hotels and ask for their bottles when they clean up.

Most of them are getting trashed anyway. You may as well benefit from it.

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Old 11-05-2005, 12:39 PM   #3
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There's nothing wrong with bottling wine in beer bottles - beer bottles are thicker glass than standard wine bottles anyway. The only issue i could see a problem with is just how long you could age wine with a capped top. I can't think of any commercial companies who do that - screw tops yes, crown caps no.

If you don't plan to age it for years then it's a great idea. Just hope you have enough bottles to brew both!

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Old 11-05-2005, 02:08 PM   #4
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I'd use the O2 absorbing tops for bottling wine, but there shouldn't be any problem using beer bottles. The old line was that you used natural cork to allow some O2 leak to help aging, but receint testing of plastic composition corks shows that's wrong. No O2 = no spoilage.

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Old 11-05-2005, 03:06 PM   #5
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What do most people on this board cap with? The recipeis that im thinking about trying first are fruit wines that age to 6m and mature at a year. And im going to do 1 gal batches to start with until I find something I really like.

Im in minnesota, and all my brewing stuff sits in the basment wich will be around 60 all winter, is this ok for fermentation?

Who would I ask at a hotel for bottles? I have 12 cases of beer bottles right now but they fill up fast when i have events coming up.

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Up next:
Primary:
Bottled: Franziskaner Hefeweizen
Bottled: Light American Pale Ale
Bottled: Newcastle clone
Bottled: Light Honey Ale
Bottled: Apple Cider (Tastes more like sweet wine)
Bottled: Apricot Ale(finished)

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Old 11-05-2005, 10:46 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OtherWhiteMeat
What do most people on this board cap with? The recipeis that im thinking about trying first are fruit wines that age to 6m and mature at a year. And im going to do 1 gal batches to start with until I find something I really like.

Im in minnesota, and all my brewing stuff sits in the basment wich will be around 60 all winter, is this ok for fermentation?

Who would I ask at a hotel for bottles? I have 12 cases of beer bottles right now but they fill up fast when i have events coming up.
1 Gal is perfect - it'll let you experiment and find a wine to your taste.

60F is a little cool i'm sure for fermentation. I'm sure you can sneak a 1 gallon fermenter into your warmer house to start it! No space taken up there really - But your basement is perfect for racking to secondary to clear your wine.

Access to the bottle bins in hotels means you'll need to speak to the Bar Staff of course! Get in and ask when they're quiet!
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Old 11-06-2005, 04:54 PM   #7
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If im going to make one gallon batches what do you use for the primary? All the 1 gal glass bottles say that they are secondarys.

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Up next:
Primary:
Bottled: Franziskaner Hefeweizen
Bottled: Light American Pale Ale
Bottled: Newcastle clone
Bottled: Light Honey Ale
Bottled: Apple Cider (Tastes more like sweet wine)
Bottled: Apricot Ale(finished)

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Old 11-06-2005, 06:22 PM   #8
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A small plastic brew bin (about 2 gallon) will be perfect - Wine yeasts go crazy for the first few days (with all the extra sugar etc) so you're right in thinking the must will be up through the airlock on a 1 gallon glass container before you can stop it with some recipes!
I always start my wine in a brew bin with the lid not clicked down shut BUT ALWAYS weighed down with a heavy item. This stops anything getting in but allows the CO2 out. Once the crazy yeast start up is over a transfer to glass under an airlock.

Small plastic brew bins are really cheap to start up with and also easily replaced - they don't last forever because the surfaces scuff and offer chances for nasty bacteria to get in but they do the business if you're prepared to replace them regularly.

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Old 11-06-2005, 07:00 PM   #9
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If i do a 1 gal batch, can I use a plastic 6 gal primary w/airlock like i use for beer? (not the same of course) Or is there a negetive reason for having all that extra space in there?

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Up next:
Primary:
Bottled: Franziskaner Hefeweizen
Bottled: Light American Pale Ale
Bottled: Newcastle clone
Bottled: Light Honey Ale
Bottled: Apple Cider (Tastes more like sweet wine)
Bottled: Apricot Ale(finished)

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Old 11-06-2005, 09:10 PM   #10
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You can use the same brew bin for your beer! - it'll be food quality plastic. Close it off under the airlock as it's a big bin. With the extra space the must won't get to the top (which you don't want showering out of the airlock anyway!) but the yeast will use the extra oxygen till it really starts (Good in the primary!). Just make sure the airlock doesn't get 'blown out' dry to let nasties in. After a few of days (depending on recipe - when the air lock slows) rack to glass (you'll notice a lot more trub compared to beer primary in the bucket!) and put under airlock. That's when the fun begins!

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